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      Markie Robson-Scott

      Markie Robson-Scott

      Markie Robson-Scott's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Arts Desk
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      Movies reviews only

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      Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
      2/5
      Surprised by Oxford (2022) This vaguely religious, Jesus-lite rom com, co-written by Weber, feels wishy-washy -- though its cast, which includes Simon Callow, Mark Williams and Michael Culkin, lends it pizzazz. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Sep 27, 2023
      3/5
      Everybody Loves Jeanne (2022) [A] charming, funny debut feature. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2023
      4/5
      The Damned Don't Cry (2022) It’s beautifully paced, outstandingly fresh and original. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jul 11, 2023
      4/5
      War Pony (2022) It’s an extraordinary film: bleak, gritty, tragic, sometimes funny, and a seemingly unlikely directorial debut from actress Riley Keough and Gina Gammell. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2023
      4/5
      Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret. (2023) Writer-director Kelly Fremon Craig's charming, atmospheric movie is mainly faithful to Judy Blume's iconic novel, fans will be relieved to know, though transferring such an interior life on to the screen is by definition problematic. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted May 18, 2023
      4/5
      One Fine Morning (2022) The action plays out over a year, with Hanson-Løve and cinematographer Denis Lenoir creating a marvellously real world that’s never static or forced. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2023
      3/5
      Other People's Children (2022) It is an attractive, quintessentially French film, set in Paris and beautifully shot by Georges Lechaptois, but rather cloying and well mannered. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2023
      4/5
      Nostalgia (2022) You can see the end coming a mile off, but the film’s sensuous quality and Favino’s terrific performance rescue it from predictability. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Feb 22, 2023
      4/5
      Women Talking (2022) Moving, vibrant, and compelling. At first glance, it might seem an unpromisingly static set-up, in danger of speechifying, but Polley’s direction manages to avoid these pitfalls. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2023
      3/5
      The Whale (2022) The Whale, with its themes of redemption, family love and the boundless human capacity for caring about other people -- all fine in themselves but too melodramatic, too portentous here -- doesn’t tell us much about the psychology of obesity. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Feb 03, 2023
      3/5
      Enys Men (2022) It’s never a good sign if you have to scour a director’s statement for clues, but Enys Men is not easy to interpret, or, for that matter, to enjoy. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2023
      4/5
      Corsage (2022) This exhilarating, beautiful, inventive film, with its great depth of colour and luminous cinematography by Judith Kaufmann, shows us a woman determined to live, or die, on her own terms. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jan 03, 2023
      3/5
      Charlotte (2021) It can’t fail to be moving and deeply painful, though the rather conventional, pastel-hued, 2D animation is somewhat at odds with Salomon’s vibrant Expressionistic style and the terrible events themselves - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Dec 13, 2022
      3/5
      The Silent Twins (2022) The film makes it too fantastical to believe in, which is a shame, as it’s all based on fact. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2022
      3/5
      The Menu (2022) The dialogue is disappointing, the plotting inconsistent and it’s hard to care about any of the characters. If you want culinary drama, Boiling Point and The Bear are far more interesting. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Nov 18, 2022
      3/5
      Hilma (2022) A 2019 documentary, Beyond the Visible, is worth watching first, though Hilma does raise interesting questions about the nature of creativity. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Oct 28, 2022
      3/5
      Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris (2022) Mrs Harris Goes to Paris, based on Paul Gallico’s 1958 novel, is preposterous. But it’s as pretty as a pink cloud. The director, Anthony Fabian, knows that in these grim times, escapism is good box office. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Oct 03, 2022
      3/5
      See How They Run (2022) An ingenious premise and a bit of fun, but not quite sharp enough. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Sep 09, 2022
      3/5
      My Old School (2022) In spite of some flabbiness to the structure, there’s something very warm and funny about these ex-pupils with their memories of school and its electric adolescent mix of tedium, fear and excitement. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2022
      4/5
      Nitram (2021) Beautifully shot by Germain McMicking, Nitram poses questions, offers no answers and stays in the mind for a very long time. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jul 01, 2022
      3/5
      Swan Song (2021) In Swan Song, [Udo Kier] carries off his first starring role magnificently as wry ex-drag queen and Ohio hairdresser Pat Pitsenbarger, though the film itself is rather meandering and has mawkish, saccharine moments. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2022
      4/5
      Bergman Island (2021) Nordic seriousness is absent: this is, in many ways, a light-hearted movie, with the unusual mix of Lee Hazlewood, ABBA, and finally Tina Charles as an irresistible wedding-dance sound-track. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jun 03, 2022
      4/5
      Luzzu (2021) This terrifically atmospheric, almost documentary-like film tells the story of Jesmark, a real-life Maltese fisherman (Jesmark Scicluna). It also encapsulates a dying culture. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted May 27, 2022
      4/5
