Voyeur Reviews

  • Aug 23, 2018

    Interesting documentatry about a 'pervert' and the pulitzer-winning journalist who told his story, While the starting premise is salacious; it shifts to an in-depth look at the noble profession of journalism. Watch if you're in the mood for a documentary on perversions and/or journalism.

    Interesting documentatry about a 'pervert' and the pulitzer-winning journalist who told his story, While the starting premise is salacious; it shifts to an in-depth look at the noble profession of journalism. Watch if you're in the mood for a documentary on perversions and/or journalism.

  • Mar 21, 2018

    THE BACK AND FORTH BETWEEN THE TWO MAIN PEOPLE IN THIS MOVIE IS PRICELESS. THE MOVIE IT SELF CREEPED ME OUT AND MAKES ME NOT WANT TO BONE IN A HOTEL ANYMORE.

    THE BACK AND FORTH BETWEEN THE TWO MAIN PEOPLE IN THIS MOVIE IS PRICELESS. THE MOVIE IT SELF CREEPED ME OUT AND MAKES ME NOT WANT TO BONE IN A HOTEL ANYMORE.

  • Carlos M Super Reviewer
    Feb 02, 2018

    An intriguing documentary that peeks at the creepy real story of a narcissistic voyeur who wanted to be like God and have the power to secretly watch other people's lives, and it becomes fascinating as inconsistencies begin to appear and we wonder what is true and false in his claims.

    An intriguing documentary that peeks at the creepy real story of a narcissistic voyeur who wanted to be like God and have the power to secretly watch other people's lives, and it becomes fascinating as inconsistencies begin to appear and we wonder what is true and false in his claims.

  • Jan 16, 2018

    This is not a documentary that’s going to blow you away. I would not watch it again but I did appreciate it. I enjoyed getting to know both of the characters. The main guy who ran the hotel and the guy who is writing the story. From a videographer‘s perspective, I enjoyed watching the editing, the shots they got, and it was really cool when they built the hotel set and showed the owner looking into the fake hotel. So they had a lot going for it. Stylistically I approved. The story kind of dragged on but it also gave me a really good glance into what can happen to you when you publish a story like this and you receive backlash or people hating on you and giving you threats.

    This is not a documentary that’s going to blow you away. I would not watch it again but I did appreciate it. I enjoyed getting to know both of the characters. The main guy who ran the hotel and the guy who is writing the story. From a videographer‘s perspective, I enjoyed watching the editing, the shots they got, and it was really cool when they built the hotel set and showed the owner looking into the fake hotel. So they had a lot going for it. Stylistically I approved. The story kind of dragged on but it also gave me a really good glance into what can happen to you when you publish a story like this and you receive backlash or people hating on you and giving you threats.

  • Jan 05, 2018

    When I first read the New Yorker article I was both creeped out and intrigued at how this sort of thing could have happened and for so long. Reading it I even felt kind of like a creep myself, even fourth-hand knowing this information. And yet now, watching this documentary, I realized perhaps it's more of an evolution of voyeurism. Foos watches in private for pleasure, Talese watches for public consumption, and then here we are living vicariously through them both. In general I sort of feel like the modern condition is built around voyeurism. Reality TV, the internet, anything goes sex and violence, free porn, documentaries about a man who just secretly watched people bone for a decade.... it's almost hard to judge him when he basically just came up with "binge watching" but in real life and decades before it was bought, sold and marketed. Does that still make him a creep? Totally. Does that make us creeps? Yeah dude. Doesn't matter if we're not getting off on it, we're still lapping it up at every turn. Other than that realization this doesn't really offer much in the way of new information. It's fun to watch Gay Talese strut around in those beautiful suits and that immense ego at least. I love his damn house. I also enjoyed the doll house version of this hotel. But it's pretty strictly a talking head real-time doc of how the book happened, which honestly doesn't offer that many twists or turns that aren't eventually undone by the film itself.

    When I first read the New Yorker article I was both creeped out and intrigued at how this sort of thing could have happened and for so long. Reading it I even felt kind of like a creep myself, even fourth-hand knowing this information. And yet now, watching this documentary, I realized perhaps it's more of an evolution of voyeurism. Foos watches in private for pleasure, Talese watches for public consumption, and then here we are living vicariously through them both. In general I sort of feel like the modern condition is built around voyeurism. Reality TV, the internet, anything goes sex and violence, free porn, documentaries about a man who just secretly watched people bone for a decade.... it's almost hard to judge him when he basically just came up with "binge watching" but in real life and decades before it was bought, sold and marketed. Does that still make him a creep? Totally. Does that make us creeps? Yeah dude. Doesn't matter if we're not getting off on it, we're still lapping it up at every turn. Other than that realization this doesn't really offer much in the way of new information. It's fun to watch Gay Talese strut around in those beautiful suits and that immense ego at least. I love his damn house. I also enjoyed the doll house version of this hotel. But it's pretty strictly a talking head real-time doc of how the book happened, which honestly doesn't offer that many twists or turns that aren't eventually undone by the film itself.

  • Dec 24, 2017

    we get it. He likes to stare at people and the author wants to exploit it. WOW. Could've told this story in 20 minutes.

    we get it. He likes to stare at people and the author wants to exploit it. WOW. Could've told this story in 20 minutes.

