Richard Brody Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Richard Brody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Thirst Street (2017) Burdge infuses her rigidly and scantly defined role with tremulous vulnerability, and Silver, aided by the splashy palette of Sean Price Williams's cinematography, evokes derangement with a sardonic wink.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
No Score Yet Hospital (1970) Reveals the decisive impact of the art and science of medicine-and the ways of government-on the lives of ordinary people.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
31% Sandy Wexler (2017) There's no way to recommend it, yet I wouldn't ask for my two hours back (though I do wish that they could have been sped up somewhat).‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017
88% The Lost City of Z (2017) With its bluff, romantic resuscitation of the cinema's classic adventure-tale genre and tone, it's perhaps Gray's most radical attempt at abstraction and displacement.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017
66% Free Fire (2017) A smug knockoff of Quentin Tarantino's brand of ironic violence, at several degenerations' remove.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017
78% Colossal (2017) At its best, it achieves a rare synthesis of virtues that is a primal value of the cinema: it revels in the power of cinematic artifice to tell a story that confronts big questions about real life.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
No Score Yet Welfare (1975) The psychology of poverty has rarely been so well depicted, along with the inadequacy of the bureaucracy itself: the ostensible objectivity of the law rests on the subjective judgments, even the good will, of the caseworkers.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
86% Norman (Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer) (2017) Cedar plays Norman's story for tragedy but never develops his inner identity, his history, or his ideals; the protagonist and his drama remain anecdotal and superficial.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
67% Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary (2017) A dully conventional film about a brilliantly unconventional musician.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
95% L'Avventura (1960) Rightly considered to be a cinematic landmark.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2017
92% Win It All (2017) Swanberg-aided greatly by Johnson's vigorous performance-makes the gambler's panic-stricken silence all the more agonizing, balancing the warm veneer of intimate normalcy with the inner chill of secrets and lies.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
100% The Seduction of Joe Tynan (1979) Schatzberg directs the film with a sleek yet relaxed precision that mirrors Joe's own breezy confidence.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
95% Prevenge (2017) If metaphors were movies, Alice Lowe's new film would be a masterwork. Instead, it's just smart fun-as well as a promising début.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
57% i hate myself :) (2017) Despite some memorably painful moments and underlying artistic urgency, the film's implications remain unprocessed and unquestioned.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
70% The Death of Louis XIV (La mort de Louis XIV) (2016) Serra's ideas are serious but simple, and his movie seems to illustrate them in slow motion.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
62% Carrie Pilby (2017) A core of substance and a fine cast are squandered in the relentless hard-sell perkiness of this mild comic drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
67% Life (2017) The movie reduces its fear factor to simple suspense that's not insignificant but is pretty insubstantial.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
96% The Mother and the Whore (La Maman et la putain) (1973) Eustache, in his tender and passionate depiction of their romantic roundelay, delivers nothing less than a comprehensive vision of France's post-1968 revolution-and it's a ferociously conservative view.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
No Score Yet La Naissance De L'amour (The Birth of Love) (2008) Against a media backdrop of the Gulf War and its human cost, Garrel, for all his intense personal sympathy for the artists' emotional turbulence, presents its price as well.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
94% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) Kore-eda looks sensitively at the deep roots of unquenched anguish, but he constructs the characters too neatly and the situations too precisely for the drama to seem like anything but a well-meaning lesson.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
45% Song to Song (2017) Malick ... displays a conspicuously painterly boldness, a sort of cinematic Impressionism that locates an indelible force of light and detail in the stuff of daily life.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
80% Personal Shopper (2017) The problem of Stewart's performance is indicative of Assayas's broader weaknesses as a director. In "Personal Shopper," his subject is intimacy and sensuality, but the film offers neither.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
No Score Yet Rat Film (2016) Anthony discovers a close correlation between the prevalence of a wide range of present-day afflictions and the predominantly black neighborhoods established a century ago-including, of course, the unrelieved prevalence of rats.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2017
61% Slack Bay (Ma loute) (2017) "Slack Bay" teems with the eventfulness of a serial compressed into a two-hour movie, and its sense of distillation emerges in the wide range of performance styles that Dumont elicits-and the physical precision that marks each of them.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2017
