Rebecca - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Rebecca Reviews

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March 16, 2018
Follows the epic book decently well with some nice little touches that only Hitchcock could get away with.
½ March 8, 2018
Aussi intéressant qu'il soit, Rebecca est un film qui a vraiment beaucoup vieilli au niveau du rythme ou de la mise en scène, ce qui peut paraître étrange dans la filmographie d'alfred hitchcock. Mais quand laurence olivier et joan fontaine brillent de mille feux, on peut clairement se demander si cette histoire n'aurait pas pu être racontée en moins de deux heures et quart. rebecca s'écroule quasiment dans les 30 dernières minutes où on est sur de la redite constante, malgré des décors remarquables.
½ March 8, 2018
A dark mystery drama and early success for Alfred Hitchcock.
March 3, 2018
If you can forgive "Rebecca" for its slower scenes and dialog heavy delivery, you'll find a well-crafted Hollywood romance film where Lawrence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, and Judith Anderson are all absolutely fantastic in their roles. Furthermore, with this being one of Alfred Hitchcock's earlier works, he brings a quirky and gothic direction to the picture to help keep "Rebecca" from being too draggy. It also has hints of his trademark camera work and suspenseful story pacing that he would later go on to perfect in better films than this. Don't get me wrong though, like I've said, this is an all around solid romance with the benefits of golden age Hollywood to boost its dark beauty.
March 3, 2018
It started out really well. Joan Fontaine played the ingenue very well. But by the second half of the movie, things kind of petered out to a safe plateau with really no suspense. The viewer does not really feel any sexual pull between our main characters, just a faning gratefulness flowing from Joan's character to be plucked by Laurence from her lowly role in society to be the lap dog of Laurence. It was odd to see a movie called "Rebecca", hear about Rebecca all through the movie, yet not even see a picture of Rebecca. This movie just cries out for a few "Rebecca" flashbacks to give it some meat. Not a good adaptation of Daphne Du Maurier's novel. Someone should remake this movie and do it right.
January 15, 2018
Great book and great movie. One of hitchcocks best. 1001 movies to see before you die.
½ December 8, 2017
Feels like probably this was Hitchcock's first "modern" serious film. Nice work indeed.
November 25, 2017
Jeez, that Ms. Harper is one insufferable fat cunt. No wonder she's all alone. Envious, class conscious, self-centered.

The set pieces are really pretty especially the mansion where De Winter lives. The new Mrs. De Winter is very charming and lovely to watch. Once she stepped foot inside Mandalay, I knew that things were going to turn sour. There were creepy undertones ever since she stepped foot inside that mansion. Beautifully and wonderfully an atmospheric movie to behold.

You can't help but feel sorry for what Mrs. De Winter is going through. She's so helpless and the afraid. And Ms. Danvers sure is a cruel cunt.

There's this unexplainable feeling in the movie that keeps you watching, waiting to see what the outcome will be of Mrs. De Winter. There's this impalpable feeling that things are going to go wrong or that there's this big surprise at the end. This is the outcome of brilliant writing from Sir Alfred Hitchcock.

The last part of the movie becomes very intriguing to watch, as everything comes out on the table. The brilliant dialogue really makes itself shown in the last part as well between characters.

Overall, this movie is downright brilliant! Wonderful acting from everyone and beautiful writing and storytelling. The way everything unfolds is definitely a sight to behold.
½ October 23, 2017
One of Hitchcock's more epically told non-thriller romances, Rebecca has deep layers and intricate filmmaking that is showcased in nearly every scene, though with a few acting stumbles.
½ October 15, 2017
Led by outstanding performances from Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine, Hitchcock's masterpiece showcases the filmmaker's talent to create a well-crafted psychological suspense.
October 2, 2017
'Rebecca' is both detached and essential within Hitchcock's lifetime work. Though it has the touches of its filmmaker, it is also different, for it has its mystical depth. It is such an accomplished movie, being so pictorial and meticulous, and whose eerie characters mesmerize, whether it be the living, anonymous main character or the eponymous, dead and omnipresent Rebecca. In a film which mixes so well the dead and the alive, Laurence Olivier at the frontier, a fourth character, Judith Anderson most particularly fascinates, as the dire, diabolically mad Mrs. Danvers. But 'Rebecca', above all, is a thrill-maker, ghostly and gothic, craftily harrowing, unduplicatable and unforgettable, a movie which inspired the greatest, Orson Welles included (there's much of Manderly in Xanadu, both in its interior or exterior).
September 25, 2017
'Rebecca' is both detached and essential within Hitchcock's lifetime work. Though it has the touches of its filmmaker, it is also different, for it has its mystical depth. It is such an accomplished movie, being so pictorial and meticulous, and whose eerie characters mesmerize, whether it be the living, anonymous main character or the eponymous, dead and omnipresent Rebecca. In a film which mixes so well the dead and the alive, Laurence Olivier at the frontier, a fourth character, Judith Anderson most particularly fascinates, as the dire, diabolically mad Mrs. Danvers. But 'Rebecca', above all, is a thrill-maker, ghostly and gothic, craftily harrowing, unduplicatable and unforgettable, a movie which inspired the greatest, Orson Welles included (there's much of Manderly in Xanadu, both in its interior or exterior).
September 24, 2017
Amazing early Hitchcock. Judith Anderson as Ms Danvers is one of the great performances. Cinematography and score perfect
½ September 18, 2017
If nothing else, Rebecca proves that Hitchcock is truly the master of suspense. He took what is perhaps one of the more innocuous scripts he's directed and managed to make me feel uneasy a number of times. I felt tension over what would happen next when a woman puts on a particular dress! That shouldn't be so powerful, and yet I was gritting my teeth because I knew something was coming. I mean there is some suspense in the plot, and they keep it mysterious most of the time, but not so much that I should be this intrigued.

