Vincent Canby

Vincent Canby
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
(Photo Credit: Bettmann/ Contributor/ Bettmann /Getty Images)
Publications: New York Times

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
50% Crimewave (1986) It's of principal interest as an example of the kind of film likely to be made by young people who, though they have talent and enthusiasm, haven't yet any distinctively personal point of view. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2020
80% Two Gentlemen Sharing (1969) Ted Kotcheff... directed in a fashion that seems designed to underscore the obvious. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020
33% Hitler: The Last Ten Days (1973) It is curious, then, that a fairly serious-minded film should be so superfluous. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
98% Paris Is Burning (1991) There is a lot of common sense and natural wit behind the role-playing. Yet there is also a terrible sadness in the testimony. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
93% Chan Is Missing (1982) It's a matchless delight. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
24% The River (1984) [The River] has a meticulously detailed physical production and, from time to time, is acted with passion by its cast. Yet its ideas are so profoundly muddled that the film must run mainly on sentimentality. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2020
57% Yanks (1979) It's soft, sort of spongy and so bland that you may well remember the scenery better than anything that happens in front of it. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 16, 2020
100% The Whole Shootin' Match (1979) A loving, indulgent, funny, very casual movie about the ups and downs of a couple of innocent, self-defeating American clowns. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 2, 2020
64% Villain (1971) In its payroll heists, its car chases, its beatings and in its final confrontation, the movie employs gestures that in other, better films, such as "Get Carter," seemed classic, but here are only second-hand. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 26, 2020
57% A Love in Germany (Eine Liebe in Deutschland) (1983) [Schygulla] gives what must be called a triumphant performance, one that ranks with the best of her work with Fassbinder, in a film that must be the most romantic ever made by Mr. Wajda. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2020
100% Blue Water, White Death (1971) The heart of the film is its action, recorded with immense technical skill, and it is so pure that it's as poetic as anything I've seen on the screen in a long, long time. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2020
67% King Lear (1971) King Lear Is, I think, Brook at his manic best. It triumphantly ignores both romantic and naturalistic traditions to achieve something akin to the so-called new theater in film terms. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2020
50% Malizia (1973) Malizia is at its best when it's examining the rituals of middle-class Sicilian life (a funeral where everything goes wrong and the corpse is almost burned up) and when it is leering at its sexually driven characters. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2020
17% The Beast in the Cellar (1971) The ladies spend most of their time in the parlor, drinking tea and talking the plot over and out. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2020
40% Beyond the Law (1967) The encounters are so vivid and violent and -- occasionally -- moving that unless you're member of the Mailer Mob, which I'm not, it's impossible to tell the "real" actors from the "false." - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2020
50% Joe Hill (1971) The movie is so irresolute in making assumption about its hero, about his drives and his dreams, and especially about his guilt, that it is scarcely an appreciation of even the mythical Joe Hill. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2020
79% The Innocent (L'innocente) (1979) Visconti's last film (completed in 1976 shortly before his death) and among the most beautiful and severely disciplined films he has ever made. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2020
83% Favourites of the Moon (Les Favoris de la lune) (1984) You can laugh with it, if you're willing to believe that the film makers are as witty as they keep announcing without demonstrating, or you can be awestruck by the amount of care, money and talent that appear to have been spent for so little effect. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2020
74% The Fog (1980) Unlike Halloween, which was a model of straight-forward terror and carefully controlled suspense, The Fog is constructed of random diversions. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2020
No Score Yet Bunny O'Hare (1971) Bunny O'Hare is nonsense of a quite acceptable order, filled with absurd chases and stock characters who have been conceived and played with affection. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
14% The Next Man (1976) There have been more expensive films this year, and more foolish ones, but The Next Man must be the most foolish film of such expense. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2019
No Score Yet The Magic Garden of Stanley Sweetheart (1970) Its camera swings and there is a lot of rock music on the soundtrack. However, like so many other places of expensive, modish, retail merchandise, it remains calculatingly bland. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2019
No Score Yet Elisa, My Love (Elisa, vida mia) (1983) The main reasons to see the film are the two leading performances. Mr. Rey is always an interesting presence, and Miss Chaplin, as in all of her Saura films, reveals qualities of feeling, control and beauty that no other directors have ever found. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
91% The Story of Adele H (1975) [The Story of Adele H.] looks and sounds like no other Truffaut film you've ever seen. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 23, 2019
