The Bob Newhart Show: Season 5 (1976 - 1977)


Season 5
The Bob Newhart Show

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Episodes

Air date: Sep 25, 1976

Although the opening episode of The Bob Newhart Show's fifth season was not the first of that season to be filmed, "Enter Mrs. Peeper" was a logical extension of the final episode of season four. Tom Poston makes another appearance as Bob's fun-loving college buddy, Cliff Murdock, aka "the Peeper." Having remarried, Cliff insists that he's a changed man. Jean Palmerton appears as Corinee Murdock, with Charles Thomas Murphy as the messenger and series story consultant Jay Tarses as the waiter. Written by Gordon and Lynne Farr, "Enter Mrs. Peeper" originally aired on September 25, 1976.

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Air date: Oct 2, 1976

In anticipation of Howard's big Fourth of July Bicentennial celebration, Bob and Emily scurry down to the basement storage locker to get supplies. Alas, Emily locks both herself and Bob into the locker -- and there they remain until July 5th. This minor mishap has major repercussions on the Hartleys' relationship. Will Mackenzie makes another appearance as Carol's husband, Larry Bondurant. Written by Gordon and Lynne Farr, "Caged Fury" first aired on October 2, 1976.

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Air date: Oct 9, 1976

Future WKRP in Cincinnati regular Howard Hesseman makes a return appearance on The Bob Newhart Show, this time in the role of Bob's new patient, Mr. Plager. Described as "mildly neurotic with compulsive tendencies," Plager is welcomed by the rest of Bob's therapy group with open arms. Alas, those arms quickly fold up when it is learned that Plager is gay. Written by Patricia Jones, "Some of My Best Friends Are..." first aired on October 16, 1976, as the series' 100th episode.

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Air date: Oct 16, 1976

About to embark upon an out-of-town trip, Bob tries to divest himself of the dependent Howard by foisting his friend off on a fellow psychologist, Dr. Ned Podbillion (Leonard Stone), whose unorthodox methods invariably yield positive results. Upon his return, Bob is confronted by the new Howard -- and he's not altogether delighted with what he sees. This episode was the return of future WKRP in Cincinnati maven Hugh Wilson. "Still Crazy After All These Years" originally aired on October 9, 1976.

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Air date: Oct 29, 1976

Bob is none too happy by the service in his apartment -- or rather, the lack of service. Fed up with a furnace that won't heat and faulty plumbing, Bob stages a sit-in on the behalf of his beleaguered fellow tenants. The crisis is compounded when Bob's most neurotic patient, Mr. Carlin, purchases the apartment complex. Written by David Lloyd, "The Great Rent Strike" made its first network appearance on October 23, 1976.

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Air date: Oct 30, 1976

This week, Bob is besieged from all sides. Not only is Carol threatening to give notice to two of her four bosses, but Howard has given Bob a bad-taste gift -- and he expects to be praised for his largesse. Completing the canvas is the unscheduled appearance of a human fly. Shirley O'Hara appears as Debbie Flett. Written by Gary David Goldberg of Family Ties fame, "Et Tu, Carol?" originally aired on October 30, 1976, as the final episode in The Bob Newhart Show's familiar 9:30 p.m. Saturday time slot; thereafter, the series would be shown one hour earlier.

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Air date: Nov 6, 1976

Written by David Lloyd, this episode finds Bob, Jerry, and Howard volunteering to lead a brace of orphans on a rugged camping trip. Their long journey ends with but a single step, as the heroes set up camp in a Chicago parking lot. Also appearing are Sorrell Booke as Perlmutter, Michael Le Clair as Phil Dorigo, Tierre Turner as Wally Carson, and Fil Formicola as the Man at the Elevator. The first Bob Newhart Show to air in the series' earlier 8:30 p.m. Saturday time slot, "Send This Boy to Camp" was originally broadcast on November 6, 1976.

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Air date: Nov 13, 1976

Bob turns amateur detective when his expensive new tape recorder turns up missing. Deducing that there's a thief at large, Bob places everyone -- friends and family members alike -- under suspicion. But the solution to the mystery is embarrassingly close to home. Originally shown over the CBS network on November 13, 1976, "A Crime Most Foul" was one of several Bob Newhart Show episodes written by veteran comedy scrivener, Sy Rosen.

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Air date: Nov 20, 1976

Bob accepts the invitation of his pal, Cliff Murdock (Tom Poston), to revisit a bar that they both frequented in their college days. Alas, times have changed, and the bar has a distinctly seedy-looking clientele. Worse still, Bob and Cliff try to purchase basketball tickets from a brace of sexy girls -- who, revealing themselves to be undercover policewomen, place the heroes under arrest. Featured in the cast are Bobby Ramsen as Johnny Carson Jr. (sic), Kim O'Brien as Kim, Lucy Lee Flippin as Darva, Jean Palmerton as Corinne, David Himes as the detective, and Rhodes Reason as the patron. Written by Gordon and Lynne Farr, "The Slammer" first aired on November 20, 1976.

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Air date: Nov 27, 1976

Reaping a huge sum of money from an earlier investment, Jerry sells his practice and retires. Unfortunately, Bob is unable to enjoy Jerry's retirement, fearing that a life of leisure has transformed his best friend into a bum. Also appearing are John Randolph as Bob's father-in-law, Junior Harrison, and comedian/director Howard Morris as Shorty Vance. Written by Hugh Wilson, "Jerry's Retirement" originally aired on November 27, 1976.

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