Reviews

  • 8h ago

    It's difficult to capture moments in history when we don't truly know what they were like, but this movie gets as close as anyone can get. Visually captivating, and keeps you on a knife's edge the whole time, this is a very well made film.

    It's difficult to capture moments in history when we don't truly know what they were like, but this movie gets as close as anyone can get. Visually captivating, and keeps you on a knife's edge the whole time, this is a very well made film.

  • 2d ago

    This remains a fantastic cinematic event, deeply sympathetic yet exotic, mesmerizing, immersive and entertaining...standing strong to repeated viewings. i've yet to read a ceitique r dismissal of this film that doesn't diminish the one doing so. a longstanding must-see, and perhaps Gibson's best film.

    This remains a fantastic cinematic event, deeply sympathetic yet exotic, mesmerizing, immersive and entertaining...standing strong to repeated viewings. i've yet to read a ceitique r dismissal of this film that doesn't diminish the one doing so. a longstanding must-see, and perhaps Gibson's best film.

  • 5d ago

    A visual masterclass. Amazing cinematography, costume design, and set design. Great storytelling with few words needed.

    A visual masterclass. Amazing cinematography, costume design, and set design. Great storytelling with few words needed.

  • Nov 14, 2021

    Written, produced and directed by Mel Gibson, this film is about a young Mayan man who lives through the sacking of his village by slavers from a rival tribe. Make sure you have subtitles on as the language spoken in this movie is a modern interpretation of the ancient Mayan language. This movie has a very cruel undertone throughout. Not only through the depiction of human sacrifice, but also the bullying of a fellow hunter at the beginning. Kudos to the casting of native peoples for a movie about native peoples. I felt the climax of the movie was a bit of a let down as the plot seemed interrupted. The final act was an R rated jungle version of Home Alone that I felt could have been better set up earlier in the movie. Personally, not my kind of movie but I can see how it would have an audience that appreciated it.

    Written, produced and directed by Mel Gibson, this film is about a young Mayan man who lives through the sacking of his village by slavers from a rival tribe. Make sure you have subtitles on as the language spoken in this movie is a modern interpretation of the ancient Mayan language. This movie has a very cruel undertone throughout. Not only through the depiction of human sacrifice, but also the bullying of a fellow hunter at the beginning. Kudos to the casting of native peoples for a movie about native peoples. I felt the climax of the movie was a bit of a let down as the plot seemed interrupted. The final act was an R rated jungle version of Home Alone that I felt could have been better set up earlier in the movie. Personally, not my kind of movie but I can see how it would have an audience that appreciated it.

  • Sep 20, 2021

    I think this th first time I was hooked on a movie from start to finish, without knowing what is going on ... the movie has insane rewatchability power, you miss so much the first time you see it.. Amazing movie

    I think this th first time I was hooked on a movie from start to finish, without knowing what is going on ... the movie has insane rewatchability power, you miss so much the first time you see it.. Amazing movie

  • Aug 19, 2021

    Mel Gibson has said some pretty foolish things in the last decade, and that's a pretty kind way of putting it. However, his film making and film choices (Dragged Across Concrete [2018]) have most assuredly not been. Sure, he entertained us all with the nonsense that was Braveheart (1995) somehow fooling the Academy into thinking it was highbrow historical fact and sweeping up at the Oscars. Fair play. He appeared to do the same thing again with Hacksaw Ridge (2016) taking some laughable exploitation violence and applying it to a supposedly serious war movie, then throwing Vince Vaughan into the mix. If Hacksaw Ridge was taken tongue in cheek, it might work, to an extent, but for it to be up for so many Oscars was insulting. Gibson's best films as director, hands down, are The Passion Of The Christ (2004), and this, Apocalypto. Gibson's take on the last week of Jesus' life is shockingly violent, but it is not, as people like to label it, exploitational. It's an easy trap to fall into considering Gibson's traits, and if you're not overfamiliar with the week Gibson focuses on, fall into it you might. The attention to detail from Gibson, down to choosing to stick to the original Aramaic language for the film is hugely commendable, and despite the totally out of place slow-mo shots, The Passion Of The Christ is a piece of work- in every respect. Apocalypto sees Gibson continuing his attention to detail in subject matter, focusing on a Mayan community in the jungle of Yucatan, Mexico, in around 1502 when the Mayan kingdom was at the height of its power, but also having to deal with the crumbling of its foundations. Gibson's tale is well told, realistically violent, and once again the only thing that feels out of place is the same slow-mo shots that very slightly hampered The Passion Of The Christ. Gibson has learnt lessons from Braveheart, and proves that he really is a director to be reckoned with when he is this focused. The problem is, so far, for every Apocalypto, we have a Hacksaw Ridge forced upon us. A bit like Gibson's outbursts in the public eye, he should think about what he's saying, because when he does, we reap the benefits.

