Richard Brody Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Richard Brody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
72% Last Days of Disco (1998) Stillman unfolds disco's vectors of power with a historian's insight and a novelist's eye for satirical nuance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 21, 2018
83% Deadpool 2 (2018) For all the impulsive flamboyance of Deadpool's patter, the liberating power of personal virtue, and the disinhibiting promise of second chances, "Deadpool 2" feels narrowly impersonal and oppressively unfree.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 18, 2018
No Score Yet A Dream is What You Wake Up From (1978) "A Dream Is What You Wake Up From" is a film of echoes and reverberations, of historical and societal phenomena reflected from generation to generation, both in the public realm and in private life.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 16, 2018
39% Life of the Party (2018) The pat drama and the mild conflicts of "Life of the Party" leave McCarthy with little chance to shine, despite her near-constant presence onscreen.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
88% Sollers Point (2018) Sketching Keith's inner conflicts and practical struggles with a graceful, mood-rich lyricism, Porterfield presses gently but painfully on some of the most inflamed and sensitive parts of American society.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet Fig Leaves (1926) Though the film is silent, Hawks's epigrammatic rapidity is already in evidence-the characters talk non-stop with such lively, pointed grace that viewers might swear they hear the intertitles spoken.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet The Pain of Others (2018) Lane, far from merely collecting, compiling, and sharing these videos, is, by the very framework of her observational editing, watching and experiencing them as if in real time, along with the viewer.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 11, 2018
No Score Yet August at Akiko's (2018) Yet another bold proof of the first-shot principle, the notion that many great films can be recognized as such from their opening images.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 11, 2018
94% Filmworker (2018) "Filmworker" amounts to yet another rite of devotion in the ongoing cult of Kubrick-a cult that worked its power not just on Vitali but on all of modern cinema.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 10, 2018
87% Tully (2018) Tully is a walking film script, and the best thing that can be said about the film is that a group of very talented actors works very hard to make its contrivances pass as plausible.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 7, 2018
50% Duck Butter (2018) The director, Miguel Arteta (who co-wrote the script with Shawkat), finds no symbolic dimension or wider resonance in the schematic proceedings.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 7, 2018
77% The Day After (Geu-hu) (2018) Hong tells the story in long and dialogue-filled takes, done in a soft black-and-white that feels like pencil drawings, to extract deep and earnest confessions with a graceful touch that shudders with the life-shaking emotions at their core.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 7, 2018
88% Let the Sunshine In (Un beau soleil intérieur) (2018) A simple story of enormous complexity. A romantic comedy and drama in which the questioning of those very categories is a part of the action...a peculiarly insightful glimpse into the emotional fluidity within the formal boundaries of French culture.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 2, 2018
76% The Moderns (1988) The movie's disparate elements are unified less by the plot than by Rudolph's distinctive, rhapsodic style, with its sinuous long takes and archly elusive performances.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2018
100% Infinite Football (2018) It's one of the most original and visionary documentary films to have emerged recently...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 29, 2018
83% Avengers: Infinity War (2018) The insubstantiality of the film isn't due to the infinite yet flimsy malleability of C.G.I. gimmickry but, instead, to the dispersion of its drama throughout the many cinematic installations set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 29, 2018
No Score Yet Qui trop embrasse... (1986) It's a pathbreaking film-one that expands, even at three decades' remove, the possibilities of naturalistic drama in ways that very few filmmakers have attempted.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 25, 2018
33% I Feel Pretty (2018) I Feel Pretty is the second movie comedy within the last year in which Schumer's inventive artistry is misused.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2018
45% Mrs. Hyde (Madame Hyde) (2018) As in Stevenson's story, the unleashing of Marie's latent furies inevitably veers toward horror, infusing Bozon's sociological satire with bitter ironies about the forces of order and the uses of disorder.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 23, 2018
55% Godard Mon Amour (Le redoutable) (2018) Hazanavicius skips over the detailed observations and nuanced insights of Wiazemsky's book in favor of parodies of Godard's earlier work, replacing its vast substance, fierce originality, and unsparing intimacy with empty stylistic winks.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 16, 2018
97% The Rider (2018) Zhao seems to have filmed with her head down, focussed on her screenplay, rather than up, focussed on the richness of what was taking place around her.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 15, 2018
84% Borg Vs. McEnroe (2018) "Borg vs. McEnroe" is an anecdotally gratifying, psychologically nuanced, and dramatically agile character study of Borg, but, despite its extended depictions of a celebrated match, it's not a satisfying tennis movie at all.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 15, 2018
80% Where Is Kyra? (2018) The script, by Darci Picoult, does little to illuminate thoughts, plans, and lives; the banal dialogue is delivered at a slow and pause-riddled pace, as if to infuse it with meaning and emotion that it doesn't contain.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 9, 2018
72% Jeannette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc (Jeannette l'enfance de Jeanne d'Arc) (2018) Dumont films Joan's spiritual conflicts and confrontations with playful exuberance but avoids frivolity; the ardent actors infuse Joan's spirit of revolt with the eternal passions of youth.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 9, 2018
