Joshua Brunsting

Joshua Brunsting
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
Josh is Chief Critic for The CriterionCast, a member of the Online Film Critics Society, a wrestling nerd, a hip-hop head, a father, a cinephile and a man looking to make his stamp on the world, one word at a time.
Publications: The CriterionCast

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
A- 83% The Original Kings of Comedy (2000) Ostensibly a shot performance of a comedians Steve Harvey, D.L. Hughley, Bernie Mac and Cedric The Entertainer, the film is not only genuinely funny, but also very much a cultural touchstone. - Movie Mezzanine EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
93% Sword of Trust (2019) Arguably a bit thin, this is otherwise a charming, beautifully made comedy with a career-defining performance from co-star Marc Maron. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
83% The Art of Self-Defense (2019) Everything Stearns' script says about masculinity and gender dynamics is superficial and rudimentary, with few actual biting laughs amidst a film that's limp emotionally. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
78% A Faithful Man (L'homme fidèle) (2019) A typically French three hander, this romantic comedy/drama takes three ace performances and turns them into a knotty web of romantic farce that, at 75 minutes, is captivating - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
No Score Yet Birthday Wonderland (2019) Legendary filmmaker Keiichi Hara returns with a gorgeous, if aggressively uneven, fairy-tale that's rich with style but a bit thin on thematic texture. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
86% We Are Little Zombies (2019) This debut feature film is an inspired and beautifully rendered rumination on grief through the eyes of four orphan children. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
86% The Great Hack (2019) Now available on Netflix, this new documentary looks at the state of data as a commodity in the modern age, yet does so in an incredibly simple, seemingly disposable manner - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
95% The Gangster, the Cop, the Devil (2019) With an incomparable, classically brutish lead performance, Lee Won-Tae's latest effort is a simply told, thrilling action film, a rarity in 2019 cinema. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
65% The Mountain (2019) Rick Alverson returns with a jaundiced look at 50s Americana which, with a collection of show-stealing performances, is one of the year's best films. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
100% House of Hummingbird (Beolsae) (2018) Bora Kim's debut film is one of the most exciting discoveries of this year's Fantasia International Film Festival, a tender and moving coming of age drama above reproach - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
93% Wild Rose (2019) There's a looseness to the film that's rare for this genre, turning what could be a slight rise-to-stardom film into something that pops off the screen and demands attention. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
96% The Edge of Democracy (2019) Costa's personal, unforgettable rumination on modern Brazilian politics is now on Netflix and is one of the great political documentaries of 2019. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
97% Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (2019) Director Greenfield-Sanders crafts a documentary that's almost claustrophobic in its structure and form, a film that's reverence for its subject fosters pure hagiography. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
87% Ever After (Endzeit) (2019) Between the performances and a director who embeds the film with an entrancing blending of genre and atmosphere, Ever After is a gorgeously made, impeccably acted, drama - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
75% Halston (2019) Much too long, Tcheng's latest documentary is thin on content despite having a fascinating structure. Fine, but forgettable and frustratingly disposable. Fast fashion as film. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
88% The Raft (2019) The Raft is a strange, oddly engrossing piece of non-fiction filmmaking, a film that has the atmosphere of a true crime thriller and the style of a von Trier film. A doozy. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
77% Leto (2019) Leto is a gorgeous, endlessly charming romance drama that's part jukebox musical and part anthropological document. With revolution on the periphery, Leto is a superb picture. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
33% Domino (2019) Iconic filmmaker Brian De Palma is a fascinating, often frustrating master who has made a fascinating, often frustrating thriller. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
98% Too Late to Die Young (Tarde para morir joven) (2019) It's a film that plays like a dream remembered, floating in and out of lives and conversations, having both a warmth and, come the final act, a shattering sense of reality that leaves the viewer utterly shellshocked. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
83% Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation (2019) Despite being yet another documentary about Woodstock, this becomes an essential document of the festival through its access to never-before-seen footage. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
100% Barbara Rubin & the Exploding NY Underground (2019) It may be much too short, but pound for pound, minute for minute, there are few biographical documentaries more impressive than this. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
100% The Proposal (2019) A captivating rumination on ownership and democracy within the art world, The Proposal is as entrancing a documentary as there has been yet in 2019. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
90% Walking on Water (2019) Walking On Water is an evocative meditation on one man's creative process and one that's as captivating to watch as it is provocative to think about. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
100% The Wandering Soap Opera (La Telenovela Errante) (2019) Finished by Sarmiento after Ruiz's passing, The Wandering Soap Opera is a thrilling work, an experiment in genre that evolves into something intensely surreal and political. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
