Homeland: Season 4 (2014)

SEASON:

Season 4
Homeland

Critics Consensus

Homeland is back on top, with a renewed energy and focus not seen since its first season.

81%

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 45

90%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 868

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Episodes

1
Air date: Oct 5, 2014
2
Air date: Oct 5, 2014
3
Air date: Oct 12, 2014
4
Air date: Oct 19, 2014
5
Air date: Oct 26, 2014
6
Air date: Nov 2, 2014
7
Air date: Nov 9, 2014
8
Air date: Nov 16, 2014
9
Air date: Nov 23, 2014
10
Air date: Dec 7, 2014
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Homeland: Season 4 Photos

Tv Season Info

Season 4 of the spy drama begins with Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) working as the CIA Chief of Station in Kabul, Afghanistan, where she receives an urgent intelligence report from her counterpart in Islamabad on the whereabouts of terrorist Haissam Haqqani (Numan Acar) in Pakistan. Carrie orders an assault against him, but her actions result in the deaths of 40 civilians attending a wedding at the same location. Consequently, CIA director Andrew Lockhart (Tracy Letts) recalls her back to the U.S. However, a major scandal casts shadows over Lockhart's actions. Meanwhile, Saul Berenson (Mandy Patinkin) struggles to adjust to life in the private sector; and Carrie learns that Haqqani may have survived the initial attack, which could lead to deadly consequences for everyone involved.

Cast

Claire Danes
as Carrie Mathison
Mandy Patinkin
as Saul Berenson
Sarita Choudhury
as Mira Berenson
Rupert Friend
as Peter Quinn
Damian Lewis
as Nicholas Brody
Tracy Letts
as Sen. Andrew Lockhart
Laila Robins
as Martha Boyd
Morena Baccarin
as Jessica Brody
David Harewood
as David Estes
Michael O'Keefe
as John Redmond
Diego Klattenhoff
as Capt. Mike Faber
Nazanin Boniadi
as Fara Sharazi
Morgan Saylor
as Dana Brody
Jackson Pace
as Chris Brody
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News & Interviews for Homeland: Season 4

Critic Reviews for Homeland Season 4

All Critics (45) | Top Critics (25)

It is still psychologically astute, but it has become a much more straightforward, and largely effective, spy show.

Oct 1, 2014 | Full Review…
Top Critic

The show has reset and is now prepared to move forward. And how refreshing it is.

Oct 6, 2014 | Full Review…
Top Critic

[Claire] Danes' Carrie is steelier than ever, her heart hardened to near-concrete while going about the exhilarating business of eliminating terrorists no matter what the collateral damage.

Oct 3, 2014 | Rating: B+ | Full Review…
Top Critic

If the season turns out to be primarily a complex Middle East thriller, that could still be entertaining. Homeland has just set us up to want more.

Oct 3, 2014 | Rating: 4/5 | Full Review…

It's clear that Homeland, this many years in, is just like Saul: It still has things to say, and ideas to explore, even if they're not always comfortable to absorb.

Oct 3, 2014 | Full Review…
NPR
Top Critic

Here's hoping the drama can avoid the credibility problems of past seasons while launching a taut and topical new story.

Oct 3, 2014 | Full Review…

It suffers too much from echoes of stuff you've seen before, from Secret State to Edge of Darkness, while the fancy on-screen overlays of computer data are too brazenly post-Sherlock for comfort.

Jul 24, 2018 | Full Review…

Homeland has officially gone from America's shining self-examination of foreign policy to just another basic cable spy-drama that's been there and done that, and it shows no signs of returning to form any time soon.

Sep 29, 2014 | Full Review…

"Homeland" is back big time with a fourth season that replicates the greatness of the show's first season.

Sep 28, 2014 | Rating: 5.0/5 | Full Review…

It redirects its focus away from prep schools and bedrooms (bye bye, Dana and Jessica Brody) and back onto the pitfalls and immoralities consistent with fighting something as unscrupulous as the war on terror.

Oct 6, 2014 | Rating: A- | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Homeland: Season 4

