Sleuth Reviews

  • Jan 14, 2021

    An electric experience featuring two of the all time best. While most of the brilliance is due to the source material, the performers and the direction create a gripping piece. Strong design and camera work ensure the single location never grows stale.

    An electric experience featuring two of the all time best. While most of the brilliance is due to the source material, the performers and the direction create a gripping piece. Strong design and camera work ensure the single location never grows stale.

  • Dec 25, 2020

    One twist to bind them all, in the middle of the movie. I will never forget the first time, I saw this movie. One of my All-time-favorite Movies since then.

    One twist to bind them all, in the middle of the movie. I will never forget the first time, I saw this movie. One of my All-time-favorite Movies since then.

  • Oct 19, 2020

    Joseph Mankiewicz' Sleuth, the last film of his legendary career, features Laurence Olivier and Michael Caine as Andrew Wyke and Milo Tindle, two men engaged in a battle of wits over the love of Wyke's wife. Set primarily inside a country estate in England, the set pieces are spectacular and the scenes are expertly blocked, as would be expected from an adaptation of a play. Olivier and Caine seem to be having a blast with Anthony Shaffer's screenplay, which keeps the audience guessing right up to the final scene. Olivier may be hamming it up a bit at times with a periodically overly theatrical performance, but that's a minor complaint about an otherwise wildly entertaining film.

    Joseph Mankiewicz' Sleuth, the last film of his legendary career, features Laurence Olivier and Michael Caine as Andrew Wyke and Milo Tindle, two men engaged in a battle of wits over the love of Wyke's wife. Set primarily inside a country estate in England, the set pieces are spectacular and the scenes are expertly blocked, as would be expected from an adaptation of a play. Olivier and Caine seem to be having a blast with Anthony Shaffer's screenplay, which keeps the audience guessing right up to the final scene. Olivier may be hamming it up a bit at times with a periodically overly theatrical performance, but that's a minor complaint about an otherwise wildly entertaining film.

  • Jul 29, 2020

    A well done movie but unfortunately it doesn't age well. The story itself is well made, the main characters play well (especially Caine) but somehow it's not as smooth for today's age

    A well done movie but unfortunately it doesn't age well. The story itself is well made, the main characters play well (especially Caine) but somehow it's not as smooth for today's age

  • Jul 20, 2020

    If you like GREAT ACTING by GREAT ACTORS, this movie was tailor-made for you. OUTSTANDING PLOT AND THE PROPS WILL BLOW YOU AWAY!

    If you like GREAT ACTING by GREAT ACTORS, this movie was tailor-made for you. OUTSTANDING PLOT AND THE PROPS WILL BLOW YOU AWAY!

  • Jul 19, 2020

    "We are from different worlds, you and me, Andrew. In mine, there was no time for bright fancies and happy inventions, no stopping for tea. The only game we played was to survive, or go to the wall. If you didn't win, you just didn't finish. Loser, lose all. You probably don't understand that." ♟ Take a pair of knighted celluloid icons whose accents embody the term ‘class conflict', hand them a scintillating script adapted by a playwright who penned the Broadway stage play of the same name, place both men under the expert eye of a directing virtuoso shooting his 22nd and final film, and what do you have after 138 minutes? A wickedly fun and devilish two-hander that's as sharp and stylish as it is overlong and tiring, resting on the shoulders of two very capable Oscar-nominated leads embroiled in a deadly game of cat-and-mouse. Sparing no corner of the lavish manor set as they swallow entire sequences whole, Sir Laurence Olivier and his young (!) dance partner delight in outwitting each other with acting acrobatics and highly intellectual jabs that are sure to leave a lasting impression on viewers, even if their mileage may vary as the picture runs short on steam heading into its third act. One would be remiss to forget the debuting efforts of Alec Cawthorne and John Matthews, their names appearing in the opening credits as another sly wink to the audience from American director and screen legend Joseph L. Mankiewicz. A daring thriller often imitated yet rarely duplicated, proved to be too difficult a task when a failed rehash was released to middling reviews and returns decades later, not to mention Deathtrap also featuring Sir Michael Caine. 7/10 detective doppelgängers.

