9 1/2 Weeks Reviews

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best romance movie ever made!

    The best romance movie ever made!

  • Jan 22, 2019

    They say every relationship has a breaking point. One can assume the more unconventional the relationship, the worse the breaking point will be. An employee at an art gallery (Kim Basinger) starts a torrid affair with a mysterious, closed off arbitrageur (Mickey Rourke) she first spies at a butcher shop in Chinatown. Taking place over the titular duration of time, it's interesting to watch such a small slice of peoples' lives played out across the silver screen with very little beginning or end. Just one moment in time that adds a dollop of paint upon a larger picture we will never see. It's also interesting to see the role reversal that takes place as the character we believe to be the sad, tragic figure looking for something more in their lives isn't necessarily the one we suspect it to be at the start. Basinger, to this day, has been one of the most beautiful women in the world and here she was at the peak of her libidinous prowess. Rourke, on the other hand, was just learning the power of his own smoldering presence, which gives him an uncertain edge necessary to breathe life into his character. There's surprisingly little actual nudity considering the premise of the film revolves around an S&M theme, meaning the tension and sensuality take the viewer in a much more intimate direction than they might be prepared to handle. There's no tawdriness here; only erotic and psychological revelation that's a bit more uncomfortable than the actual nudity might have been. Say what you will about director Adrian Lyne's choice of cinematic subject matter, he has always had an eye for space and has never shown it off quite so effectively as in this film. He directs people through crowds as easily as he directs them in more secretive settings. He knows how to occupy almost any given space and that's an often overlooked talent that not every director possesses. Peter Biziou instills a very Japanese quality into his cinematography. The monochromatic color design merely serves to deepen the shock at seeing swathes of green, blue, and red which are used sparingly throughout the movie. Jack Nitzsche's score reminds me of the work Bill Conti was putting out in the early Eighties, which is certainly not a bad thing as there are worse composers one could seek to emulate. Overall, I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this film. Its pieces come together to form a complex puzzle that left me wanting more upon its conclusion.

    They say every relationship has a breaking point. One can assume the more unconventional the relationship, the worse the breaking point will be. An employee at an art gallery (Kim Basinger) starts a torrid affair with a mysterious, closed off arbitrageur (Mickey Rourke) she first spies at a butcher shop in Chinatown. Taking place over the titular duration of time, it's interesting to watch such a small slice of peoples' lives played out across the silver screen with very little beginning or end. Just one moment in time that adds a dollop of paint upon a larger picture we will never see. It's also interesting to see the role reversal that takes place as the character we believe to be the sad, tragic figure looking for something more in their lives isn't necessarily the one we suspect it to be at the start. Basinger, to this day, has been one of the most beautiful women in the world and here she was at the peak of her libidinous prowess. Rourke, on the other hand, was just learning the power of his own smoldering presence, which gives him an uncertain edge necessary to breathe life into his character. There's surprisingly little actual nudity considering the premise of the film revolves around an S&M theme, meaning the tension and sensuality take the viewer in a much more intimate direction than they might be prepared to handle. There's no tawdriness here; only erotic and psychological revelation that's a bit more uncomfortable than the actual nudity might have been. Say what you will about director Adrian Lyne's choice of cinematic subject matter, he has always had an eye for space and has never shown it off quite so effectively as in this film. He directs people through crowds as easily as he directs them in more secretive settings. He knows how to occupy almost any given space and that's an often overlooked talent that not every director possesses. Peter Biziou instills a very Japanese quality into his cinematography. The monochromatic color design merely serves to deepen the shock at seeing swathes of green, blue, and red which are used sparingly throughout the movie. Jack Nitzsche's score reminds me of the work Bill Conti was putting out in the early Eighties, which is certainly not a bad thing as there are worse composers one could seek to emulate. Overall, I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this film. Its pieces come together to form a complex puzzle that left me wanting more upon its conclusion.

  • Aug 19, 2018

    sad and realistic drama.

    sad and realistic drama.

  • Apr 20, 2018

    this could have been a great movie if she came back, and if the lead female was better looking than her cast

    this could have been a great movie if she came back, and if the lead female was better looking than her cast

  • Feb 14, 2018

    50 Shades is a total copycat of this movie, but this was done so much better.

    50 Shades is a total copycat of this movie, but this was done so much better.

  • Jan 09, 2018

    Nine 1/2 Weeks is a lot more steamy, romantic and interesting then 2015’s Fifty Shades Of Grey in every single way. The characters are real, the sex scenes are steamier and the romance is actually genuine. Watch this one instead

    Nine 1/2 Weeks is a lot more steamy, romantic and interesting then 2015’s Fifty Shades Of Grey in every single way. The characters are real, the sex scenes are steamier and the romance is actually genuine. Watch this one instead

  • Sep 16, 2017

    It's actually kind of a sad story about sex addiction.

    It's actually kind of a sad story about sex addiction.

  • Nov 09, 2016

    A blast from the past about a divorcée's fatal attraction in a playboy with indecent proposals can give FIFTY SHADES OF GREY a run for its money. Alas, as needlessly tantalising too.

    A blast from the past about a divorcée's fatal attraction in a playboy with indecent proposals can give FIFTY SHADES OF GREY a run for its money. Alas, as needlessly tantalising too.

  • Sep 14, 2016

    Doesn't make sense, she is scared of him and leaves and then gets flowers and likes him. Don't like his character, thinks he is cool and has a half smile. She is sexy, no eyebrows. Music doesn't match, nothing too erotic.

    Doesn't make sense, she is scared of him and leaves and then gets flowers and likes him. Don't like his character, thinks he is cool and has a half smile. She is sexy, no eyebrows. Music doesn't match, nothing too erotic.

  • Sep 02, 2016

    An utterly awful film because the only thing it cares about is sex, and anything else might as well not be there. It makes the inevitable ending offensive because the entire movie celebrates complete depravity, and then feigns a critical perspective at the ending which is obviously tacked on to try to make sense of the insane hedonism of the thing.

    An utterly awful film because the only thing it cares about is sex, and anything else might as well not be there. It makes the inevitable ending offensive because the entire movie celebrates complete depravity, and then feigns a critical perspective at the ending which is obviously tacked on to try to make sense of the insane hedonism of the thing.