Frank S. Nugent Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Frank S. Nugent

Frank S. Nugent
Frank S. Nugent's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New York Times

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet The Walking Dead (1936) Horror pictures are a staple commodity, and this one was taken from one of the better shelves.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2016
75% Heroes for Sale (1933) Many a mystery is less bewildering than Heroes for Sale, which was not intended as a puzzler at all.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2014
91% You Can't Take It With You (1938) It's a grand picture.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 13, 2014
3.5/5 No Score Yet Here Comes the Navy (1934) A fast-moving comedy enriched by an authentic naval setting.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 31, 2012
4/5 100% The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936) An excellent biography, just as it is a notable photoplay, dignified in subject, dramatic in treatment and brilliantly played by Paul Muni, Fritz Leiber, Josephine Hutchinson and many other members of the cast.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2011
100% Pinocchio (1940) It still is the best thing Mr. Disney has done and therefore the best cartoon ever made.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 10, 2008
3.5/5 No Score Yet Louise (1940) It is not at all likely that Louise will revolutionize either the operatic stage or the motion picture, but it is shorter than the opera, and the general public will find it a lot easier to sit through.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2007
92% Things to Come (1936) Things to Come is an unusual picture, a fantasy, if you will, with overtones of the Buck Rogers and Flash Gordon comic strips. But it is, as well, a picture with ideas which have been expressed dramatically and with visual fascination.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 31, 2007
3.5/5 80% Front Page Woman (1935) If you will keep in mind that this portrayal of newspaper work is a wee bit on the whimsy side, then Front Page Woman can be recommended as a downright amusing photoplay.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2007
100% The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) Another astonishing chapter in the career of the Monster.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
88% Wild Boys of the Road (Dangerous Days) (1933) Wild Boys of the Road... is disappointing, primarily because it might have been so much more than it is.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
63% The Invisible Ray (1936) As the story unreels, you realize that this is just another case of a man's manager bringing him along too fast. It is no wonder Karloff's mind cracks under the strain.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
87% The Devil-Doll (1936) Not since The Lost World, King Kong and The Invisible Man have the camera wizards enjoyed such a field day.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
3.5/5 79% Mark of the Vampire (1935) Like most good ghost stories, it's a lot of fun, even though you don't believe a word of it.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
2.5/5 71% Un grand amour de Beethoven (The Life and Loves of Beethoven) (1937) t upsets me just the same to see the musical cart hitched before the cinema horse and then be constrained to admit it was probably for the best.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 8, 2006
4.5/5 100% The Spy in Black (1939) U-Boat 29 is the most exciting spy melodrama since the advent of the Second World War.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
2/5 13% Anthony Adverse (1936) We found it a bulky, rambling and indecisive photoplay which has not merely taken liberties with the letter of the original but with its spirit.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
2.5/5 29% Bluebeard's Eighth Wife (1938) Although it's not a bad comedy by our current depressed standards, it has the dickens of a time trying to pass off Gary Cooper as a multi-marrying millionaire.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
4/5 100% Sabotage (1937) We won't tell you what happens. That would be to cheat Mr. Hitchcock of his just reward, but it is a warning what you may expect -- which, as is the way of all Hitchcock melodramas, is the unexpected.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
3.5/5 93% La BĂȘte Humaine (Judas Was a Woman)(The Human Beast) (1938) It is simply a story; a macabre, grim and oddly-fascinating story.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
80% The Man They Could Not Hang (1939) If you don't know Mr. Karloff by this time, we will explain: He is the man whose funerals are never final. You lay a wreath on Boris in one corner and he is certain to appear in another, full of obscure, graveyard resentment.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
82% The Invisible Man Returns (1940) The Invisible Man Returns is a mite on the ghostly side, too, although neither so horrendous nor so humorous as the first one was.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
4/5 90% Come and Get It (1936) Although there is nothing new in the theme, it has been simply and powerfully expressed by a number of admirable performances, and it has been played against an interesting background.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
5/5 100% Modern Times (1936) Do you have to be reminded that Chaplin is a master of pantomime? Time has not changed his genius.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
