Blackboard Jungle Reviews

  • Feb 20, 2019

    Heavy-handed and cliched, but still effective. Glenn Ford stars as an idealistic young teacher who lands a job at a rough-and-tumble inner-city high school, only to discover that the students there have no more interest in learning than most of the teachers have in educating them. Its over-the-top, 50s-era view of juvenile delinquency does the film no favors, but the crisp dialogue, smooth direction and fine, low-key performances more than make up for it. With an utterly believable Sidney Poitier and a dangerous and dour-faced Vic Morrow--both at the start of their careers--as two of the chief agitators, a young Anne Francis as Ford's worried wife, and even a pre-"Man of La Mancha" Richard Kiley as the milquetoast teacher who is eventually forced to resign. (And if you look closely, you may even spot Jamie Farr, who went on to star as Corporal Klinger on "M.A.S.H.") Written and directed in gorgeous black-and-white by Richard Brooks. Based on the book by Evan Hunter. A classic.

    Heavy-handed and cliched, but still effective. Glenn Ford stars as an idealistic young teacher who lands a job at a rough-and-tumble inner-city high school, only to discover that the students there have no more interest in learning than most of the teachers have in educating them. Its over-the-top, 50s-era view of juvenile delinquency does the film no favors, but the crisp dialogue, smooth direction and fine, low-key performances more than make up for it. With an utterly believable Sidney Poitier and a dangerous and dour-faced Vic Morrow--both at the start of their careers--as two of the chief agitators, a young Anne Francis as Ford's worried wife, and even a pre-"Man of La Mancha" Richard Kiley as the milquetoast teacher who is eventually forced to resign. (And if you look closely, you may even spot Jamie Farr, who went on to star as Corporal Klinger on "M.A.S.H.") Written and directed in gorgeous black-and-white by Richard Brooks. Based on the book by Evan Hunter. A classic.

  • May 05, 2018

    Unlike most of the other school reform movies that I've watched, this movie made me so mad I wanted to murder the Vic Morrow character. There are a number of things that make me think that a violent solution is the answer, and his character committed a number of those actions. All that is going to happen to him is he is either going to be sent to another school where he will hurt someone else, or he will foul up the streets with his scumminess. The sexist ways that the women act and are acted upon is revolting, but shows a lot of the issues that the fifties were having with gender rights and sexism within men and women of the time. I liked the race statements that we shouldn't call each other racial slurs even within our own groups because it can not be a universal maxim and is therefore immoral. The chat between the teacher and Miller is also true, that you can't use the excuse of your race to not try and make something of yourself. Sidney Poitier is absolutely fantastic as usual, and this movie has introduced me to Glenn Ford, who now I want to see more of. This is an interesting and emotionally engaging movie, but I think a lot of the solutions should have been addressed in the beginning of the class rather than letting them fester and get out of control, including Ms. Hammond's advances. The cinematography was great, and it was amazing to me to hear a popular song used for the opening credits in a black and white movie, really cool.

    Unlike most of the other school reform movies that I've watched, this movie made me so mad I wanted to murder the Vic Morrow character. There are a number of things that make me think that a violent solution is the answer, and his character committed a number of those actions. All that is going to happen to him is he is either going to be sent to another school where he will hurt someone else, or he will foul up the streets with his scumminess. The sexist ways that the women act and are acted upon is revolting, but shows a lot of the issues that the fifties were having with gender rights and sexism within men and women of the time. I liked the race statements that we shouldn't call each other racial slurs even within our own groups because it can not be a universal maxim and is therefore immoral. The chat between the teacher and Miller is also true, that you can't use the excuse of your race to not try and make something of yourself. Sidney Poitier is absolutely fantastic as usual, and this movie has introduced me to Glenn Ford, who now I want to see more of. This is an interesting and emotionally engaging movie, but I think a lot of the solutions should have been addressed in the beginning of the class rather than letting them fester and get out of control, including Ms. Hammond's advances. The cinematography was great, and it was amazing to me to hear a popular song used for the opening credits in a black and white movie, really cool.