78% Pasolini (2019) The first of four films released theatrically this year from director Abel Ferrara, Pasolini is a deeply moving look at a legendary film revolutionary. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
95% Grass (2019) Hong Sang-soo returns with his 22nd film, a masterpiece that turns a simple, almost theater-like premise into an ambulatory rumination on life and death. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
96% Little Woods (2019) DaCosta's feature debut is impressive and quite promising. Driven by a towering performance from one of today's great performers, Little Woods is a tense neo-Western/thriller. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
46% Quartet (2019) More or less a romance picture, Quartet is a taut, tense and breathtaking tale of deception and power dynamics, a costume drama with the energy of something more erotic. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted May 3, 2019
95% Les Vampires (1915) Seemingly taking the technology and style of the day, and pushing it to its absolute max, there are aesthetic touches within this series that feel as vibrant as anything today. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 15, 2019
83% Her Smell (2019) It's almost as if Moss were a star of the silent era, giving a performance of such bombastic physicality that it makes Her Smell something entirely fresh and captivating. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2019
80% The Wind (2019) Tammi's direction is mature and nuanced, with a keen eye not just to the world this woman inhabits, but the existential terror that hides behind every branch breaking. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2019
99% Amazing Grace (2019) Living in this world for roughly 90 minutes is a thrilling experience. Pollack's camera is unwavering, capturing even the smallest of gestures or glances... - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2019
79% Suburban Birds (Jiao qu de niao) (2019) Clocking in at just a pinch under two hours, the film does somewhat meander but ultimately this becomes as powerful a look at urbanization as there's been in quite some time. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2019
81% Knife + Heart (Un couteau dans le coeur) (2019) Gorgeously shot and directed with an energy and vitality all its own, this is one of the great discoveries of 2019, a film that subverts all of its influences to make something wholly original. A true gem of a film. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2019
99% Ash Is Purest White (2019) Ash sees Zhangke at the very height of his powers, telling this tale of love and loss with a scale fitting of the runtime and an economy that gives urgency to each scene. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2019
86% The Graduation (Le concours) (2016) ...watching titans of the French film upper class dissect young men and women through brief interviews and a series of strange tests is fascinating and incredibly provocative. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2019
100% Wrestle (2019) Like the best sports films, the sport itself is window dressing, window dressing drawing the eye into a fascinating rumination on race and class in modern day America. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2019
93% Hotel by the River (2019) Hotel By The River is one of Hong Sang-soo's most mature and emotionally rich films, a black and white drama as intellectually rich as it is visually jaw-dropping - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2019
96% Birds of Passage (Pájaros de verano) (2019) Changing pace from Embrace of the Serpent, Guerra and Gallego have crafted a nuanced depiction of capitalism's corruptive DNA and a film that subverts all expectations - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2019
79% The Gospel of Eureka (2019) Brisk and propulsive, Mosher and Palmieri pace the film perfectly, getting across their point with economy and startling humanity. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 8, 2019
82% Daughter of Mine (Figlia mia) (2019) A brilliant follow up to Bispuri's ambitious debut, Daughter of Mine is an expertly crafted, richly told meditation on mother/daughter dynamics and what those roles truly mean - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2019
95% The Wild Pear Tree (Ahlat agaci) (2019) A devastatingly political work, this is a quietly told film about father/son dynamics that uses sudden bursts of surrealism to become something quietly revolutionary. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2019
71% Piercing (2019) It's impossible not to describe the film as expertly made, but there's little "there" there. Its examination of trauma and grief isn't entirely inspired and feels oddly empty. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2019
89% The Image Book (Le livre d'image) (2019) This is a dense film that has the structure of an essay picture, the tone of a dystopian thriller, the scope of a history book. Free association on mescaline. Brilliant. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2019
95% What Is Democracy? (2019) Taylor's film is an energetic one, styled as a typical issue picture, but willingness to open a dialogue that's refreshing and intellectually energizing. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2019
97% The Heiresses (Las Herederas) (2019) It's in its balancing of emotional artistry and nuanced political musing that makes The Heiresses a breath of fresh air. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2019
100% Shiraz (1928) Featuring a new score from beloved artist Anoushka Shanka, Shiraz is a grand epic that features production design and direction that's unlike anything from this time period. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2019
81% Buffalo Boys (2019) Opposite the film's clear-eyed and deeply angry ruminating on colonialism, the flatness of the narrative emotionally makes this a bizarrely off-kilter viewing experience. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 13, 2019
66% Vice (2018) It's not that the film is "dim," but it simply plays like a relic that's maybe a decade old, simply elevated by some above-average acting and a rarely better Amy Adams. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 28, 2018
92% Cold War (Zimna wojna) (2018) A film about a doomed romance, Cold War is a haunting portrait of love during wartime, a love that's maybe not meant to be but utterly, cosmically, inescapable. - The CriterionCast EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2018