Better Call Saul: Season 2 Episode 5 - TV Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Better Call Saul: Season 2 Episode 5 Reviews

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Ed Power
Daily Telegraph (UK)
Top Critic
May 11, 2016

The big problem is that the central storyline simply isn't going anywhere interesting and is taking too long (not) getting there.

Sean Fennell
PopMatters
March 16, 2016

"Rebecca" is less about what happened and more about the reasons why it did. In a show as rich as Better Call Saul, that's more than enough for an episode to take on.

Full Review | Original Score: 7/10
Jordan Decker
The Young Folks
March 15, 2016

Even an OK episode of Saul is akin to a first world problem: I only feel cheated because I'm simply spoiled by the show the rest of the time.

Full Review | Original Score: 7.5/10
Greg Cwik
indieWire
Top Critic
March 15, 2016

Better Call Saul is one of the best dramas on television because it has no obvious heroes and villains, no one to really root against. (Well, Tuco is pretty much a textbook villain, but everyone else, even Nacho, defies easy categorization.)

Matt Webb Mitovich
TV Line
March 15, 2016

Capping an hour that was otherwise wonderfully Kim-centric, banged-up-and-bruised Mike was approached at the diner by... the hothead [Tuca's] uncle Hector "Tio" Salamanca.

Alan Sepinwall
HitFix
March 15, 2016

Saul has figured out how to have the best of both worlds with this Jimmy/Mike split, even if the transitions can occasionally feel jarring. And that tension between the two halves of the show is emblematic of what Jimmy is going through.

David Segal
New York Times
Top Critic
March 15, 2016

Near the end of "Rebecca" the show leaves law firms and pivots to Mike, who is eating alone at a diner. In walks none other than Hector Salamanca. What a pleasure to again meet this menacing little cretin and Juarez cartel member.

Sean T. Collins
Observer
Top Critic
March 15, 2016

The Jimmy half of Better Call Saul is very good, sure. But the Mike half of Better Call Saul feels like the onset of a panic attack.

Donna Bowman
Nashville Scene
March 15, 2016

Everybody's talking past each other in "Rebecca." If they pause to listen-like Kim, like Mike-they'll know exactly where they stand. And it has very little to do with how hard they worked to get there.

Full Review | Original Score: A
Terri Schwartz
IGN Movies
March 15, 2016

The focus on Kim and Chuck without Jimmy in their scenes allowed Better Call Saul to examine the impact he had on them, and made for some compelling television.

Full Review | Original Score: 9/10
Kenny Herzog
New York Magazine/Vulture
Top Critic
March 15, 2016

If "Rebecca" illuminates anything, it's that Chuck wasn't always this withdrawn.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Tim Surette
TV.com
March 15, 2016

I don't expect everyone else to, but darned it, I really loved this episode of Better Call Saul... [It] cracked its knuckles and reemphasized why Better Call Saul IS one of the best programs on TV right now: its outstanding writing.

Liz Shannon Miller
indieWire
Top Critic
March 15, 2016

The nuances that come out thanks to the show's quiet and measured approach end up truly elevating each scene, as we wait to see just how bad things are going to get.

Full Review | Original Score: A-
Alan Eyerly
Baltimore Sun
March 15, 2016

The backstory of estranged brothers Chuck (Michael McKean) and Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) becomes a bit clearer on "Rebecca," Episode 205 of AMC's Better Call Saul.

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