4/5 100% After the Thin Man (1936) If After the Thin Man is not quite the delight The Thin Man was, it is, at the very least, one of the most urbane comedies of the season.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
3.5/5 No Score Yet That Certain Age (1938) Gentle but highly effective.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
90% The Story Of A Cheat (1936) A witty, impudent, morally subversive show which every one should see for his own content and out of sheer curiosity about the kind of fellow who is not satisfied with writing, directing and starring in a picture, but must play seven [roles] as well.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
3.5/5 100% Elephant Boy (1937) The film moves leisurely, but with rare charm and visual interest.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
55% Jamaica Inn (1939) Having set his own standards, Alfred Hitchcock must be judged by them; and, by them, his Jamaica Inn is merely journeyman melodrama.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
3/5 81% Another Thin Man (1939) We're still appreciative, but we found too many chestnuts in the dressing.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2006
2/5 88% La Marseillaise (1937) It is probably the least dramatic film ever made about one of the most dramatic events in history -- the French Revolution.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2006
4.5/5 96% Port of Shadows (Le Quai des Brumes) (2012) It's a thorough-going study in blacks and grays, without a free laugh in it; but it is also a remarkably beautiful motion picture from the purely pictorial standpoint and a strangely haunting drama.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2006
4/5 100% Young and Innocent (1938) Alfred Hitchcock, England's jovial and rotund master of melodrama, has turned out another crisply paced, excellently performed film.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2006
4.5/5 100% Remember the Night (1940) Perhaps this is a bit too early in the season to be talking of the best pictures of 1940; it is not too early to say that Paramount's nomination is worth considering.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2006
4.5/5 91% Camille (1936) Miss Garbo has interpreted Marguerite Gautier with the subtlety that has earned for her the title, 'first lady of the screen.'‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2004
3/5 97% La Grande illusion (Grand Illusion) (1938) Renoir has created a strange and interesting film, but he owes much to his cast.‐ New York Times
Posted Jun 12, 2003
100% Rebecca (1940) An altogether brilliant film, haunting, suspenseful, handsome and handsomely played.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
98% Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) It is a classic, as important cinematically as The Birth of a Nation or the birth of Mickey Mouse.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
98% The Lady Vanishes (1938) Just in under the wire to challenge for a place on the year's best ten is The Lady Vanishes, latest of the melodramatic classics made by England's greatest director, Alfred Hitchcock.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
4/5 100% My Man Godfrey (1936) There may be a sober moment or two in the picture; there may be a few lines of the script that do not pack a laugh. Somehow we cannot remember them.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
98% His Girl Friday (1940) It takes you by the scruff of the neck in the first reel and it shakes you madly, bellowing hoarsely the. while, for the remaining six or seven. Before it's over you don't know whether you have been laughing or having your ears boxed.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
95% Bringing Up Baby (1938) If you've never been to the movies, Bringing Up Baby will be all new to you -- a zany-ridden product of the goofy farce school. But who hasn't been to the movies?‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
99% The Wizard of Oz (1939) A delightful piece of wonder-working which had the youngsters' eyes shining and brought a quietly amused gleam to the wiser ones of the oldsters.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
5/5 100% Stagecoach (1939) John Ford has swept aside ten years of artifice and talkie compromise and has made a motion picture that sings a song of camera.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
65% The Great Ziegfeld (1936) If the picture overcrowds its screen, at least we must admit it is an impressive kaleidoscope; and probably nothing short of that could reflect the gaudy career of America's foremost showman.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
5/5 100% The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) Few storybooks have been more brilliantly brought to life, page for page, chapter for chapter, derring-do for derring-do.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
4/5 94% Pygmalion (1938) Pygmalion is good Shaw and a grand show.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
5/5 94% Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) Mr. Smith is one of the best shows of the year. More fun, even, than the Senate itself.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
5/5 94% The Good Earth (1937) Once again Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer has enriched the screen with a superb translation of a literary classic.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003
75% The Life of Emile Zola (1937) A great and valuable and stirring film document.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 20, 2003