  • Dec 19, 2017

    Peeping tom. So this is a documentary about real life creep Gerald Foos. He previously owned a motel in his younger days. Little did his guests know that he had modified the building so as to have full visibility to every room through the ventilation system and used it to watch his guests on the nightly. Much like a Bond villain, he can't take his secret to the grave. When he is compelled to reveal his secret, that is where we, the audience, come in. Now I just stumbled upon this while perusing the Netflix library, and it seemed interesting enough. The subject is certainly sordid, and the preview trailer that automatically playing was attention grabbing. As far as documentaries go, this is far from my favorite, but I do suppose that it could have been worse. The one interesting thing that this documentary has going for it is that it is just as much about its subject as it is the person studying him. Acclaimed author Gay Talese is the one that wrote the novel about this guy, and he is prominently featured in the documentary. This isn't just about what went down in this man's hotel, it is also about the article Talese wrote, and the fallout that happened when one of the sources ended up getting discredited. I do believe I may be making this sound more interesting than it actually is. It's not like it is boring, but there is quite frankly not enough material to make a 95 minute feature about. I could see this working as a documentary short that lasts about 30 minutes and doesn't overstay its welcome. As it stands, it starts to repeat itself in fairly short order. So much of this features this doll house, and our subject matter lifting up the roof and peering in for dramatic effect. It's a neat visual... at first. After it gets overused for the fifteenth time they use it, it stops holding your attention. Even though it is dark and interesting, it's never captivating, and the movie that handled sexual deviances way better is Tickled, although it does feels weird comparing a documentary to another documentary. The subject itself is pretty gross and it does skeeve you out, although I did keep getting yanked out of the movie because Gerald Foos sounds exactly like Walter Sobchak from The Big Lebowski. Voyeur is all right, and it won't make a huge difference one way or the other if you decide to watch or keep on scrolling by it.

    Peeping tom. So this is a documentary about real life creep Gerald Foos. He previously owned a motel in his younger days. Little did his guests know that he had modified the building so as to have full visibility to every room through the ventilation system and used it to watch his guests on the nightly. Much like a Bond villain, he can't take his secret to the grave. When he is compelled to reveal his secret, that is where we, the audience, come in. Now I just stumbled upon this while perusing the Netflix library, and it seemed interesting enough. The subject is certainly sordid, and the preview trailer that automatically playing was attention grabbing. As far as documentaries go, this is far from my favorite, but I do suppose that it could have been worse. The one interesting thing that this documentary has going for it is that it is just as much about its subject as it is the person studying him. Acclaimed author Gay Talese is the one that wrote the novel about this guy, and he is prominently featured in the documentary. This isn't just about what went down in this man's hotel, it is also about the article Talese wrote, and the fallout that happened when one of the sources ended up getting discredited. I do believe I may be making this sound more interesting than it actually is. It's not like it is boring, but there is quite frankly not enough material to make a 95 minute feature about. I could see this working as a documentary short that lasts about 30 minutes and doesn't overstay its welcome. As it stands, it starts to repeat itself in fairly short order. So much of this features this doll house, and our subject matter lifting up the roof and peering in for dramatic effect. It's a neat visual... at first. After it gets overused for the fifteenth time they use it, it stops holding your attention. Even though it is dark and interesting, it's never captivating, and the movie that handled sexual deviances way better is Tickled, although it does feels weird comparing a documentary to another documentary. The subject itself is pretty gross and it does skeeve you out, although I did keep getting yanked out of the movie because Gerald Foos sounds exactly like Walter Sobchak from The Big Lebowski. Voyeur is all right, and it won't make a huge difference one way or the other if you decide to watch or keep on scrolling by it.

  • Dec 17, 2017

    Lots to think about.

    Lots to think about.

  • Dec 13, 2017

    Excellent doc and very captivating. Loved he style and the way the story unfolded. It was two stories told concurrently - each one playing of the other. Such a fascinating character.

    Excellent doc and very captivating. Loved he style and the way the story unfolded. It was two stories told concurrently - each one playing of the other. Such a fascinating character.

  • Dec 13, 2017

    Voyeur is about a journalist named Gay Talese. This is an important distinction. As much as it is also about a man named Gerald Foos, who outfitted an entire motel to be his personal voyeuristic laboratory, it is really about Talese's 30+ year journey reporting and writing about Foos. Kane, Koury, and their entire crew deserve some serious kudos. I can't imagine how much footage they must have shot and how uncomfortable and strange the production of this film must have been. They did an amazing job of capturing and combining raw reactions, cinematic dramatizations, and archival footage into a focused and entertaining tale of two men who are obsessed with their crafts. The reason I gave this doc a 3.5 instead of a 4 is because I am not sure it is for everyone. The content is so challenging, creepy, and uncomfortable that you feel like you want to take a shower after it is over (just make sure you close your air vents first). While it is brilliantly done, it is definitely not a feel good movie with universal appeal. To be clear, that doesn't mean it isn't of the highest quality, it just means I am not sure it is what most people want to spend their precious free time watching.

    Voyeur is about a journalist named Gay Talese. This is an important distinction. As much as it is also about a man named Gerald Foos, who outfitted an entire motel to be his personal voyeuristic laboratory, it is really about Talese's 30+ year journey reporting and writing about Foos. Kane, Koury, and their entire crew deserve some serious kudos. I can't imagine how much footage they must have shot and how uncomfortable and strange the production of this film must have been. They did an amazing job of capturing and combining raw reactions, cinematic dramatizations, and archival footage into a focused and entertaining tale of two men who are obsessed with their crafts. The reason I gave this doc a 3.5 instead of a 4 is because I am not sure it is for everyone. The content is so challenging, creepy, and uncomfortable that you feel like you want to take a shower after it is over (just make sure you close your air vents first). While it is brilliantly done, it is definitely not a feel good movie with universal appeal. To be clear, that doesn't mean it isn't of the highest quality, it just means I am not sure it is what most people want to spend their precious free time watching.