    Mel Gibson has said some pretty foolish things in the last decade, and that's a pretty kind way of putting it. However, his film making and film choices (Dragged Across Concrete [2018]) have most assuredly not been. Sure, he entertained us all with the nonsense that was Braveheart (1995) somehow fooling the Academy into thinking it was highbrow historical fact and sweeping up at the Oscars. Fair play. He appeared to do the same thing again with Hacksaw Ridge (2016) taking some laughable exploitation violence and applying it to a supposedly serious war movie, then throwing Vince Vaughan into the mix. If Hacksaw Ridge was taken tongue in cheek, it might work, to an extent, but for it to be up for so many Oscars was insulting. Gibson's best films as director, hands down, are The Passion Of The Christ (2004), and this, Apocalypto. Gibson's take on the last week of Jesus' life is shockingly violent, but it is not, as people like to label it, exploitational. It's an easy trap to fall into considering Gibson's traits, and if you're not overfamiliar with the week Gibson focuses on, fall into it you might. The attention to detail from Gibson, down to choosing to stick to the original Aramaic language for the film is hugely commendable, and despite the totally out of place slow-mo shots, The Passion Of The Christ is a piece of work- in every respect. Apocalypto sees Gibson continuing his attention to detail in subject matter, focusing on a Mayan community in the jungle of Yucatan, Mexico, in around 1502 when the Mayan kingdom was at the height of its power, but also having to deal with the crumbling of its foundations. Gibson's tale is well told, realistically violent, and once again the only thing that feels out of place is the same slow-mo shots that very slightly hampered The Passion Of The Christ. Gibson has learnt lessons from Braveheart, and proves that he really is a director to be reckoned with when he is this focused. The problem is, so far, for every Apocalypto, we have a Hacksaw Ridge forced upon us. A bit like Gibson's outbursts in the public eye, he should think about what he's saying, because when he does, we reap the benefits.

  • Jul 29, 2021

    It's savage, bloody, uncivilized, genocide, sins, cruel-reality which still exist today in different forms. Warrning, excessive violent not for teens. Nonetherless, Mel's work of masterpiece. It's good but not little oscar, perhaps it didn't aim for that too.

    It's savage, bloody, uncivilized, genocide, sins, cruel-reality which still exist today in different forms. Warrning, excessive violent not for teens. Nonetherless, Mel's work of masterpiece. It's good but not little oscar, perhaps it didn't aim for that too.

  • Jul 27, 2021

    One of the most visceral movies you will ever seen. This is a great story, a timeless tale, brilliantly filmed. I wish there were more movies like this made today.

    One of the most visceral movies you will ever seen. This is a great story, a timeless tale, brilliantly filmed. I wish there were more movies like this made today.

  • Jul 23, 2021

    One of the best movies of the 21st century.

    One of the best movies of the 21st century.

  • Jul 17, 2021

    If you were a child when it came out, see it now before some activist group gets it cancelled. It's a prime example of the kind of excellent balls to the wall film that because of the easily offended and the politically vindictive, cannot be made today. This is Gibsons best film. Unfortunately, it flopped because he was going through his highly publicized troubles. It's indeed a morality tale about the self destructive nature of cultural decadence. What's more, it's also Gibson's screed against paganism as so brilliantly underlined by the ending.

    If you were a child when it came out, see it now before some activist group gets it cancelled. It's a prime example of the kind of excellent balls to the wall film that because of the easily offended and the politically vindictive, cannot be made today. This is Gibsons best film. Unfortunately, it flopped because he was going through his highly publicized troubles. It's indeed a morality tale about the self destructive nature of cultural decadence. What's more, it's also Gibson's screed against paganism as so brilliantly underlined by the ending.