5x2 Reviews

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April 1, 2006
September 18, 2005
Even while we're flipping through the snapshots of two people's ultimate disenchantment with each other, it never feels tawdry or excessive or, for that matter, very interesting.
August 18, 2005
A cool, sometimes chilly dissection of one couple's relationship.
July 29, 2005
Gilles and Marion may be more than the sum of their regrets, but because their creator hasn't done the math, they remain touching stick figures.
Top Critic
July 28, 2005
Stripping away the extraneous details that etch great screen characters in our minds forever, Mr. Ozon pinpoints key moments in the life of a pair of married Parisians that leave the viewer paralyzed with boredom and confusion.
July 22, 2005
Ozon, as he's shown in his many recent films (particularly Under the Sand), knows a thing or two about love and loss; 5x2 achingly demonstrates both.
July 7, 2005
Unwinds with absolute clarity and sure style, and Freiss and Bruni-Tedeschi make an interesting couple, if not a truly memorable one.
July 7, 2005
Neither Marion, with her melancholy stares, nor Gilles, with his detachment and his cigarettes, appears more than a character sketch.
July 1, 2005
It's fascinating, like watching the collapse of a building in reverse.
July 1, 2005
The film is Bergman's Scenes From a Marriage without the boring parts -- wait, I'm not supposed to say that.
June 24, 2005
The inevitability of the conceit could wear on us, were it not for the lived-in performances of the cast, most important Bruni-Tedeschi and Freiss.
June 24, 2005
You can get an idea of the two seemingly contradictory truths about this movie: It's not much fun, and it's impossible to stop watching.
June 24, 2005
We never get to know the twosome, and the intense curiosity generated by the opening scene starts to wane severely.
June 17, 2005
[Seems] less like scenes from a marriage than highlights from a gay man's fevered nightmare of what it would be like to be a straight married couple.
June 16, 2005
Absent a meaty rationale, reading the story of a marriage backward smacks of derivative gimmickry.
June 10, 2005
Ozon is a smart filmmaker, but he doesn't go nearly as deep as Bergman did.
June 10, 2005
Franois Ozon uses reverse chronology to tell the story of a failed marriage. The device is not exactly a novelty, but it does make some dramatic sense in this case.
June 9, 2005
a mature portrait of a relationship's thorny complexity
June 9, 2005
Bruno-Tedeschi has one of those alert, off-kilter screen faces that burn with light and intelligence even as their characters slide into darkness: a tragedienne of the first order.
June 8, 2005
Ozon stages each scene so assuredly, with such a fluid sense of motive and desire, that I assumed we'd witness how even the best of intentions, from each party, could strand a marriage on the rocks. But no.
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