Christopher Hudson Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Christopher Hudson

Christopher Hudson
Christopher Hudson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
89% The Candidate (1972) [The Candidate] is the best film about American electioneering politics since The President's Analyst.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Blanche (2014) The grave and measured unfolding of the tragedy, the remoteness of the setting and the beautiful, precise camerawork add up to something more sinister, an enigma rich and indecipherable.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
No Score Yet Hitler: The Last Ten Days (1973) [Hitler: The Last Ten Days] offers neither instruction nor entertainment.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
46% Man of La Mancha (1973) For the most part [Peter O'Toole] and Sophia Loren as Dulcinea fight the unwinnable fight against the assassins of Cervantes's reputation.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
82% Fiddler on the Roof (1971) All I can say is that a very good stage show has, for me, been transformed into an equally good work of cinema.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
97% Play It Again, Sam (1972) Play It Again, Sam, is another demonstration of the comedian's self-obsessed, self-abusive humour. It is almost continuously funny in a brittle way. But the sour, allusive, intellectual witticisms begin to lose their pith‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
95% Jeremiah Johnson (1972) Anyone who likes looking at Robert Redford or mountain landscapes or both will be very happy.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
90% Walkabout (1971) Walkabout has a good script by Edward Bond, and is directed and stunningly photographed by Nicolas Roeg.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2016
78% Twins of Evil (1971) Part of the fascination lies in the variations on the familiar typology.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2016
80% Hands of the Ripper (1971) Part of the fascination lies in the variations on the familiar typology.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2016
86% The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971) No film can be all bad which opens in a vast Art Deco chamber... with Vincent Price, masked, cloaked and hooded, rising out of the floor at the keyboard of a Wurlitzer organ playing Cole Porter melodies.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2016
No Score Yet Beyond The Law (1968) There is a perfectly sensible massacre at the end, with Lionel Stander, here a decayed preacher, giving one of his gruesome dying performances which anyone who saw Polanski's Cul-de-Sac will remember him for.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2016
66% Live and Let Die (1973) As fastpaced and snappily entertaining a piece of claptrap as we have a right to expect.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2015
No Score Yet A Doll's House (1973) The photography is superb (the Norwegian setting makes little difference to either play), and Losey's direction is marred only by an occasional over-insistence in the editing.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2015
96% Don't Look Now (1973) Roeg's expertly conceived visual metaphors sustain a powerful foreboding.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2015
No Score Yet The Adventures of Barry McKenzie (1972) The film is a humdinger, not to be missed.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2015
91% A Touch of Class (1973) [Glenda Jackson] is a rivetingly good actress, able to turn the shallowly-defined character of Melvin Frank's screenplay into a woman of some depth and complexity.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Sep 27, 2015
82% Papillon (1973) Papillon was not a complicated man but his experiences changed him almost beyond recognition, and McQueen does a good job of portraying the survivor, broken in body, but not in spirit.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Sep 23, 2015
71% The Offence (1973) A great disappointment.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 12, 2015
40% Savages (1972) The film, within its own limited and minor ambitions, succeeds admirably.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 12, 2015
No Score Yet The Salzburg Connection (1972) Steer a very wide berth.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 12, 2015
73% The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1974) Easily the best of the Christmas films for children and an exciting film for anyone to see.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2015
43% The Day of the Dolphin (1973) Very disappointing.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2015
93% The Sting (1973) It is a sparkling film, an American Borsalino, with sharp, clever dialogue, directed at a fine pace and with a good eye for period detail by George Roy Hill.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2015
100% I Clowns (The Clowns) (2001) [An] undeniably beautiful film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2015
44% Young Winston (1972) John Mills, Edward Woodward, Patrick Magee, Robert Hardy, Anthony, Hopkins and a string of well-known names in small parts keep the standard of acting agreeably high.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2015
No Score Yet Murder Czech Style (1966) Murder Czech Style is a quietly humorous (all Czech films seem to be quietly humorous) story of an insignicant accounts clerk who murders for love of a beautiful woman.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2015
78% El Topo (1970) Forget about the cosmic significance: it is the work of a talented film-maker, and full of memorable scenes.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2015
98% The Godfather (1972) It is a long (three hours), often exciting and always well-directed film about the struggle for survival of one of the five Mafia 'families,' the Corleones, in late 1940s New York.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2015
38% The Great Gatsby (1974) It is not a great film: but in capturing so much as a glimmer from the iridescence of the original, it becomes well worth seeing.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2015
22% Diary of Forbidden Dreams (1973) The dialogue is as limp as the reactions of its audience are likely to be, and the only mystery is why an immensely talented film-maker like Polanski should have turned his finger to it.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2015
93% Theater of Blood (Theatre of Blood) (Much Ado About Murder) (1973) The film somehow fails to take wing, even into the positively humble, low-lying purlieus of British domestic farce.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2002