Iris Barry Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Iris Barry

Iris Barry
Iris Barry's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Hotel Imperial (1927) [The producers] worship a minor deity called "box-office appeal," which demands that every film should have a stereotyped happy ending, however improbable.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
No Score Yet The Goose Hangs High (1925) One of those satisfyingly Ordinary American films of domestic life.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
100% The Kid (1921) Beyond its ability to wring the heart, The Kid of all Chaplin's pictures perhaps most manifests his extraordinary knowledge of life, which his sensitive perceptions and comic imagination use as the raw material for laughter.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
100% Grass (1925) [A] marvelously well-photographed record of human life in outlying parts of the world.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
82% Moana (1926) A delight.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
100% Greed (1925) On behalf of the minority of film-goers who will, however even they may be shocked by [Erich von Stroheim's] fierce realism, perceive that he has made here a masterpiece in quite a new manner, one feels inclined to thank him.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet Warning Shadows (1922) I would boldly urge all unbelievers to see it.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
99% Metropolis (1927) The cinema, even here at its best, and full as it is of invention and thrill, is still only at the mental age of seventeen.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet What Price Glory (1926) What Price Glory comes out in spots of sobbing sentiment now and then, is very slow in places... [but] it contains the incredibly convincing performances of Victor McLaglan and Edmund Lowe as the two soldier-heroes, and occasionally it has greatness.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% Peter Pan (1924) A refreshing and welcome film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet Isn't Life Wonderful (1924) It is always painful to have to abandon an article of faith; but, frankly, I can no longer hope that Griffith will produce another good film. There only remains gratitude for his achievements in the past.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% The Last Laugh (Der Letzte Mann) (1925) The Last Laugh is a progress: it is not parasitic on any novel or play, does not resemble any literary form at all. It contains one of the finest pieces of sustained character-acting yet seen.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% The Big Parade (1925) There is a peculiar delight in sitting through a play in which every dialectic skill is used -- where the aptness of language to express character, emotion, the interplay of thoughts gives one a pure joy.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
82% Sally of the Sawdust (1925) Griffith again lays on the mother-sentiment too thickly in places. But, all in all, Sally of the Sawdust is good entertainment.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet Don Q Son of Zorro (1925) This plot simply exists to create difficulties for the athletic Fairbanks to overcome... His movements are almost poetically graceful, and what is more they are infused with a light spirit of comedy. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% The Gold Rush (1925) Let no one fail to appreciate those small details, of [Chaplin's] perfectly timed and quite exquisite acting, as when he has most kindly boiled one of his famous boots for a starving miner-pal, and serves it up after due testing with a fork.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
57% America (1924) The film itself is ordinary, and shows hardly any trace of the largeness and sensitiveness of vision that made The Birth of a Nation and Intolerance the two finest American films produced in ten years.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2015