Reviews

  • Oct 17, 2021

    Dicaprio is impressive as always...but the story is very difficult to follow

    Dicaprio is impressive as always...but the story is very difficult to follow

  • Oct 09, 2021

    Excellent lone-wolf intelligence terrorist snakehead tracking action, unbelievable Uzi can be like a sniper. Guess Ed can really use wireless communication even better bone conduction earphone. Really dogs wandering all over the space in 95% Muslim country??

    Excellent lone-wolf intelligence terrorist snakehead tracking action, unbelievable Uzi can be like a sniper. Guess Ed can really use wireless communication even better bone conduction earphone. Really dogs wandering all over the space in 95% Muslim country??

  • Sep 15, 2021

    Been a while since I've seen it so, I'll just give it three and a half for now. But I remember enjoying it, hence this rating.

    Been a while since I've seen it so, I'll just give it three and a half for now. But I remember enjoying it, hence this rating.

  • Sep 02, 2021

    Ridley Scott's foray into the world of surveillance in the middle east was pretty much panned across the board on release. As a Scott fan, when this reaction also met Kingdom Of Heaven (2005) I still felt it necessary to give it a go, and even went so far as purchasing the Directors Cut. Sadly it was rubbish. Happily, Body Of Lies is nowhere near as dull as Kingdom Of Heaven. Leonardo DiCaprio is Russell Crowe's agent on the ground all over the map (Iraq, Jordan, Syria amongst others) essentially gaining information to tackle the war on terror. Body Of Lies moves at breakneck speed, and there's no doubt that its pace makes it easier to forget its gaping plot holes and non-sensical decision making by some of those whose job it is makes these calls. DiCaprio ends up inventing a terrorist cell to coax a terrorist into the light for capture; it borders on ludicrousness but the editing is so swift in cutting and chopping you away from thinking about how and why this happening, you simply don't notice until afterwards. It's also helped in its attempted authenticity by a terrific performance from Mark Strong as the Jordanian General Intelligence Directorate, and a far too short cameo from Oscar Isaac early on. All in all Body Of Lies is a mess of a film, but it's a very entertaining one, and watching it in the current climate probably lends to the authenticity of the horrors on screen here.

    Ridley Scott's foray into the world of surveillance in the middle east was pretty much panned across the board on release. As a Scott fan, when this reaction also met Kingdom Of Heaven (2005) I still felt it necessary to give it a go, and even went so far as purchasing the Directors Cut. Sadly it was rubbish. Happily, Body Of Lies is nowhere near as dull as Kingdom Of Heaven. Leonardo DiCaprio is Russell Crowe's agent on the ground all over the map (Iraq, Jordan, Syria amongst others) essentially gaining information to tackle the war on terror. Body Of Lies moves at breakneck speed, and there's no doubt that its pace makes it easier to forget its gaping plot holes and non-sensical decision making by some of those whose job it is makes these calls. DiCaprio ends up inventing a terrorist cell to coax a terrorist into the light for capture; it borders on ludicrousness but the editing is so swift in cutting and chopping you away from thinking about how and why this happening, you simply don't notice until afterwards. It's also helped in its attempted authenticity by a terrific performance from Mark Strong as the Jordanian General Intelligence Directorate, and a far too short cameo from Oscar Isaac early on. All in all Body Of Lies is a mess of a film, but it's a very entertaining one, and watching it in the current climate probably lends to the authenticity of the horrors on screen here.

  • Aug 17, 2021

    This has to be the worst Leo DiCaprio movie I have ever witnessed in my life. I lost track of the story almost immediately, and I lost interest shortly thereafter. The side romance was the only part of the story I could actually follow, and the leading lady could not act at all. I had no idea what the stakes were the entire time, but I knew something was at stake because the music told me so. And then it ends with me still not knowing what happened & no desire to watch a second time to figure it out.

    This has to be the worst Leo DiCaprio movie I have ever witnessed in my life. I lost track of the story almost immediately, and I lost interest shortly thereafter. The side romance was the only part of the story I could actually follow, and the leading lady could not act at all. I had no idea what the stakes were the entire time, but I knew something was at stake because the music told me so. And then it ends with me still not knowing what happened & no desire to watch a second time to figure it out.