79% Chappaquiddick (2018) The sketches of Kennedy-family tensions and loyalties are thin and simplistic; the action rushes by with little insight or context.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 9, 2018
94% Zama (2018) Martel creates a cinema of dialectical tensions; the bustling activity of offices and drawing rooms veers outside the frame while voices of authority and complaint assail the hero with a bewildering tangle of conflicting demands and desires.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 9, 2018
No Score Yet Chikamatsu monogatari (The Crucified Lovers) (1954) Condenses a wide array of injustices-as well as an extraordinary romantic power-into its brisk and wide-ranging action.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 2, 2018
83% Blockers (2018) The absurdity of the parents' intervention gets symbolic weight from the deftly destructive physical comedy that they have to endure.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 2, 2018
79% Unsane (2018) Above all, he revels, with palpable joy, in his repertory of distorted, disturbing, lurid yet lucid images, making a furious movie that signifies nothing but the irrepressible vitality of the cinema itself. Soderbergh's experiment is a success.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
74% Roxanne Roxanne (2018) Larnell gathers a wide cast of vital actors for a bustling series of incidents that veer quickly from the sentimental to the shattering.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 26, 2018
100% Personal Problems (2018) The movie's panoramic cityscapes teem with the gritty details of emotional life: romance and chores, hope and despair and loss, bitter resentments and rowdy reckonings with mortality.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 26, 2018
No Score Yet Le Bonheur (1966) Varda fills her frames with riots of nature and color, like Bonnard paintings come to life, and with an erotic intimacy to match, choreographing physical passion with unabashed but formally controlled delight.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 26, 2018
62% Ismael's Ghosts (Les fantômes d'Ismaël) (2018) Desplechin mines his earlier films and his cultural obsessions for a formidable trove of narrative complications, which he flings into the script with admirable abandon but without directorial audacity to match.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 26, 2018
82% Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948) This lightly sweetened tale is still remarkably meaty.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2018
95% 12 Days (12 Jours) (2018) The movie leaps past practical politics into ultimate philosophical realms.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2018
No Score Yet Before Summer Ends (Avant la fin de l'été) (2017) Goormaghtigh reinvigorates the summertime road-trip genre with this lyrical, keenly observed, acutely political comedy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 12, 2018
39% A Wrinkle in Time (2018) Ava DuVernay's film adaptation of it catches the sense of exhilaration and wonder that arises from the story's elements of fantasy. ‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 7, 2018
45% 90th Academy Awards (2018) The jokes were funny, but, for the most part, the events of the evening were extraordinarily tame. The industry seems, above all, to be protecting itself-shielding itself from any sense that its corruption is built into the system.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2018
No Score Yet Perimenontas tous varvarous (Waiting for the Barbarians) (2014) Green unites his multifaceted artistry-featuring dramatic production, historical investigation, and sharply rarefied images-in a concise, philosophical, and comedic tour de force.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2018
42% Skidoo (1968) The scattershot and hectic comedy conveys Preminger's sense that the world he knows is coming apart at the seams; he does more than depict or caricature the cultural shifts and the generational clashes of the times-he finds new cinematic forms for them.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2018
83% The Panic in Needle Park (1971) Schatzberg doesn't romanticize addicts' troubles; with a tender but unsparing eye, he spins visual variations on shambling degradation and transient relief.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2018
82% Game Night (2018) The movie is a hollow throwback to classic comedy, and it shines only by contrast with dull studio competition.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2018
88% Claire's Camera (La caméra de Claire) (2018) Hong distills vast emotional crises and creative self-recognitions into confessional monologues, pugnacious discussions, and luminous aphorisms.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2018
87% Annihilation (2018) In this numbingly ludicrous science-fiction drama, written and directed by Alex Garland, a talented cast of actors play undeveloped characters delivering leaden dialogue in a haphazard story that's filmed with a bland slickness.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2018
89% Werewolf (2018) Working with the cinematographer Scott Moore, McKenzie frames her characters with a radical obliqueness, visually conveying their wounded tenderness and stifled fury and evoking mortal struggles with minuscule gestures.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2018
57% The Young Karl Marx (Le jeune Karl Marx) (2018) The movie's plush, cozy aesthetic and unintentionally funny melodrama are at odds with its subjects: revolt, theory, originality, and observation.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2018
92% The Silence (1963) Bergman unfolds grand themes-childhood and its mute sensibility, adulthood and its unhealed emotional wounds-in highly inflected images, which have an anguished intensity unseen since the age of silent films.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2018
13% Fifty Shades Freed (2018) The impersonally crafted, emptily realized, expensively produced movie gets its modicum of humanity from Dakota Johnson, who has the gift of simply seeming alive and present when she's on camera.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
14% Winchester (2018) In "Winchester," the Spierigs have made a blunt and pissy American political film about the national curse of firearms and the unslaked, violent, destructive anger of the defeated Confederacy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2018
No Score Yet Half-Cocked (1995) Though the aesthetic is rough-and-ready, Hawley is a sincere and sensitive storyteller who brings the characters to life with subtle, oblique touches that show who they are without saying too much about them.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2018