Richard Brody Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Richard Brody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
93% Boxing Gym (2010) Wiseman captures these staccato polyrhythms both visually and sonically. There's not a lot of hitting here; he clearly delights in the sport's balletic beauty.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2017
No Score Yet Lumiere (1976) It's no bravura showcase, no feast of technique or display of virtuosity; it's a calm, lyrical melodrama with an air of lightness and grace, a survivor's story.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
No Score Yet Yeast (2008) Bronstein's exhilarating meditation on performance and identity advances to a resolution that is as surprising as it is transcendent.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
75% Patti Cake$ (2017) Jasper hits every note of sentimental manipulation in a tale that's as fleetingly affecting as it is insubstantial and mechanical.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
14% Planetarium (2017) For all of its virtues and distinctions, Planetarium isn't a comprehensive experience; it's a teeming and gleeful grab bag of deft cinematic flourishes.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2017
83% Detroit (2017) Bigelow doesn't have as original, as distinctive, as reflective a sense of cinematic drama as the extraordinary subject matter of "Detroit" requires.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2017
93% Dunkirk (2017) Nolan's sense of memory and of history is as flattened-out and untroubled as his sense of psychology and of character.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2017
86% Ingrid Goes West (2017) Aubrey Plaza's fiercely committed performance nearly rescues this dubious contrivance from absurdity.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2017
100% Red Desert (1964) Michelangelo Antonioni's first film in color, from 1964, is his most mysterious and awe-inspiring work.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2017
73% Landline (2017) The actors fling themselves with forced charm into their narrowly defined roles, and Robespierre juggles the story lines with a bland vigor that lacks any observational, analytical, or symbolic dimension.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2017
78% Brigsby Bear (2017) Spunky yet maudlin, grim yet heartwarming, the movie ... is mainly a batch of hollow gestures.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2017
No Score Yet The Blot (1921) Weber films this pain-seared drama with a meticulous eye for the telling detail-worn-out shoes, torn carpet, tatty furniture-and for the nuances of social observation and concealments on which pride and shame depend.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2017
75% Atomic Blonde (2017) Theron keeps her cool throughout the pummelling gyrations, but the film strains to achieve a breathless panache and a lurid swagger for which David Leitch's direction is too heavy-footed and literal ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2017
92% Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) A strangely oblivious film, one that undercuts its story with exactly the sort of praise-hungriness that its hero learns to overcome.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2017
51% Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (2017) The overwhelming quantity of effects offers little style or surprise; the movie is a joyless, effortful slog.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2017
98% The Big Sick (2017) "The Big Sick" suffers from an excess of pleasantness, and this very pleasantness thins out its substance, blands out its tone, weakens its comedy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
45% It's Only the End of the World (Juste la fin du monde) (2016) A stellar cast of French actors is mainly left to run lines and hyperventilate in Xavier Dolan's turgid yet occasionally affecting melodrama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
79% The Beguiled (2017) "The Beguiled," in its quasi-mathematical abstraction, amounts to little more than the baseline proof of [Coppola's] method-a reductio ad absurdum.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
76% The Little Hours (2017) The good-natured comedy has only occasional outbursts of wildness; the cheerfully playful ribaldry of the writing and the performances can't quite overcome the mere efficiency of the filmmaking.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
100% The Hole (Le Trou) (1964) Becker details the ambient violence of prison life, the hidden negotiations between captives and captors, and the solidarity of detainees, but his deeply empathetic, fanatically specific view of his protagonists leaves out some elements.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
96% The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman's Portrait Photography (2017) The depth of her art reflects a life richly lived, as does the wisdom of her epigrammatic musings.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
93% The Beguiled (1971) The story may sometimes come off as a ribald soldiers' tale that Siegel ... had been awaiting a sexual revolution to tell; still, his intense, intelligent breakdown of the film's wild outbursts reveals subtleties of love, despair, and shame ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
15% Transformers: The Last Knight (2017) All the best moments in the movie-pure images, devoid of symbol and, for that matter, nearly empty of sense-go by too fast, are held too briefly, are developed too little.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
91% Mauvais Sang (2013) A masterpiece of ecstatic cinema from 1986, directed by Leos Carax at the age of twenty-five.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
