The Americanization of Emily Reviews

  • Feb 15, 2020

    A great romcom with an audacious thesis on patriotism, love, and country.

    A great romcom with an audacious thesis on patriotism, love, and country.

  • Jan 01, 2020

    Disgusting. Women are things, men are things. Honesty is crap. That is the message of this film. Supposedly anti-war, but actually anti-logic.

    Disgusting. Women are things, men are things. Honesty is crap. That is the message of this film. Supposedly anti-war, but actually anti-logic.

  • Jun 09, 2019

    This movie is not so much about the relationship between Charlie and Emily -- it's more about the relationship between men and war -- and the farcical reasons and behavior associated with war. It reminded me of a combination of M*A*S*H, Catch-22 and Dr. Strangelove. It has a nice balance of dark humor, romance and the seriousness of war. I enjoyed it on many levels. An added bonus is watching Julie Andrews in a more realistic role that felt different than Mary Poppins or Sound of Music.

    This movie is not so much about the relationship between Charlie and Emily -- it's more about the relationship between men and war -- and the farcical reasons and behavior associated with war. It reminded me of a combination of M*A*S*H, Catch-22 and Dr. Strangelove. It has a nice balance of dark humor, romance and the seriousness of war. I enjoyed it on many levels. An added bonus is watching Julie Andrews in a more realistic role that felt different than Mary Poppins or Sound of Music.

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best comedy romance movie ever made!

    The best comedy romance movie ever made!

  • Dec 08, 2018

    I just find the descriptive blurb used for this film on the site's using the word's "somehow distasteful" to be just...wrong. It is an adult's film with an adult viewpoint. Is it distasteful in is clear-eyed view of f the hypocrisies we somehow, all of us, maintain and hold up, as we make our way in a world that we often have little control of except for our little corner in time and space, and sometimes not even that? It's a sharp film, shatply directed, sharply performed.

    I just find the descriptive blurb used for this film on the site's using the word's "somehow distasteful" to be just...wrong. It is an adult's film with an adult viewpoint. Is it distasteful in is clear-eyed view of f the hypocrisies we somehow, all of us, maintain and hold up, as we make our way in a world that we often have little control of except for our little corner in time and space, and sometimes not even that? It's a sharp film, shatply directed, sharply performed.

  • Jun 09, 2018

    An all-time great. Paddy Chayefsky at his best. Script based "loosely" on the novel of the same name.

    An all-time great. Paddy Chayefsky at his best. Script based "loosely" on the novel of the same name.

  • Sep 10, 2016

    "It's the VIRTUE of war that's the fraud, not war itself." A unique little lost gem about legacy, war and death. The way language and sexuality are utilized to portray seemingly modern ideas on the effects of warfare must've been fairly controversial at the time. However, the dialogue and performances from Andrews to Garner to Coburn pop off the screen in fully old-fashioned screwball fashion. "I want you to remember that the last time you ever saw me, I was unregenerately eating a Hershey bar."

    "It's the VIRTUE of war that's the fraud, not war itself." A unique little lost gem about legacy, war and death. The way language and sexuality are utilized to portray seemingly modern ideas on the effects of warfare must've been fairly controversial at the time. However, the dialogue and performances from Andrews to Garner to Coburn pop off the screen in fully old-fashioned screwball fashion. "I want you to remember that the last time you ever saw me, I was unregenerately eating a Hershey bar."

  • Aug 30, 2016

    Did not seem to know what kind of movie it wanted to be, romantic, comedy, drama, war flick?

    Did not seem to know what kind of movie it wanted to be, romantic, comedy, drama, war flick?