100% The Buddy Holly Story (1978) It's Gary Busey's galvanizing solo performance that gives meaning to an otherwise shapeless and bland feature-length film about the American rock-and-roll star who was killed in a plane crash in 1959. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 23, 2019
40% A Time for Dying (1969) It's to Mr. Boetticher's credit that, in spite of these large failings, A Time for Dying is a fascinating film, a fit subject for further research. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 13, 2019
64% The Bed Sitting Room (1969) Apocalyptic or prophetic cinema, whether it is in the form of science fiction or farce, demands more than picturesque sets and costumes and a decent, concerned sensibility. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 8, 2019
No Score Yet Year of the Woman (1973) Miss Hochman, who apparently considers herself a force for raising women's consciousnesses, sees hardly anyone except herself in this montage of interviews and dopey fantasy sequences. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 4, 2019
59% The Music Lovers (1971) Although Tchaikovsky died of cholera, for which a hot bath was prescribed, the implication of "The Music Lovers" is that he was simply boiled to death, which is what the movie does to his genius. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 14, 2019
83% The Bostonians (1984) ''The Bostonians'' is, from its opening shot to last, a rare delight, a high comedy with tragic undertones, acted to passionate perfection by a cast of the best actors ever assembled by the Merchant-Ivory-Jhabvala team. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 6, 2018
No Score Yet The Crazy-Quilt (1966) The Crazy Quilt" was photographed in and around San Francisco, which serves to root its fairly cosmic theme in very specific reality. So do the performances of Tom Rosqui as Henry and Iña Mela as Lorabelle. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2018
50% A Distant Trumpet (1964) It takes a heap of loafing to make a Western film so dull you even lose interest in watching the horses and the stunt men doing their stuff. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2018
63% The Way We Were (1973) By, some peculiar alchemy, "The Way We Were" turns into the kind of compromised claptrap that Hubbell is supposed to be making within the film and that we're meant to think is a sellout. It is. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2018
17% Making It (1971) Like the movie itself, [Tabori's] performance is composed of details, all of which are accurate enough but which are never fitted together to make an especially meaningful experience. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2018
No Score Yet Something Big (1971) Difficult to dislike even though it's not really very good. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2018
57% Malice (1993) No matter how wild the plot reversals, there's always a slightly madder one to come. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2018
No Score Yet T.R. Baskin (1971) T. R. Baskin is never at a loss for words, most of which sound as if they had come straight from the notebook of a writer who spent most of time jotting down funny lines without ever worrying much about character. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2018
59% Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972) "Dr. Phibes Rises Again" makes the usually dumb mistake of aspiring to be camp. Mysteriously, a lot of it works, probably because Robert Fuest, the director, knows just how long to hold an effect before it wilts. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2018
25% Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (1979) Is to movie-going what corn flakes are to eating. Just to anticipate it is to know everything about it. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
80% The Adventures of Mark Twain (1985) Everything looks soft, squashy and sort of ugly. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
91% Homicide (1991) The movie cannot learn from its mistakes; they are forever displayed within it. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 13, 2017
56% Le Casanova de Fellini (1976) The production is gigantic, but the ideas and feelings are small. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2017
100% Talking to Strangers (1988) A nearly perfect antidote to today's jazzy conception of montage, seemingly designed for short attention spans, is Rob Tregenza's stylistic tour de force titled Talking to Strangers. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
50% Tracks (1976) The movie has the stoned, improvised look of an artifact out of the 1960's, having less to do with considered opposition to the war than with a vague sort of dissatisfaction with everything, and no idea what to do about it. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2017
83% My Little Loves (Mes Petites Amoureuses) (1974) It's less like a piece of finished fiction than a series of terse, precisely worded entries in a notebook. This is both the style of the film and its charm. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 8, 2016
No Score Yet The Inland Sea (1992) The real Japan remains elusive but, in the course of this fascinating and deceptively serene journey, Mr. Richie discovers reflections of himself in the people he meets and in his own reactions to them. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2016
71% For Your Eyes Only (1981) Most of the time, though, For Your Eyes Only is a slick entertainment. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2015
83% Chinese Roulette (1976) Taking one step at a time, Mr. Fassbinder is exploring new methods of cinema narrative that are more original and daring than anything I've yet to see by film makers who call themselves avant-garde. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2015
No Score Yet Inchon (1981) Inchon is a hysterical historical epic, somewhat less offensive than The Green Berets and far funnier. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2015
No Score Yet From Hollywood to Hanoi (1995) An intense, personal, supremely self-confident feature-length documentary. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 4, 2015