    "We are from different worlds, you and me, Andrew. In mine, there was no time for bright fancies and happy inventions, no stopping for tea. The only game we played was to survive, or go to the wall. If you didn't win, you just didn't finish. Loser, lose all. You probably don't understand that." ♟ Take a pair of knighted celluloid icons whose accents embody the term ‘class conflict', hand them a scintillating script adapted by a playwright who penned the Broadway stage play of the same name, place both men under the expert eye of a directing virtuoso shooting his 22nd and final film, and what do you have after 138 minutes? A wickedly fun and devilish two-hander that's as sharp and stylish as it is overlong and tiring, resting on the shoulders of two very capable Oscar-nominated leads embroiled in a deadly game of cat-and-mouse. Sparing no corner of the lavish manor set as they swallow entire sequences whole, Sir Laurence Olivier and his young (!) dance partner delight in outwitting each other with acting acrobatics and highly intellectual jabs that are sure to leave a lasting impression on viewers, even if their mileage may vary as the picture runs short on steam heading into its third act. One would be remiss to forget the debuting efforts of Alec Cawthorne and John Matthews, their names appearing in the opening credits as another sly wink to the audience from American director and screen legend Joseph L. Mankiewicz. A daring thriller often imitated yet rarely duplicated, proved to be too difficult a task when a failed rehash was released to middling reviews and returns decades later, not to mention Deathtrap also featuring Sir Michael Caine. 7/10 detective doppelgängers.

  • Jul 17, 2020

    It is nowhere near as clever as it thinks it is.

    It is nowhere near as clever as it thinks it is.

  • Jan 25, 2020

    A staggering masterclass in acting from two icons, not to mention the superb direction from Joseph L. Mankiewicz, make this superior entertainment. The filmmaker's skills at messing with the audience is something to admire, and right out of the gate with the brilliant opening credits. Long but perfectly paced, Sleuth is one of the best films of 1972, which is some feat considering how many other classics came out that year.

    A staggering masterclass in acting from two icons, not to mention the superb direction from Joseph L. Mankiewicz, make this superior entertainment. The filmmaker's skills at messing with the audience is something to admire, and right out of the gate with the brilliant opening credits. Long but perfectly paced, Sleuth is one of the best films of 1972, which is some feat considering how many other classics came out that year.

  • Nov 27, 2019

    Unlike most murder mysteries, the film is as much about character as it is about plot development, as much about narrative twists as it is about turns of phrase. With overtones of class warfare matched by undertones of homosocial attraction and jealousy, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's meeting of the mind-games—pushing the barriers, planting seeds, putting their soul power to the karmic wheel—works just as well on a rewatch thanks to the outstanding performances Michael Caine, Laurence Olivier, and newcomer Alec Cawthorne, who bring these eccentric characters to life—and eventually for some, to death.

    Unlike most murder mysteries, the film is as much about character as it is about plot development, as much about narrative twists as it is about turns of phrase. With overtones of class warfare matched by undertones of homosocial attraction and jealousy, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's meeting of the mind-games—pushing the barriers, planting seeds, putting their soul power to the karmic wheel—works just as well on a rewatch thanks to the outstanding performances Michael Caine, Laurence Olivier, and newcomer Alec Cawthorne, who bring these eccentric characters to life—and eventually for some, to death.

  • Oct 23, 2019

    Thanks to a meticulous attention to detail, a wonderful screenplay and truly fantastic, witty and playful dialogue, Sleuth is a brilliant, consistently engaging chamber drama which benefits from many great twists and turns. Watching Laurence Olivier and Michael Caine square off through the entirety of this picture was incredibly entertaining, and a strong argument could be made that they have never been better than in this perfectly acted, very amusing mystery.

    Thanks to a meticulous attention to detail, a wonderful screenplay and truly fantastic, witty and playful dialogue, Sleuth is a brilliant, consistently engaging chamber drama which benefits from many great twists and turns. Watching Laurence Olivier and Michael Caine square off through the entirety of this picture was incredibly entertaining, and a strong argument could be made that they have never been better than in this perfectly acted, very amusing mystery.