Antichrist - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Antichrist Reviews

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September 17, 2017
Oh I'm sure there's plenty of artsy jerkoffery to be pulled from this slog, and I'll leave that to the more interested
½ August 31, 2017
Simply awful. Just because Lars von Trier CAN make a horror-porn flick doesn't mean he SHOULD make one.
August 31, 2017
Lars Von Trier is known for making controversial art films, and since I liked Nymphomaniac I thought of looking into his most controversial piece; Antichrist. Antichrist is a Drama-Horror telling the evilness of human grief and nature in three chapters. He and Her, yes those are the main characters' names, goes into a cabin in the woods to help Her cope with her fears and grief. The best thing this film offers is atmosphere and tones which is one of the most important aspect of a horror film. Just like in Nymphomaniac, the film sometimes suffers from distracting editing hiccups. There is one moment in Chapter 3 that shows repetitive writing in the dialogue. Antichrist is a great film for horror fans that can rope them into the art genre.
8.5/10
August 28, 2017
Psychologically and intellectually terrifying cabin in the woods horror movie as only Lars Von Trier could have done.
½ July 27, 2017
A Review of Antichrist

If there was ever a cinema "Antichrist", a vitriolic force opposed to the American Christian paradigm, it would be Lars Von Trier. Often despised by many patriotic film critics for his scathing anti-American sentiments (in clear display for movies like Dogville) Von Trier's dabbling into horror was a prophecy come true, as such a feral mind simply had to tackle this most cathartic of genres after making years of emotionally disturbing allegories.

In Antichrist, the director tells what is possibly his rawest, most personal film to date-it just so happens it involves infanticide, genital mutilation and spousal murder. The film begins with the unfortunate death of a married couple's toddler-aged son Nick. The fact that the husband and wife (unnamed in the film) were making love during his death does profound emotional damage to the couple's sex life, their happiness, and their marital trust. Through four chapters, the story explores the aftermath of death: grief, pain, despair, though the film eventually evolves into a metaphorical story of murder.

"He" as Willem Dafoe's character is named, is a therapist and decides to treat his grieving wife with psychotherapy. Taking her to a cabin in the woods, (not so subtly name "Eden") he uncovers his wife's secret fears, which are related to nature. As the sessions continue, she becomes increasingly erratic, culminating in "She" writing a thesis on the evil nature of women. She pressures him into abusive sex and eventually knocks him unconscious, leading to two disturbing scenes of mutilation; first done unto him, and then unto herself. The film culminates with a character-assassinating revelation regarding She, which could be a plot revelation or an imagined scenario, speaking to the parental guilt flowing in this movie like droplets of crimson blood. The ending to the film is surreal and involves brutality and mass gender conspiracy, which will undoubtedly provoke feminists, and the religiously inclined, who will pick up on the overtones of the biblical account of Adam and Eve.

Speaking of blood, rarely has blood looked so magical. Whereas Lars' previous films have devalued fancy sets and epic, cinematic camera angles, Antichrist packs a punch when it comes to filming the cruelty of man. He achieves a lyrical, Kubrickian quality to his on-screen violence, and as always this speaks volumes regarding Von Trier's own personal demons. The film maker's well-publicized bouts of anxiety, and mistrust translate perfectly to a grieving family's guilt-ridden complex, and in the final act, we see precisely where such mental illness leads-to the depths of despair, the end of life, and the bludgeoning of happiness. To grieve, to blame, is madness, or so suggests the film maker, shortly before setting the whole story on fire. (Literally and figuratively)

In terms of horror film making techniques, Lars proves himself a behind-the-camera technician as well as an abstract master of the screenplay. His brilliant use of operatic music (i.e. "Lascia ch'io pianga") captivates the audience, unsettling them for two hours of demonic emotions. He and Anthony Dod Mantle's cinematography is ultra-realistic, even while avoiding the "found footage" cliches that permeate student-made horror flicks today-probably because of effective use of subtle and non-visible "jump- cut editing".

He succeeds in creating not a world of dark reality, but a nightmarish and hypnotic sleep prison, using both hand held camera shots, motion control imagery and illustrative imagery that focus on anxiety. Lars Von Trier's greatest weaknesses in the minds of his critics are his greatest achievements for his fans; he makes creates realism to a fault (as you will see with explicit sex scenes, and gruesome torture porn-style violence), all the while drifting from reality to film elements of the bizarre, the damning, and the absurd.

His mixing of arousing sexual images with ugly, realistic carnage is assaulting to the viewer, while his biblical allusions are primal and felt, even without being logically understood.

