Richard Brody Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Richard Brody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
11% Fifty Shades Freed (2018) The impersonally crafted, emptily realized, expensively produced movie gets its modicum of humanity from Dakota Johnson, who has the gift of simply seeming alive and present when she's on camera.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
11% Winchester (2018) In "Winchester," the Spierigs have made a blunt and pissy American political film about the national curse of firearms and the unslaked, violent, destructive anger of the defeated Confederacy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2018
No Score Yet Half-Cocked (1995) Though the aesthetic is rough-and-ready, Hawley is a sincere and sensitive storyteller who brings the characters to life with subtle, oblique touches that show who they are without saying too much about them.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2018
93% 24 Frames (2018) Above all, the movie offers the mournful thrill of new methods that Kiarostami didn't live to develop further.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2018
100% Shirkers (2018) An exemplary work of counter-lives and alternative histories, intimate self-portraiture and cultural reconstruction, hard-won empathy and painful reconciliation.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2018
100% Bisbee '17 (2017) In "Bisbee '17," Greene peels the layers of oblivion off history like so many layers of paint.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2018
89% Madeline's Madeline (2018) A drama of furious disconnection, a cinematic gear-grinding of a working-class family of modest means who seem hardly at home in their own neighborhood and are relentlessly abraded by contact with the deceptively welcoming milieu of art.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2018
No Score Yet The Chair (1963) Offers high drama, complex characters, and vivid performances that match those of any fictional film.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2018
No Score Yet Soleil O (1970) Hondo's passionate, wide-ranging voice-over commentary, addressing the hero in the second person, blends confession and observation, aspiration and despair, societal and personal conflicts.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2018
No Score Yet Outrage (1950) [A] profoundly insightful and far-reaching drama ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2018
100% Paddington 2 (2018) [Paddington 2] has one out-loud laugh, plenty of sincere cleverness, vast technical ingenuity, a warm heart, lively performances and enough gyroscopic camera moves to make Max Ophüls jealous.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2018
100% Tall: The American Skyscraper and Louis Sullivan (2006) A few insistent sound effects and music cues don't detract from the film's vital conception; its images embody both the potent hidden legacies of civic life and Kirchheimer's own progressive idealism.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2018
100% The Queen (1968) Whether pushing the camera close to the performers or zooming in from afar to survey them intimately, Simon captures the lavish life of theatrical imagination that inspires them and makes gender itself seem like an urgent performance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2018
No Score Yet Pow Wow (2016) American history bursts forth in the present tense in Robinson Devor's probingly associative documentary, composed of his encounters with residents of California's Coachella Valley.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2018
58% The Commuter (2018) The set pieces and the cliché dialogue seem piled on randomly ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2018
96% The Wind Will Carry Us (2014) Kiarostami films the encounters and the landscapes with a patient, painterly tenderness, but his modest methods conceal vast political goals.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2018
71% Wuyong (Useless) (2007) Zhangke eludes the genre's constraints to provide a revelatory documentary view of inner and outer life in contemporary China.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2018
62% My Art (2018) The result is a frankly practical look at professionalism and its blurry borders.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2018
82% Lover For A Day (L'amant d'un jour) (2018) Garrel's venerable mode of personal filmmaking exalts intimate life as fragmented melodrama, but his latest film plays more like an unintentional self-parody.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2018
80% Naked Childhood (L'Enfance nue) (1969) The film plays like the work of a bitterly angry man, and, indeed, the set was a battleground for cast and crew. The resulting four-hour yawp of fury was cut down to this eighty-three-minute glint of menace.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2018
No Score Yet Hard, Fast and Beautiful (1951) The drama spotlights the price that love, in a time of unquestioned inequities, exacts.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 1, 2018
82% Molly's Game (2018) The quality of the screenplay takes a back seat to its quantity, and the direction never brings it to life.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2017
73% Hostiles (2018) The bare script seems written by telegram, reducing the characters to pieces on a historical chessboard, and the portentous pace and lugubrious tone of Cooper's direction take the place of substance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2017
55% The Greatest Showman (2017) The director, Michael Gracey, delivers quick doses of excitement in splashy scenes but has little feel for the choreographic action, offers scant historical substance, and displays slender dramatic insight.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2017
