Joshua Brunsting

Joshua Brunsting
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
Josh is Chief Critic for The CriterionCast, a member of the Online Film Critics Society, a wrestling nerd, a hip-hop head, a father, a cinephile and a man looking to make his stamp on the world, one word at a time.
Publications: The CriterionCast

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
95% Les Vampires (1915) Seemingly taking the technology and style of the day, and pushing it to its absolute max, there are aesthetic touches within this series that feel as vibrant as anything today. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 15, 2019
85% Her Smell (2019) It's almost as if Moss were a star of the silent era, giving a performance of such bombastic physicality that it makes Her Smell something entirely fresh and captivating. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2019
79% The Wind (2019) Tammi's direction is mature and nuanced, with a keen eye not just to the world this woman inhabits, but the existential terror that hides behind every branch breaking. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2019
99% Amazing Grace (2019) Living in this world for roughly 90 minutes is a thrilling experience. Pollack's camera is unwavering, capturing even the smallest of gestures or glances... - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2019
73% Suburban Birds (Jiao qu de niao) (2019) Clocking in at just a pinch under two hours, the film does somewhat meander but ultimately this becomes as powerful a look at urbanization as there's been in quite some time. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2019
84% Knife + Heart (Un couteau dans le coeur) (2019) Gorgeously shot and directed with an energy and vitality all its own, this is one of the great discoveries of 2019, a film that subverts all of its influences to make something wholly original. A true gem of a film. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2019
98% Ash Is Purest White (2019) Ash sees Zhangke at the very height of his powers, telling this tale of love and loss with a scale fitting of the runtime and an economy that gives urgency to each scene. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2019
85% The Graduation (Le concours) (2016) ...watching titans of the French film upper class dissect young men and women through brief interviews and a series of strange tests is fascinating and incredibly provocative. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2019
100% Wrestle (2019) Like the best sports films, the sport itself is window dressing, window dressing drawing the eye into a fascinating rumination on race and class in modern day America. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2019
93% Hotel by the River (2019) Hotel By The River is one of Hong Sang-soo's most mature and emotionally rich films, a black and white drama as intellectually rich as it is visually jaw-dropping - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2019
94% Birds of Passage (Pájaros de verano) (2019) Changing pace from Embrace of the Serpent, Guerra and Gallego have crafted a nuanced depiction of capitalism's corruptive DNA and a film that subverts all expectations - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2019
81% The Gospel of Eureka (2019) Brisk and propulsive, Mosher and Palmieri pace the film perfectly, getting across their point with economy and startling humanity. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 8, 2019
81% Daughter of Mine (Figlia mia) (2019) A brilliant follow up to Bispuri's ambitious debut, Daughter of Mine is an expertly crafted, richly told meditation on mother/daughter dynamics and what those roles truly mean - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2019
94% The Wild Pear Tree (Ahlat agaci) (2019) A devastatingly political work, this is a quietly told film about father/son dynamics that uses sudden bursts of surrealism to become something quietly revolutionary. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2019
71% Piercing (2019) It's impossible not to describe the film as expertly made, but there's little "there" there. Its examination of trauma and grief isn't entirely inspired and feels oddly empty. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2019
88% The Image Book (Le livre d'image) (2019) This is a dense film that has the structure of an essay picture, the tone of a dystopian thriller, the scope of a history book. Free association on mescaline. Brilliant. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2019
95% What Is Democracy? (2019) Taylor's film is an energetic one, styled as a typical issue picture, but willingness to open a dialogue that's refreshing and intellectually energizing. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2019
97% The Heiresses (Las Herederas) (2019) It's in its balancing of emotional artistry and nuanced political musing that makes The Heiresses a breath of fresh air. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2019
100% Shiraz (1928) Featuring a new score from beloved artist Anoushka Shanka, Shiraz is a grand epic that features production design and direction that's unlike anything from this time period. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2019
79% Buffalo Boys (2019) Opposite the film's clear-eyed and deeply angry ruminating on colonialism, the flatness of the narrative emotionally makes this a bizarrely off-kilter viewing experience. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 13, 2019
66% Vice (2018) It's not that the film is "dim," but it simply plays like a relic that's maybe a decade old, simply elevated by some above-average acting and a rarely better Amy Adams. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 28, 2018
92% Cold War (Zimna wojna) (2018) A film about a doomed romance, Cold War is a haunting portrait of love during wartime, a love that's maybe not meant to be but utterly, cosmically, inescapable. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2018
93% Searching for Ingmar Bergman (Ingmar Bergman - Vermächtnis eines Jahrhundertgenies) (2018) Margarethe von Trotta's new documentary is a handsome, if occasionally thin, look at the work and life of one of cinema's great artists. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 14, 2018
92% Life and Nothing More (La Vida y Nada Más) (2018) A powerful, potent and poignant look at race, class and family in today's America, director Esparza has crafted a superlative, naturalistic drama - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 14, 2018
100% Khrustalyov, mashinu! (Khrustalyov, My Car!) (1998) This is a film of spit and paranoia, a truly raw satire that looks even better than it did 20 years ago thanks to a loving, new restoration. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 14, 2018
100% Dead Souls (2018) An incredibly guilt-ridden film, the experience of surviving such a traumatic, world-shattering trauma is squarely on the film's mind, turning Wang Bing's latest film into a harrowing masterpiece. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 14, 2018
99% Shoplifters (Manbiki kazoku) (2018) Shoplifters finds Kore-eda at his most human and humane, painting a tender yet unflinching look at the life of a family society has more or less forgotten. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 8, 2018
100% Alanis (2017) Alanis is a gorgeous, humanist motion picture, a film that uses rich photography full of texture to paint a portrait of life on the periphery of society. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 8, 2018