  • Jun 24, 2017

    Gritty inner city school story. Of course, Glenn Ford is successful in getting through to the kids. Also Vic Morrow, Sidney Poitier.

    Gritty inner city school story. Of course, Glenn Ford is successful in getting through to the kids. Also Vic Morrow, Sidney Poitier.

  • Apr 06, 2017

    Ford and Poitier are good, but the story is so dated. The dialog is silly. One of the silliest movies I've seen that needed more realism. Rebel without a Cause is a lot better, so is To Sir With Love.

    Ford and Poitier are good, but the story is so dated. The dialog is silly. One of the silliest movies I've seen that needed more realism. Rebel without a Cause is a lot better, so is To Sir With Love.

  • Feb 06, 2017

    Desperdiça tempo precioso com propaganda sobre respeitar professores, apesar de entregar bem sua mensagem no restante do filme (o que só mostra o quão inútil é a propaganda). Se tem problemas no primeiro e segundo ato, o último é ótimo, com um clímax muito acima da média

    Desperdiça tempo precioso com propaganda sobre respeitar professores, apesar de entregar bem sua mensagem no restante do filme (o que só mostra o quão inútil é a propaganda). Se tem problemas no primeiro e segundo ato, o último é ótimo, com um clímax muito acima da média

  • Jan 26, 2017

    I found the entire message of the film to be relevant to today, in regards to the education system. Glen Ford delivers a great performance as does Sidney Poritier. The only problem I have is that the film does overplay the 50'sness of it. You find that the over the top "bad boys" at school are kind of distracting. But over all a solid must see classic.

    I found the entire message of the film to be relevant to today, in regards to the education system. Glen Ford delivers a great performance as does Sidney Poritier. The only problem I have is that the film does overplay the 50'sness of it. You find that the over the top "bad boys" at school are kind of distracting. But over all a solid must see classic.

  • Feb 09, 2015

    The movie that created the "Teacher reforms delinquent kids" genre, launched the career of Sidney Poitier and introduced many people to rock 'n roll (thanks to Rock Around the Clock, by Bill Haley and the Comets, being in the soundtrack). However, for all this, it is idealistic, heavy-handed and very frustrating. It just doesn't feel like the real world. The abuse the teachers suffer seems over-the-top, just for effect. Worse still, they just grin and bear it. eg A teacher gets assaulted by students and can identify them, yet doesn't identify them to the cops as he would rather "reform" them. Oh, please. They should all have gone to jail. (Plan B: a posse of teachers with baseball bats evens the score...). Has a decent ending, but that would be it.

    The movie that created the "Teacher reforms delinquent kids" genre, launched the career of Sidney Poitier and introduced many people to rock 'n roll (thanks to Rock Around the Clock, by Bill Haley and the Comets, being in the soundtrack). However, for all this, it is idealistic, heavy-handed and very frustrating. It just doesn't feel like the real world. The abuse the teachers suffer seems over-the-top, just for effect. Worse still, they just grin and bear it. eg A teacher gets assaulted by students and can identify them, yet doesn't identify them to the cops as he would rather "reform" them. Oh, please. They should all have gone to jail. (Plan B: a posse of teachers with baseball bats evens the score...). Has a decent ending, but that would be it.

  • Dec 17, 2014

    The seminal "teacher in a ghetto" story that launched the Rock and Roll Era marked the screen debuts to Sidney Pottier, Vic Morrow and Jamie Farr, Sixty years later, guns have taken the place of knives and the music is rap, but the message is more relevant than ever. Essential.

    The seminal "teacher in a ghetto" story that launched the Rock and Roll Era marked the screen debuts to Sidney Pottier, Vic Morrow and Jamie Farr, Sixty years later, guns have taken the place of knives and the music is rap, but the message is more relevant than ever. Essential.

  • Aug 05, 2013

    My Favorite Film Is 1941's Citizen Kane.

    My Favorite Film Is 1941's Citizen Kane.

  • Jul 22, 2013

    Very very dated and full of 1950's sentimentalities, but and interesting and honest for its time on inner city schools.

    Very very dated and full of 1950's sentimentalities, but and interesting and honest for its time on inner city schools.