The Andy Griffith Show: Season 7 (1966 - 1967)


Season 7
The Andy Griffith Show

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Episodes

Air date: Sep 12, 1966

Season Seven of The Andy Griffith Show commenced on September 12, 1966, with the episode titled "Opie's Girlfriend." Slated to entertain Helen's niece Cynthia (Mary Ann Durkin), Opie is sorely aggrieved that the girl turns out to be smarter than he is-and a better athlete to boot! Sensing that Cynthia is fond of Opie, Helen imparts a bit of womanly wisdom to the girl. "Opie's Girlfriend" was written by Budd Grossman.

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Air date: Sep 19, 1966

Andy nominates Howard Sprague for membership in the Regal Order of Good Fellowship. Thanks to the intervention of Howard's domineering mother (Mabel Albertson), Goober is persuaded to blackball the hapless Mr. Sprague. This episode was written by Jim Parker and Arnold Margolin, later two of the leading lights of the comedy anthology Love, American Style. "The Lodge" originally aired on September 19, 1966.

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Air date: Sep 26, 1966

Andy hopes to beat his longtime rival Sheriff Blake (Ken Mayer) at the Mount Pilot Sheriff's Annual Barbershop Quartet Sing-Off. Unfortunately, on the eve of the contest, Mayberry's star tenor Howard gets laryngitis. A desperate Andy finds an unexpected replacement in the form of golden-throated Jeff Nelson (Hamilton Camp)-who happens to be a prisoner in the Mayberry jailhouse. First telecast on September 26, 1966, "The Barbershop Quartet" was written by Fred S. Fox.

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Air date: Oct 3, 1966

Andy is elected to umpire that championship Little League game between Mayberry and Mount Pilot. Exercising fine impartiality, Andy calls his own son Opie out, then promptly gets it in the neck from everyone in town. Ultimately, Andy is redeemed by Howard Sprague's newspaper sports column, but camera-bug Helen discovers the story isn't quite over yet. This episode was cowritten by Sid Morse and Rance Howard, the father of series regular Ronny Howard. "The Ball Game" first aired on October 3, 1966.

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Air date: Oct 10, 1966

Preparing for a visit from Mayberry's guest minister Rev. Leighton (Ian Wolfe), Aunt Bee worries that her natural hair-do won't survive the night. Thus, she quickly dons an attractive blonde wig, which duly impresses the visiting cleric. The problem: Aunt Bee grows fond of the minister, and hasn't the nerve to tell him that she isn't a natural blonde. The most amusing aspect of this episode is the fact that supporting actor Ian Wolfe is rather obviously wearing a "rug" himself! First shown on October 10, 1966, "Aunt Bee's Crowning Glory" was written by Ronald Axe.

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Air date: Oct 17, 1966

Once again, the hillbilly Darling family storms into Mayberry. With a fortune in hand-nearly three hundred dollars, cash!-Briscoe Darling (Denver Pyle) has come to town looking for brides for his goonish sons. Acting upon an old mountain superstition, the boys all choose the first woman they see walking down the street-who turns out be Andy's sweetheart Helen. Written by Jim Parker and Arnold Margolin, "The Darling Fortune" was originally telecast on October 17, 1966.

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Air date: Oct 31, 1966

As a result of a minor auto accident, Goober suffers a slight pain in the back. Thanks to garrulous barber Floyd, Goober becomes convinced that he has incurred a serious injury-and that he is in fact at death's door! Retreating to the bedroom of Andy Taylor, Goober refuses to allow anyone to convince him that he's as hale and hearty as ever. Andy is forced to resort to trickery to get Goober back on his feet again. First telecast on October 31, 1966, "Mind Over Matter" was written by Ron Friedman and Pat McCormick.

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Air date: Nov 7, 1966

Andy asks for it when he talks Howard into running for town council. It seems that Aunt Bee is dissatisfied with the local political scene, and has been persuaded to run for council herself. The battle royal culminates in a public debate, wherein Aunt Bee's "will of the people" platform doesn't stand much of a chance against Howard's common sense and civic knowhow. Written by Fred S. Fox, "Politics Begin at Home" first aired on November 7, 1966. Though it was the 200th episode of The Andy Griffith Show, it was only the 197th to be aired.

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Air date: Nov 14, 1966

Chosen to direct the senior high school play, Helen allows the kids to dance the Watusi during one of the production numbers. As a result, the show is closed down by ultra-conservative Principal Hampton (Leon Ames), who considers the production too "revolutionary". Helen retaliates with a new play which proves that Hampton's generation was considered pretty radical in itstime. First shown on November 14, 1966, "The Senior Play" was written by Sid Morse.

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Air date: Nov 21, 1966

Opie and his friend Anold (Sheldon Golomb) find an abandoned baby. Hoping to save the child from an orphanage, the boys try to find a new home for the abandonee on their own. And then the real parents show up in Mayberry. Jack Nicholson makes the first of two Andy Griffith Show appearances in the role of Mr. Garland. Written by Stan Dreben and Sid Mandel, "Opie Finds a Baby" originally aired on November 21, 1966.

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