  • Jun 06, 2021

    This is perfectly good entertainment that rises on the performances of the cast (DiCaprio, Crowe and the always underrated Strong are all great), but the fact remains that the narrative feels extremely familiar and does nothing that we haven't seen many times before. Don't get me wrong, it's far from boring and it has a number of exciting and tense scenes, it's just that they're nothing new. Now, this was made back in 2008 and perhaps it felt fresher back then, but over a decade later it feels like a well-cast thriller that lacks most of what it would need to stand out which isn't something you expect of a Ridley Scott film.

    This is perfectly good entertainment that rises on the performances of the cast (DiCaprio, Crowe and the always underrated Strong are all great), but the fact remains that the narrative feels extremely familiar and does nothing that we haven't seen many times before. Don't get me wrong, it's far from boring and it has a number of exciting and tense scenes, it's just that they're nothing new. Now, this was made back in 2008 and perhaps it felt fresher back then, but over a decade later it feels like a well-cast thriller that lacks most of what it would need to stand out which isn't something you expect of a Ridley Scott film.

  • Feb 10, 2021

    A generic CIA tale with ridiculous 'hacking' sequences and a romance side plot. The acting was solid, especially from Leonardo, but the writing was nothing new. The main character's boss was completely unbelievable, all of the tech sequences were laughably unrealistic, and the ending was predictable. With that said, the pacing, cinematography, visual effects, and soundtrack were all fine, although far from the best. The action was also all right but there could have been more. Very average but Leo's performance makes it watchable.

    A generic CIA tale with ridiculous 'hacking' sequences and a romance side plot. The acting was solid, especially from Leonardo, but the writing was nothing new. The main character's boss was completely unbelievable, all of the tech sequences were laughably unrealistic, and the ending was predictable. With that said, the pacing, cinematography, visual effects, and soundtrack were all fine, although far from the best. The action was also all right but there could have been more. Very average but Leo's performance makes it watchable.

  • Feb 02, 2021

    Well, Ridley Scott certainly was cranking them out around this point, wasn't he? There had been a significant amount of time between some of his earlier films, as opposed to around the mid-point of the noughties where he seems to have made a film per year. That can have a problematic effect on the overall quality; you can have hits like American Gangster and Matchstick Men or complete bombs like A Good Year. In the case of Body of Lies, it seems to fall in between. The plot is based around American and Arab relations and communications during the Obama era, and how surveillance and technological interference can possibly have a negative impact down the line. Leonardo DiCaprio plays Roger Ferris, a field officer who is assigned to track down a terrorist named Al-Saleem, the leader of a terrorist organisation, which is linked with Al Qaeda. After a meeting with an informant in Iraq goes horribly wrong, a series of bombings strike, one in Amsterdam and Manchester. Ferris proceeds to go to Jordan to seek him out. With Ed played by Russell Crowe the CIA's head man in the East division, communicating with him from an earpiece from the United States. Agreeing to partner up with Jordan's head of the general intelligence directorate Hani Salaam played by Mark Strong for information about Al-Saleem, he soon becomes involved and entangled in a web of deceit and political unrest. Thrown into this is a nurse named Aisha played by Golshifteh Farahani, who Ferris becomes dangerously involved with and which could affect not only his position but also their lives as things get too deep in. The film raises an issue which remains a hot debate. The use of surveillance to spy on and observe Eastern countries for the sake of security. It's one that rages on, and the film here clearly doesn't sugarcoat the issue. In fact, the film SO doesn't sugarcoat the issue almost to the point of heavy-handedness. I will say that Leonardo DiCaprio is good with a role which asks him not to reveal too much. As well as, Russell Crowe who is active as someone who is sly and slick as he hides behind the earpiece. However, the best performance in the whole film is Mark Strong. Who not only manages to be calm, collected and effectively suave but is by far the most engaging performance of the film. I think the biggest problem for me is an engagement level. I think the movie feels that what's happening, or perhaps not happening at all, is more interesting than it actually is. Even seeing everything through the lens of camera surveillance and observing conversations and debates about intel. I feel like I'm not being immersed in the drama as much as I am an outsider – which may be the point of the film – but that doesn't make it any more interesting. There are specific sequences of nail-biting tension and suspense whenever Leonardo DiCaprio's character deals with some extreme situations. Though, they feel more like a sequence of events rather than a flowing narrative. There is potential here for a hugely exciting story, and particularly with this being a real and problematic debate, it could have been much more. However, with Ridley Scott providing only reliable and not excellent direction and with William Monahan's script also unable to raise enough interest in the subject matter as much as it should do, I'm ultimately left feeling cold. The performances certainly raise themselves above the material and the cinematography by Alexander Witt, giving the film an almost voyeuristic and technically efficient eye. Unfortunately, the film's heavy-handed approach doesn't lend much to complete engagement, and at the very least, the film provides a debate to be discussed and thought out.