      The Quiet Girl (2022) Much of the dialogue in Colm Bairéad's beautiful, mainly Irish-language film, which is in many ways about the power of silence, is reproduced unchanged from Keegan's book. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted May 12, 2022
      4/5
      The Wall of Shadows (2020) This beautiful, meditative film by director and climber Eliza Kubarska captures the power of the Himalayas with great intensity. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2022
      4/5
      The Northman (2022) It’s rather ripe for parodying, though you can’t deny the film’s power and scale as well as the beauty and strangeness of the landscape, in turn green and lush and black and icy. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Apr 15, 2022
      3/5
      Médecin de nuit (2021) Elie Wajeman’s moodily lit film noir is, among other things, a great advertisement for the French healthcare system. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Feb 08, 2022
      3/5
      The Eyes of Tammy Faye (2021) It’s all a bit insubstantial, shallow and predictable, often verging on SNL-esque parody, though Chastain portrays the giggling Tammy Faye with a huge amount of vim and vigour and Garfield does a creditable turn as nattily clad, boyish Jim. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Feb 04, 2022
      3/5
      A Hero (2021) As Farhadi has said, daily life can be repetitive and boring, and in its search for realism A Hero seems sometimes to cross that line. However the feeling of chaotic bureaucracy... is powerful. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jan 07, 2022
      5/5
      Hope (2019) You take nothing for granted in this honest, beautiful movie, which never strays into sentimental terminal-romance territory and is shot by Lars von Trier's regular DP Manuel Alberto Claro. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2021
      3/5
      Mothering Sunday (2021) Odessa Young's terrific performance saves it from becoming just another attractive, class-ridden period drama with splendid costumes by Sandy Powell and Colin Firth and Olivia Colman as reassuring stock-in-trades. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Nov 12, 2021
      3/5
      Quant (2021) Sadie Frost's debut documentary, though lively, does not deliver much that we don't already know. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Oct 27, 2021
      4/5
      Gagarine (2020) [An] extraordinarily original, glowing debut feature. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Sep 27, 2021
      4/5
      Rose Plays Julie (2019) Slow-moving, sombre, alienated and beautiful, its pace is underpinned by Stephen McKeon's ominous score. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Sep 20, 2021
      4/5
      Second Spring (2018) The eerie, clanging dissonance of trombonist Peter Zummo's score is a perfect accompaniment to this unsettling, open-ended story. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Sep 07, 2021
      4/5
      Candyman (2021) DaCosta's film packs a hauntingly disturbing, gory punch, with racial politics and revenge, as well as questions of artistic integrity, as significant tropes. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Aug 30, 2021
      4/5
      Riders of Justice (2020) The quirky mix of philosophy, fairy tale, violence and psychological truth means that Riders of Justice delivers on every level. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2021
      4/5
      Two of Us (2019) The virtuoso performances from Sukowa and Chevallier carry the day in this sensitively directed film, where every sound contains depth and beauty. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jul 19, 2021
      4/5
      Shiva Baby (2020) Emma Seligman's debut feature, which began as a short in her film studies degree at New York University, is full of energy in its exploration of the dynamics of sex, power and career, with lox and bagels on the side. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2021
      3/5
      The Artist's Wife (2019) You never get much sense of what the relationship was like before Richard became ill so it's hard to mourn its loss, unlike in other films about dementia... - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted May 17, 2021
      3/5
      End of Sentence (2019) That's life. Move on," is a motto that Frank passes on to Sean, and it seems a fair way to sum up the texture of this thoughtful, unassuming film. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted May 17, 2021
      4/5
      True Mothers (2020) Hiraki's subtle performance, full of raw emotion and grit, forms a good contrast to the muted notes of the Kuriharas. And who's to say, in the end, which of them is the true mother? - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Apr 19, 2021
      3/5
      Mouthpiece (2018) Leah Fay's choreography and the haunting, humming music composed by Nostbakken carry the film along to its surreal and poignant resolution. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Apr 02, 2021
      4/5
      Minari (2020) You sometimes wish for more detail, more connection between the scenes, but there's still something wonderfully positive and uplifting about the whole. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Apr 02, 2021
      3/5
      Bliss (2021) Fun? Quite tiresome, actually. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Feb 22, 2021
      4/5
      Kajillionaire (2020) Kajillionaire is about growing up, a painful, awkward, everyday love story, but no one tells it like Miranda July. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2021
      4/5
      Saint Frances (2019) Talking about awkward things without shame is what this film endorses - and does well. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Feb 05, 2021
      4/5
      Pieces of a Woman (2020) The authenticity of Vanessa Kirby's remarkable performance shines through. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Jan 11, 2021
      4/5
      Falling (2020) The film revolves around Henriksen's extraordinarily energetic, powerful performance. He's a demented dad from hell. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Dec 08, 2020
      3/5
      The Other Lamb (2019) If this is a parable about masculinity and power, it doesn't come off. - The Arts Desk
      Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2020
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