Perhaps it is ironic that Lars Von Trier chose the first biblical tale, one concerning Good and Evil, in order to make his first true horror film. In horror what we observe is a polarized version of society; a victim and a monster; a good person and a bad person. The violence is not just the entitlement of Evil-it is the means to survive, even for good people who want to live in an unfair world.

In many ways, Antichrist is a meditative dichotomy; of good and evil, logic and emotion, male and female perspectives, human intelligence and the raw power of nature. While one could conclude that Antichrist is about the evil of humanity, this is a script that willfully provokes emotion and begs a personal interpretation from the viewer.

In the horror genre, we must accept what is "evil" as the antagonist or the anti-hero. In Antichrist, Lars Von Trier suggests that Nature is Satan's Church, that evil is everywhere, and that Woman (or Eve) was the ultimate downfall of Adam and mankind. It's the sort of stuff that a therapist, or a client in therapy, would find fascinating as a glimpse into one's own suppressed mind. For the traditional horror fan, however, Antichrist may be too cerebral, and too depressive, to entertain. Nevertheless, this uncompromising director succeeds in creating yet another film travesty that demands reaction.
½ July 23, 2017
The film seems to be a personal expression of the depression von Trier went through at the time. Misogyn, constant trembling of limbs. While the colours and angles, as well as the slo-mo start and end scenes are beatuiful, the film is very disturbing to watch, and has no point of relief. As much as it is brilliant, it is terrible. The film is a monster.
June 16, 2017
Well for starters, this movie has absolutely nothing to do with Satan raping a woman and making a baby. Nor is it murder death kill all throughout the movie. So get that out of your mind. This is a complete waste of money to even watch. It's about a couple who feel totally guilty about getting their child killed, something that happens with many couples. Then they spend over an hour grieving and having sex the entire time, hike to the woods, and have more sex. Then the woman finds out the man betrayed him hiding important information and she assaults him, later assaults her own self, then they get each other killed. Absolutely nothing to do with Satan.
½ June 6, 2017
Rather disappointing.
April 26, 2017
One of Lars von Trier's more polarizing films, Antichrist is brilliantly filmed, well-acted and above all terrifying. It is definitely not for the weak of stomach or the faint or heart.
½ April 23, 2017
Dice el Yino, que no entendió...
April 21, 2017
I Going To Make Feature-Length Movies When I Grow Up Which Only Will Be R-Rated.
April 20, 2017
The unusually mundane universe of von Trier possesses a discursive force so enigmatic that it describes in an arduous poetic way the impact of the most painful events that in an intense, hysterical and destructive way drown with torture a person and its huge mistakes, entering the nightmarish dream of an emotional hurricane about the darkest instincts of the human being. One of the most controversial films in the current history of cinema. 83/100
March 23, 2017
So intense and harrowing, I felt the very rare sensation of genuine dread. A bleak and satanic masterpiece.
½ March 12, 2017
Honestly, I'm not really sure what to say. I will have to put this in the "fucked up" category with Visitor Q.
February 8, 2017
I'll admit it. I didn't 'get it' but I was intrigued from start to finish. It was confusing but visually interesting. It was horrific in places but always symbolic. On further reading after the credits rolled, I feel that the discussion on it's actual meaning is open to interpretation and picking one is your choice.
½ January 16, 2017
Very well shot and acted, and also moves at a pretty big pace. But be warned it gets incredibly disturbing
½ January 14, 2017
"Art" can be really gross forcing you to turn away. I can do Tarantino-type stuff most of the time, but I just don't get this.
January 12, 2017
Probably one of the best films that you'll never recommend to anyone.
½ December 4, 2016
Though very difficult to take, this film was compelling and extremely ambitious. Lars Von Trier crafted a well-rounded, brilliant psychodrama.

This is the kind of film where I can tell that the director has a lot to say. Lars Von Trier has a way of communicating themes that's very unconventional. He uses graphic and explicit content in a way that immerses the audience, but doesn't sacrifice the integrity of the narrative. This film also has a visual grace about it that's oddly beautiful even though what he's showing us is horrific and disturbing. The prologue for this film is one of the most impressively shot sequences I've ever seen.

Another very impressive aspect of the film was the performances. There's only two to speak of, but they totally blew me away. Wilem Dafoe and Charlotte Gainsbourg are acting titans. They took so many risks and were so vulnerable, especially Gainsbourg. She put herself out there in a way I haven't seen in a long time, and I think that helped me to track with her when she went to those dark places in the last act.

This film was disturbing, ambitious, nasty, chaotic, compelling, dark, nightmarish, and, overall, extremely brilliant. One of the most haunting and original films I've ever seen!
December 3, 2016
One of the most disgusting films I've seen
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