Joan Fontaine is amazing in the lead role, because she has that wholesome innocence. If I were to make any complaint about her in the role, it would be the fact that the film is trying to sell us on the idea that she looks plain and is less beautiful than Rebecca. Laurence Olivier is also great as the husband with something to hide. He brings a subtlety that is tough to get right, because he can be warm and likable in one scene and then distant and intimidating in the next. Also of note is Judith Anderson who is just the right level of scary.

I just wish there was more to the story in Rebecca. It started with a lot of promise, and I sensed that something bigger was going on, so I was totally hooked. When things were revealed I instantly thought "Is that it?" I actually lost interest and the whole movie kind of deflated. Reflecting on it now, days later, I wonder if it was just something to do with my false expectations. I wanted something bigger and some Psycho-style shocking conclusion. So I will readily admit that the film is probably better than I was able to recognize initially.
September 6, 2017
Rebecca is a prime example of Hitchcock's ability to be both ahead of his time and the master of suspense. Hitchcock uses the characters of the film to create a mysterious and haunting plot where the most frightening, and fascinating, being that of Rebecca the former Mrs. de Winter whom is supposedly dead. Laurence Olivier gives a perfectly craft performance as an vulnerable widower and Joan Fontaine as a shy and awkward newly wed but with a charm and beauty that pleads her case. Although there was a stellar cast it is Judith Anderson that steals the show with her creeping around the characters, never blinking and being the overall focal point of the suspense letting the very soul of Rebecca live throughout the story.
September 6, 2017
The mystery is the best developed I've ever seen because it has the ability to have the twists and continue to twist them.
August 25, 2017
Spell-binding Hitchcock film - his only to win a well-deserved Academy Award for best picture. This film is very true to Daphne du Maurier's novel, and elicits fear and suspense from the banal. Excellent pacing with a surprising twist.
August 24, 2017
1940 Hitchcock's first American film (and his only Best Picture winner), Rebecca is a masterpiece of haunting atmosphere, Gothic thrills, and gripping suspense The acting is uniformly excellent. Olivier is the hardened Maxim de Winter, untitled lord of Manderly, trying to forget the past and given to unexpected bouts of anger and coldheartedness. Fontaine is perfect as the unnamed mousy heroine, innocent yet deeply in love, still carrying with her the aura of an awkward schoolgirl. But it is Judith Anderson's role as Mrs. Danvers that viewers are likely to remember best. Her presence is as dark and foreboding as that of the deceased Rebecca herself, and Fontaine is evidently cowed by her icy stare and unnervingly formal manner. The dynamics between the two actresses are wonderful. In a line-up of great motion pictures, "Rebecca" stands as one of the giants. It is arguably Hitchcock's greatest film effort
½ July 31, 2017
Not what I would call peak Hitchcock (it only had some of the qualities of his later films) but definitely enthralling. I liked the beginning where the two leads meet and fall in love, and I liked the twists in the last 30 minutes. The middle part is a little more of a slow burn. Mrs. Danvers is very creepy, and George Sanders does a good job making Favell detestable in a small role. I like that you can't quite figure out through most of the movie whether Maxim is a good guy or a bad guy. It's a solid movie, I can see why it won Best Picture.
½ July 14, 2017
Taut and fluid, Rebecca was a way ahead of its time in all aspects, especially the direction, in which Alfred Hitchcock brings his own, inimitable style to some of the most ingenious material ever brought to the screen.
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