77% All the Money in the World (2017) The cast seems over all unguided, left to their own devices, as if each were acting alone in a booth, and the drama is similarly detached and hermetic.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2017
91% Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) The movie comes off as a work that's ironed out, flattened down, appallingly purified.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
92% The Rape Of Recy Taylor (2017) Essential viewing, not least for its emphasis on the crucial role of women in the civil-rights movement ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2017
93% Bigger Than Life (1956) Mason's gift for cold-eyed madness is heightened by Ray's exuberantly lurid approach.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2017
91% Story of a Love Affair (Cronaca di un amore) (1950) Antonioni captures their passion with architectural precision; he presses his lovers into hard-edged corporate and domestic spaces by way of graphically etched, high-contrast camerawork ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2017
90% I, Tonya (2018) Gillespie's empathy is mixed with condescension; much of the movie's bluff comedy mocks the tone and the actions of Tonya and her milieu.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2017
91% The Disaster Artist (2017) The comedy, for all its scenes of giddy wonder, never gets past Tommy's mask of mystery; avoiding speculation and investigation, it stays on the surface of his public and private shtick, leaving little more than a trail of amusing anecdotes.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2017
90% The Other Side of Hope (Toivon tuolla puolen) (2017) Running gags about oddball twists in the restaurant business serve little purpose but don't detract from the movie's essential quasi-documentary power.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
No Score Yet Dusty and Sweets McGee (1971) Mutrux captures with a sharp, furtive eye the crevices of public life that the drug trade fills ... and scenes of Mephistophelian kingpins show that the moral rot of drugs runs through all levels of society.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
50% Porto (2017) [A] quietly bombastic and emotionally oblivious romantic drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
38% I Love You, Daddy (2017) Louis C.K. doesn't approach his subject substantially; rather, he uses China's coming-of-age story as a wedge to endorse, with an obliviously unconditional smugness, the merits of relationships between older men and teen-age girls.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
100% The Cool World (1964) Clarke's images endow the characters' energies with a sculptural grandeur and embrace street life with a keenly attentive, unsentimental avidity.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
No Score Yet Illusions (1982) Dash blends intimate portraiture with echoing reflections and multiple exposures that capture Hollywood's harrowing game of multiple and hidden identities.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
94% On the Beach at Night Alone (Bamui haebyun-eoseo honja) (2017) There's a dark romanticism powering Hong Sang-soo's furious, tautly controlled, yet coolly comedic drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
96% Mudbound (2017) Rees uses voice-overs to bring the many characters to life, but the text is thin; the movie's exposition is needlessly slow and stepwise, and the drama, though affecting, is literal and oversimplified.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
88% Wait for Your Laugh (2017) [Jason] Wise's film is more than a tribute to her-it's a new setting within which, telling the story of her life, she performs again.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2017
80% Regular Lovers (2005) Garrel gives an original artistic form to his rueful view of his own youthful illusions.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
54% LBJ (2017) The political intricacies and hearty bluster of Rob Reiner's drama, about Lyndon Baines Johnson's accidental Presidency, help to overcome its wax-museum eeriness.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
99% Lady Bird (2017) As writer and director, Greta Gerwig infuses this comedic coming-of-age drama with verbal virtuosity, gestural idiosyncrasy, and emotional vitality.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
43% Don't Come Knocking (2006) Despite the film's false notes, its balladlike moods ring true.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
88% Only the Brave (2017) Though the movie, based on an article in GQ, by Sean Flynn, offers fascinating insights into the practical exertions and bureaucratic complications of firefighting, it places much greater emphasis on the protagonists' personal lives.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
87% Novitiate (2017) Betts ... undercuts the characters' passion and transcendent devotion with audiovisual commonplaces, familiar acting styles, and a merely anecdotal narrative.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
91% Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold (2017) The result, though loving and celebratory, is closer to an official portrait than an illuminating biography.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
97% Félicité (2017) The movie is a virtual documentary of city sights and moods, and also a bitter exposé of a country without a social safety net.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
85% Sylvio (2017) Bernardi is an actor of genius; his Janus-faced pantomime, as Sylvio struggles voicelessly for a place among human chatterboxes, channels the infinite grace of the great silent-film comedians.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2017
87% Professor Marston & The Wonder Women (2017) The writer and director Angela Robinson illuminates an extraordinary corner of pop-culture history with a bland and textureless drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2017