44% The Bad Batch (2017) Amirpour ... delivers this imaginative tale as a simplistic allegory of the haves and the have-nots; she ruefully delights in the wasteland's postindustrial wreckage while leaving characters' thoughts and motives blank.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
No Score Yet Angel (1937) Lubitsch sees the round of coincidences as a game of cruel destiny, albeit one that's played on the world stage against a backdrop of looming war.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
100% Dawson City: Frozen Time (2017) In "Dawson City," Morrison offers a fiercely precise and discerning look at movies themselves as embodiments of history.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
92% Wonder Woman (2017) "Wonder Woman" is a superhero movie, and it fulfills the heroic and mythic demands of that genre, but it's also an entry in the genre of wisdom literature that shares hard-won insights and long-pondered paradoxes of the past with a sincere intimacy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
88% Monkey Business (1952) A summit of comic invention.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
54% War Machine (2017) The absolute absence of intimacy, of psychology, of characters' self-revelation in thought and desire, is a failure of form and style as much as of content.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2017
88% It Comes At Night (2017) This modest science-fiction thriller brings the hands-on vigor of independent filmmaking to a high-concept premise, but the results are insubstantial and impersonal.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2017
No Score Yet Johanna D'Arc of Mongolia (Joan of Arc of Mongolia) (1989) For all its outwardly probing observation and decorative delights, the movie concludes with an abstract touch that's as breathtaking as any of its sights and sounds.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
71% Alien: Covenant (2017) In space, no one can hear you laugh.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
67% Lions Love (1969) More than a time capsule of events and moods-it's a living aesthetic model for revolutionary times.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
82% The Woman Who Left (Ang babaeng humayo) (2017) The pace is an anti-ornamental affectation that artificially distends an hour's worth of action.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
85% Hermia & Helena (2017) Piñeiro conjures a cogently realistic yet gloriously imaginative vision of youthful ardor in love and art alike.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
62% An Affair to Remember (1957) McCarey plays the shipboard courtship for generous and tender laughs-the wryly staged first kiss is one of the sweetest in all cinema-but the comedy that follows on dry land is mostly inadvertent.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
90% Icaros: A Vision (2017) The hallucinatory power of ayahuasca and the incantatory lure of rituals fuse with existential dread in this darkly hypnotic drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 15, 2017
No Score Yet Bless Their Little Hearts (2008) Woodberry crafts a passionately pensive realism-nearly every scene of action is matched by a long one in which one character or another, in observant repose, looks back and sees their self reflected in society's mirror.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 15, 2017
35% Snatched (2017) Schumer and Hawn go dutifully through the film's paces, animating the movie with their mere presence while the best elements of their art stay in the closet for next time.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 12, 2017
86% The Lovers (2017) The movie exhausts itself in its conception and sits inert on the screen like an undigested mass of script pages.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
75% A Woman's Life (Une vie) (2017) Brizé pays more attention to the tasteful costumes and the alluring settings than to the drama or the images.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
95% Léon Morin, Prêtre (Leon Morin, Priest) (The Forgiven Sinner) (1961) Melville films the religious dialectics with remarkable but dispassionate skill, and he uses the story of Barny and Morin to skew the postwar political context ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
71% Taboo (2000) A spare and cruel drama about sex and violence within the ranks of the samurai.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
88% Close-up (Nema-ye Nazdik) (1999) In Kiarostami's furiously clear view, religious dogma suppresses the eye's observations through the dictate of the word; his calmly unwavering images, with their wry humor and generous sympathy, have the force of a steadfast resistance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
No Score Yet Bush Mama (1979) Gerima's great achievement is to compose a cinematic style that's simultaneously observational and subjective, dramatic and internalized.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 1, 2017
82% Casting JonBenét (2017) "Casting JonBenet," is in many ways a deeply unsatisfying, even infuriating film, but I wouldn't want not to have seen it.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 1, 2017
67% Thirst Street (2017) Burdge infuses her rigidly and scantly defined role with tremulous vulnerability, and Silver, aided by the splashy palette of Sean Price Williams's cinematography, evokes derangement with a sardonic wink.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
No Score Yet Hospital (1970) Reveals the decisive impact of the art and science of medicine-and the ways of government-on the lives of ordinary people.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
28% Sandy Wexler (2017) There's no way to recommend it, yet I wouldn't ask for my two hours back (though I do wish that they could have been sped up somewhat).‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017