100% Strong Island (2017) Ford is more than a witness-he is a crucial participant in the events of the film, and its elements of pain and guilt are reflected in his grief-stricken, self-interrogating aesthetic.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2017
No Score Yet Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun? (2017) It's an essentially cinematic experience.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2017
90% Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One (1968) One of the greatest movies about moviemaking.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
73% Catfight (2017) The film's observations don't offer much depth or substance; the contemplation of destructive behavior in private mirroring destruction at an international level is sharp but hollow.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
66% Before I Fall (2017) There's little that the director, Ry Russo-Young, can do with the material's sentimental thinness, but she does something nonetheless ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
81% Actor Martinez (2017) Nathan Silver and Mike Ott's film is a spinning prism of fiction and nonfiction that tosses off iridescent glints of melancholy whimsy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
83% Frownland (2007) This amazingly accomplished first feature by Ronald Bronstein, made with a crew of four for seemingly little more than the cost of film stock, throbs with energy and vision.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 27, 2017
99% Get Out (2017) Peele's perfectly tuned cast and deft camera work unleash his uproarious humor along with his political fury; with his first film, he's already an American Buñuel.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2017
100% Daguerréotypes (1976) Observing traditional crafts and trades with loving fascination, Varda empathetically evokes their paradoxes-the depth of practical knowledge, the lack of variety in experience.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2017
41% A Cure For Wellness (2017) Verbinski inflates a story ready-made for a brisk Gothic shocker into a bloated, self-important mess.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2017
79% CSA: The Confederate States of America (2005) "C.S.A." tells a counter-story of how slavery survives to the present day-and it uses traces of contemporary pop culture to show that the notion isn't really even such a stretch.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
90% John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Despite the long takes and the wide angles, the traumatic violence looks like expertly realized C.G.I., combined with elaborately sampled stunt work.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2017
9% Fifty Shades Darker (2017) Foley's direction could serve as Exhibit A in the story of the demise of the mid-range drama: it didn't die a natural death but was killed off by the sort of reductive realism that's on display in "Fifty Shades Darker."‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
60% Paraguayan Hammock (2006) Encina's film, balanced exquisitely between the concrete and the abstract, between the specific and the absolute, is a quietly devastating indictment of the eternal waste of youth as cannon fodder in this and all wars.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
100% A New Leaf (1971) Reveals the essence of marital love more brutally than many confrontational melodramas.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
No Score Yet Man's Castle (1933) Filming the streetwise action and the colorful, caustic language from Jo Swerling's script, the director, Frank Borzage, finds sanctified tenderness in the poignant absurdities and grubby brutalities of gutter-level striving.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
100% Kanal (1961) The film turns combat-film clichés upside down.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
25% The Comedian (2017) The plot is forced and flimsy, the characters are thinly conceived, and the comic writing is often cringeworthy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
No Score Yet The Bowery (1933) The casual and constant violence, the drunkenness and gambling, the punished, unkempt bodies, and the mercurial swings between gutter and glory make Walsh's raw, raunchy film the authentic "Gangs of New York."‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
87% Warnung vor einer Heiligen Nutte (Beware of a Holy Whore) (1971) This is how the cinema looked, in 1971, to the twenty-six-year-old director Rainer Werner Fassbinder, who already had ten feature films under his belt.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
100% Columbus (2017) "Columbus" is one of the rare films in which nerdy intelligence-knowledge without experience-comes off without neurosis, comedic awkwardness, or vengeance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
77% Beach Rats (2017) "Beach Rats," a boldly irreconcilable drama, shows a character locating ugliness and horror within himself.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
67% Golden Exits (2017) "Golden Exits" is Brooklyn Bergman, a drama of death pushing from behind and despair looming ahead.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
75% Split (2017) The movie's simultaneous evocation of both the depravity at work beneath society's deceptive surfaces and the inadequacy of the liberal technocratic order to defend against that depravity is the secret to its success.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
100% Nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble (We Won't Grow Old Together) (1972) Pialat captures the push-and-pull of their impossible relationship with pugnacious images and abrupt editing.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
100% Ana-ta-han (Anatahan) (1954) Sternberg slashes the screen with Expressionist tangles of foliage and menacing shadows of rough-hewn latticework.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017