    Well, Ridley Scott certainly was cranking them out around this point, wasn't he? There had been a significant amount of time between some of his earlier films, as opposed to around the mid-point of the noughties where he seems to have made a film per year. That can have a problematic effect on the overall quality; you can have hits like American Gangster and Matchstick Men or complete bombs like A Good Year. In the case of Body of Lies, it seems to fall in between. The plot is based around American and Arab relations and communications during the Obama era, and how surveillance and technological interference can possibly have a negative impact down the line. Leonardo DiCaprio plays Roger Ferris, a field officer who is assigned to track down a terrorist named Al-Saleem, the leader of a terrorist organisation, which is linked with Al Qaeda. After a meeting with an informant in Iraq goes horribly wrong, a series of bombings strike, one in Amsterdam and Manchester. Ferris proceeds to go to Jordan to seek him out. With Ed played by Russell Crowe the CIA's head man in the East division, communicating with him from an earpiece from the United States. Agreeing to partner up with Jordan's head of the general intelligence directorate Hani Salaam played by Mark Strong for information about Al-Saleem, he soon becomes involved and entangled in a web of deceit and political unrest. Thrown into this is a nurse named Aisha played by Golshifteh Farahani, who Ferris becomes dangerously involved with and which could affect not only his position but also their lives as things get too deep in. The film raises an issue which remains a hot debate. The use of surveillance to spy on and observe Eastern countries for the sake of security. It's one that rages on, and the film here clearly doesn't sugarcoat the issue. In fact, the film SO doesn't sugarcoat the issue almost to the point of heavy-handedness. I will say that Leonardo DiCaprio is good with a role which asks him not to reveal too much. As well as, Russell Crowe who is active as someone who is sly and slick as he hides behind the earpiece. However, the best performance in the whole film is Mark Strong. Who not only manages to be calm, collected and effectively suave but is by far the most engaging performance of the film. I think the biggest problem for me is an engagement level. I think the movie feels that what's happening, or perhaps not happening at all, is more interesting than it actually is. Even seeing everything through the lens of camera surveillance and observing conversations and debates about intel. I feel like I'm not being immersed in the drama as much as I am an outsider – which may be the point of the film – but that doesn't make it any more interesting. There are specific sequences of nail-biting tension and suspense whenever Leonardo DiCaprio's character deals with some extreme situations. Though, they feel more like a sequence of events rather than a flowing narrative. There is potential here for a hugely exciting story, and particularly with this being a real and problematic debate, it could have been much more. However, with Ridley Scott providing only reliable and not excellent direction and with William Monahan's script also unable to raise enough interest in the subject matter as much as it should do, I'm ultimately left feeling cold. The performances certainly raise themselves above the material and the cinematography by Alexander Witt, giving the film an almost voyeuristic and technically efficient eye. Unfortunately, the film's heavy-handed approach doesn't lend much to complete engagement, and at the very least, the film provides a debate to be discussed and thought out.

  • Jan 19, 2021

    Body of Lies is a well shot, realistic thriller with good performances. It has a lot of nice middle Eastern colour, which I enjoyed. A good entry into Ridley Scott's filmography.

    Body of Lies is a well shot, realistic thriller with good performances. It has a lot of nice middle Eastern colour, which I enjoyed. A good entry into Ridley Scott's filmography.

  • Jan 17, 2021

    Sufficienza stiracchiata, guadagnata grazie alle solide interpretazioni dei protagonisti. Per il resto, la trama non offre spunti particolarmente interessante; una serie di operazioni mal riuscite da quelli che paiono essere gli agenti segreti peggiori degli USA. Finale in linea con le aspettative.

    Sufficienza stiracchiata, guadagnata grazie alle solide interpretazioni dei protagonisti. Per il resto, la trama non offre spunti particolarmente interessante; una serie di operazioni mal riuscite da quelli che paiono essere gli agenti segreti peggiori degli USA. Finale in linea con le aspettative.