  • Mar 11, 2019
    Well conceived. The first five seasons of Homeland are outstanding--thoughtful and patient writing, excellent acting, characters with depth. As good as television gets.
  • Feb 11, 2018
    Not the same. Could Carrie be more cold hearted?? I dont think she has a heart at all. Im disappointed
  • Feb 05, 2018
    One of the worse seasons so far!!!
  • Dec 23, 2017
    One of the best shows!
  • Jun 06, 2017
    Season 4 of the spy drama begins with Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) working as the CIA Chief of Station in Kabul, Afghanistan, where she receives an urgent intelligence report from her counterpart in Islamabad on the whereabouts of terrorist Haissam Haqqani (Numan Acar) in Pakistan. Carrie orders an assault against him, but her actions result in the deaths of 40 civilians attending a wedding at the same location. Consequently, CIA director Andrew Lockhart (Tracy Letts) recalls her back to the US. However, a major scandal casts shadows over Lockhart’s actions. Meanwhile, Saul Berenson (Mandy Patinkin) struggles to adjust to life in the private sector; and Carrie learns that Haqqani may have survived the initial attack, which could lead to deadly consequences for everyone involved. (Rotten Tomatoes) * Major Spoilers From Previous Seasons Ahead* Season Four of Homeland has hit a reset of sorts following the extraordinary departure of Nick Brody from the story-line. That decision was made probably at the right time as the show needed to move on from the Carrie-Nick tango which has lost some of the intensity that we saw in the opening two seasons. This season shows that the writers are prepared to move forward with the focus solely on Carrie and it is refreshing and boy does it pay off! Homeland is fearlessly brave in its conducting of Carrie’s bipolar, and now it goes even further as Carrie struggles with motherhood, being off her meds and trying to control the effects of a drone strike that is the centrepoint for storylines that come into play in this season. Carrie is now in charge of missions while in the Middle East, and she finds herself at the heart of an incident that threatens to undo US-Pakistani relations and she also has to prevent the resurgence of Islamist terror groups gaining more power. Rupert Friend as Peter Quinn, takes over the mantle as the new male lead, and he and Carrie are refreshingly just colleagues. Quinn is a tortured lead that is more likeable than Brody ever could be, he has an interesting backstory, motives and is unquestionably loyal to Carrie and CIA, although the loyalties between the two are sometimes different. The fact that the story begins with an innocent victim of a drone strike and seeing the horror from his perspective humanizes the violence and destruction from the ground level of these missile strikes the U.S. carries out in the Middle East. These are the people living their lives in the shadow of American might and Taliban/Al-Qaeda/ISIS terror, and while it might be easy to paint them all the same way with a wide brush of anti-Western sentiment, they are as varied in their thoughts and geopolitical stances as we are. Homeland is about international intrigue and espionage, and Season Four firmly puts that as its central objective. The season is well paced and quickens up as the impending confrontation becomes more and more inevitable, with some brilliant acting performances all round, Homeland produces yet another fantastic season that is fats making it my favourite TV show. https://rwh92.wordpress.com/
  • Apr 22, 2017
    Best season in the series
  • Mar 13, 2017
    Had some good twists and continued excellence.
  • Feb 25, 2017
    (Warning: this review will include spoilers from earlier seasons of Homeland). Coming into this fourth season of Homeland, my expectations really couldn't have been any lower. After a rollercoaster third season where the finale really felt like a series finale rather than a season finale, I didn't know what to expect from a show that seemed like it was starting back from square one. After a few episodes of finding its way, however, this season really kicks into high gear and proves that (though rare) a show can sometimes re-invent itself on the fly. For a basic plot summary (only minor spoilers here), this season begins with Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) trying to come to terms with the absence of Nicholas Brody (Damian Lewis), what with the daughter she now has that is his. She decides to run from that particular responsibility by taking an assignment overseas in Islamabad, where she investigates a terrorist bombing. A young man named Aayan Ibrahim (Suraj Sharma) is the best asset to solving that mystery, but that investigation leads down a completely new path involving figures of the foreign government, a restless Saul Berenson (Mandy Patinkin), and a Peter Quinn (Rupert Friend) who is about as unstable as the mission itself. The first few episodes of this season are truly pretty bad. Just a couple of episodes in, I almost questioned whether I wanted to continue with this show. It was that much of a struggle for me to get through. The absence of Brody is glaring, and the writers don't quite seem to know yet how to move on. Even when Carrie arrives in Islamabad and begins an investigation, the show seems like just another run-of-the-mill procedural drama. But then, about 4-5 episodes in, a few events transpire that really set the action into motion. I don't want to spoil everything, but suffice it to say that there is a scene with Damien Lewis, as well as a shocking event that will completely change the direction the show takes. From there, the show kicks into high gear and I couldn't wait for each Sunday night. Basically, what happened in this fourth season of Homeland was that the show was able to completely re-invent itself on the fly. For the first two seasons, the show is an intense character drama revolving around Carrie & Brody, with the political landscape of international terrorism in the background. That arc stutter-steps to a close in the third season, and the door is slammed shut when Brody is hanging from a rope in the finale. What happens in this fourth season, though, is that the political drama comes from and center while the characters slide to the background just a bit. Not to say that there isn't intense character drama at times, but the "front lines" of the war on terrorism are showcased more during this campaign. One HUGE reason why this season impressed me so much, specifically, was the growth of Peter Quinn's character. Carrie & Saul are such good characters that they practically write themselves, but Quinn was a breath of fresh air into the character storylines. Overall, then, I was very surprised that I enjoyed this season as much as I did. I even thoroughly enjoyed a rather strange finale that many viewers did not like, but to me really set up the stage for a Season Five that could potentially be just as interesting as this one. Bottom line: I came into Season Four expecting absolutely nothing. I came out with my interest in Homeland totally revived.
  • Nov 13, 2016
    A massive improvement over Season 3.
  • May 17, 2016
    This review is mostly a tale of disappointment. I had high hopes for season 4, and nearly all were were nothing. First of all, this season was a big let-down. After 3 interesting years of filming and production, some more than others, I had high hopes. But the story's focus was changed far too drastically, and after the incredible, exciting, and for some obviously sad ending of season 3, there were certain expectations. Much like the star character, Carrie, the series was all over the place this time, and I was ready to stop watching. However, parts of the plot did speak to my curiosity. The show that once rose to the occasion of being bigger and better than it's origin, now became just that. Raw and underdeveloped. But I found myself forgetting the parts about Pakistan, days after watching it. On the other hand, I remembered Brody's story for months after watching it. This season is badly written, and the actors play a big part in saving it. The relative success can be attributed to the cast in general, and the stars in particular. Danes and Patinkin help keep the story alive, and finally drive it home. The last episodes were far more interesting than the early ones, and in the last third of the season, the show came to make some sense again. At times, it became so realistic it was no longer entertaining. As a person who knows a thing or two about the intelligence community, I was bored. And then I was not. Patinkin and Danes kept me watching, and I imagine many viewer tuned in for the same reason. The action packed cliff hangers were nearly gone, replaced with politic themed peaks, not too exciting. Even with the improvement and exciting finish, this season just barely rose to the simple grade of B, barely enough to draw me in for season five.

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