  • Aug 19, 2016

    4.5/5 This one of the most startlingly cynical films about war imaginable, more than I would have ever expected from 1964. But I shouldn't be surprised - there was far less mythmaking then. The country had millions of WW II veterans, who not only knew about war, but knew about the bullshit associated with war and military service. They made a bestseller out of this novel, and made this a hit movie. My dad was one of them, and he loved films that belittled the glories of war. This film could never be made today. A dramedy about a sailor who believes in the church of cowardice? Who blames war on ordinary people who insist on hero-worship, thus inspiring generation after generation to aspire to martyrdom? Absolutely unthinkable. Francois Truffaut allegedly claimed that there could never be a true anti-war film. This movie stands as a testament against that notion. There's a scene early on where Lt. Cmdr Madison (James Garner, in his favorite role) is having tea with his new girlfriend Emily (Julie Andrews) and her mother (Joyce Grenfell). It's brutal, and left my jaw hanging. When it starts, the mother is still delusional, believing her husband, son and son-in-law are still alive, when they've all been killed by the war in some fashion. By the end, Garner has destroyed her protective self-deception with spectacular speech making, as only the brilliant Paddy Chayefsky could have written. A mere portion: "I don't trust people who make bitter reflections about war, Mrs. Barham. It's always the general with the bloodiest records who are the first to shout what a hell it is. It's always the war widows who lead the Memorial Day parades...We shall never end wars, Mrs. Barham, by blaming it on the ministers and generals, or warmongering imperialists, or all the other banal bogeys. It's the rest of us who build statues to those generals and name boulevards after those ministers. The rest of us who make heroes of our dead and shrines of our battlefields. We wear our widow's weeds like nuns, Mrs. Barham, and perpetuate war by exalting its sacrifices." Julie Andrews eventually adopts much of his attitude, and later in the film there is this exchange: Mrs. Barham: ...They're going to put up a monument on his grave. Emily Barham: What on earth for? All he did was die. Dear me, we shall be celebrating cancer and automobile smash-ups next. Lt. Cmdr. 'Bus' Cummings: [fervently] He didn't just die, Emily. He sacrificed his life. Mrs. Barham: That was very pagan of him. Lt. Cmdr. 'Bus' Cummings: He was the first American to die on Omaha Beach. Emily Barham: Was there a contest? Try to present that kind of dialogue today in a movie. Not happening, even though WW II was a far more righteous fight than any conflict since then. If we don't stop glorifying military service after thousands of veteran suicides, we never will. But don't forget to stand and applaud during the Memorial Day parade when the veterans march by, in between the Shriner clowns and the local girl's dance ballet troupe. You'll put a smile on the face of whoever is planning the next war.

    4.5/5 This one of the most startlingly cynical films about war imaginable, more than I would have ever expected from 1964. But I shouldn't be surprised - there was far less mythmaking then. The country had millions of WW II veterans, who not only knew about war, but knew about the bullshit associated with war and military service. They made a bestseller out of this novel, and made this a hit movie. My dad was one of them, and he loved films that belittled the glories of war. This film could never be made today. A dramedy about a sailor who believes in the church of cowardice? Who blames war on ordinary people who insist on hero-worship, thus inspiring generation after generation to aspire to martyrdom? Absolutely unthinkable. Francois Truffaut allegedly claimed that there could never be a true anti-war film. This movie stands as a testament against that notion. There's a scene early on where Lt. Cmdr Madison (James Garner, in his favorite role) is having tea with his new girlfriend Emily (Julie Andrews) and her mother (Joyce Grenfell). It's brutal, and left my jaw hanging. When it starts, the mother is still delusional, believing her husband, son and son-in-law are still alive, when they've all been killed by the war in some fashion. By the end, Garner has destroyed her protective self-deception with spectacular speech making, as only the brilliant Paddy Chayefsky could have written. A mere portion: "I don't trust people who make bitter reflections about war, Mrs. Barham. It's always the general with the bloodiest records who are the first to shout what a hell it is. It's always the war widows who lead the Memorial Day parades...We shall never end wars, Mrs. Barham, by blaming it on the ministers and generals, or warmongering imperialists, or all the other banal bogeys. It's the rest of us who build statues to those generals and name boulevards after those ministers. The rest of us who make heroes of our dead and shrines of our battlefields. We wear our widow's weeds like nuns, Mrs. Barham, and perpetuate war by exalting its sacrifices." Julie Andrews eventually adopts much of his attitude, and later in the film there is this exchange: Mrs. Barham: ...They're going to put up a monument on his grave. Emily Barham: What on earth for? All he did was die. Dear me, we shall be celebrating cancer and automobile smash-ups next. Lt. Cmdr. 'Bus' Cummings: [fervently] He didn't just die, Emily. He sacrificed his life. Mrs. Barham: That was very pagan of him. Lt. Cmdr. 'Bus' Cummings: He was the first American to die on Omaha Beach. Emily Barham: Was there a contest? Try to present that kind of dialogue today in a movie. Not happening, even though WW II was a far more righteous fight than any conflict since then. If we don't stop glorifying military service after thousands of veteran suicides, we never will. But don't forget to stand and applaud during the Memorial Day parade when the veterans march by, in between the Shriner clowns and the local girl's dance ballet troupe. You'll put a smile on the face of whoever is planning the next war.

  • Mar 04, 2016

    Wonderful movie with an incredible cast and unbelievable screenplay

    Wonderful movie with an incredible cast and unbelievable screenplay