Our Daily Bread

1934, Drama, 1h 14m

13 Reviews 100+ Ratings

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Movie Info

Urbanites John (Tom Keene) and Mary Sims (Karen Morley) are facing eviction for lack of work when Mary's uncle (Lloyd Ingraham) proposes they take over an abandoned farm. Ignorant about agriculture, the couple nevertheless accepts, and are fortunate enough to meet a Swedish farmer (John Qualen) who offers his assistance. As the farm begins to prosper, John is inspired to form a collective, inviting others to help farm and share in the profits. Things go awry, however, when a drought occurs.

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Critic Reviews for Our Daily Bread

All Critics (13) | Top Critics (2) | Fresh (11) | Rotten (2)

Audience Reviews for Our Daily Bread

  • May 02, 2013
    possibly the most socialist film ever to come from hollywood, vidor had to finance this sequel to 'the crowd' himself, with assistance from his friend charlie chaplin. stick around for the final sequence, one of the finest vidor ever filmed. interesting that, ten years later, he became a founding member of the 'motion picture alliance for the preservation of american ideals' which supplied the vast majority of friendly witnesses to the house un-american activities committee.
    Stella D Super Reviewer
  • Aug 30, 2010
    In "Our Daily Bread," Mary(Karen Morley) and John Sims(Tom Keene) have gone so long without work that they have to sell everything that is not nailed down to have money for food. Even a wealthy relative(Lloyd Ingraham) is going through harsh times and he cannot offer him employment. What he can do is give them access to a piece of land he owns that they can farm. However, that is not as easy as it looks. Luckily, Chris(John Qualen), a friendly Swedish farmer, happens by to help out, giving them the idea to put up signs that attract dozens of skilled and unskilled workers. In the prologue to his film "Our Daily Bread," director King Vidor says he made the film as a way of dramatizing the back to the land movement during the Great Depression.(See, the hippies did not invent the commune, just the naked frolicking part.) So, while there are important themes from this movie that are relevant today, it is actually a bit dated and dramatically uneven. On the upside, the movie does not sugarcoat the risks of the farm, gets the fear of the knock at the door right and the climax is absolutely riveting and rousing.
    Walter M Super Reviewer
  • Jan 30, 2010
    I mildly enjoyed this old movie, but the acting (or lack thereof) really bothered me.
    Andrew F Super Reviewer
  • Oct 10, 2009
    This month Turner Classic Movies is running a marathon of movies made in or set during The Great Depression, I decided it would be cool to watch all the movies from the marathon I had yet to see. The first one was this depression era King Vidor film about a group of dissatisfied workers who join together to form a communal farm. This is a historically interesting concept and as an artifact this movie is very interesting. However, it does suffer from a lot of 1930s melodrama and acting and for a lot of its running time it felt more like a curiosity than a truly great film. What won me over was the film?s climactic scene in which the workers race to build an irrigation canal over a long distance to save their crops. This is simply an amazing set piece and it alone is worth sitting through the film?s short run time to see.
    MJS M Super Reviewer

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