Bonsái Reviews

  • Mar 23, 2015

    Your basic Wes Anderson/Noah Baumbach vibe only in set Chile.

    Your basic Wes Anderson/Noah Baumbach vibe only in set Chile.

  • Jun 10, 2013

    wow,that was sad...yet very entertaining.

    wow,that was sad...yet very entertaining.

  • Jun 08, 2013

    If Bret McKenzie and an angst-ridden Denise Huxtable had Chilean doppelgangers, they would be playing the lead roles of this film. Well-made adaptation (no easy feat) and engaging characters that welcome a closer look.

    If Bret McKenzie and an angst-ridden Denise Huxtable had Chilean doppelgangers, they would be playing the lead roles of this film. Well-made adaptation (no easy feat) and engaging characters that welcome a closer look.

  • Nov 03, 2012

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seYq7BRFoqY

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seYq7BRFoqY

  • Oct 14, 2012

    On the upside, the use of literary symbolism within the story is among the finest I've seen, but I'm not sure whether it was the sense of false modesty, the lack of the literary background (on my behalf), or the seemingly lethargic evolution of the story line that made feel feel as if something was missing for Bonsái to be an outstanding film. Not bothered by the decadent, almost emotionless acting depicted (feels like a great tool to convey the ingenuity of the characters), though it is unfortunate when it's the most (if not the only) interesting aspect the film has.

    On the upside, the use of literary symbolism within the story is among the finest I've seen, but I'm not sure whether it was the sense of false modesty, the lack of the literary background (on my behalf), or the seemingly lethargic evolution of the story line that made feel feel as if something was missing for Bonsái to be an outstanding film. Not bothered by the decadent, almost emotionless acting depicted (feels like a great tool to convey the ingenuity of the characters), though it is unfortunate when it's the most (if not the only) interesting aspect the film has.

  • Sep 28, 2012

    The movie makes you think of the future and the past, and realize that we are played by fate.. Nothing is permanent.

    The movie makes you think of the future and the past, and realize that we are played by fate.. Nothing is permanent.

  • Sep 03, 2012

    very slow movie but sumting different

    very slow movie but sumting different

  • Jul 23, 2012

    Ok if you like reading the entire dialog but too slow for my taste.

    Ok if you like reading the entire dialog but too slow for my taste.

  • Jun 19, 2012

    A fresh and funny comedy from Chile, beautifully shot

    A fresh and funny comedy from Chile, beautifully shot

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    May 14, 2012

    In "Bonsai," a group of university students spend the night together at a friend's house where they all pair off. That leaves Julio(Diego Noguera) looking for company which he finds with Emilia(Nathalia Galgani). Of the two, he is the first one to take off his trendy T-shirt, revealing the worst sunburn lines in history. After they become a couple, he also helps her move in with her friend Barbara(Gabriela Arancibia). (At some point in the future, Emilia will die and Julio will be alone.) Eight years later, Julio is working a series of odd jobs that includes word processing for Gazmuri(Hugo Medina), a noted author. Except he finds that somebody can do the job cheaper. That does not stop Julio from continuing with the job, concocting his own manuscript, while carrying on with his neighbor Blanca(Trinidad Gonzalez), an interpreter. Armed with a sardonic wit, "Bonsai" is a thoughtful movie about revisiting the past through creative writing, by posing some intriguing questions. Is it ever too late to reclaim what was lost? Or maybe there was no hope in the first place. For Julio, this line of thought arises when he is meeting someone new, as he also remembers his first introduction to the writing of Proust who had his own second thoughts.(Before a showing of the movie of "Time Regained," the speaker asked the audience if we had all read Proust, like in this movie. I hadn't) But with any difficult literature, maybe Julio is not experienced enough to comprehend it well at a time when he was taking a lot for granted. Remember, just because you are smart, does not mean you know everything.

    In "Bonsai," a group of university students spend the night together at a friend's house where they all pair off. That leaves Julio(Diego Noguera) looking for company which he finds with Emilia(Nathalia Galgani). Of the two, he is the first one to take off his trendy T-shirt, revealing the worst sunburn lines in history. After they become a couple, he also helps her move in with her friend Barbara(Gabriela Arancibia). (At some point in the future, Emilia will die and Julio will be alone.) Eight years later, Julio is working a series of odd jobs that includes word processing for Gazmuri(Hugo Medina), a noted author. Except he finds that somebody can do the job cheaper. That does not stop Julio from continuing with the job, concocting his own manuscript, while carrying on with his neighbor Blanca(Trinidad Gonzalez), an interpreter. Armed with a sardonic wit, "Bonsai" is a thoughtful movie about revisiting the past through creative writing, by posing some intriguing questions. Is it ever too late to reclaim what was lost? Or maybe there was no hope in the first place. For Julio, this line of thought arises when he is meeting someone new, as he also remembers his first introduction to the writing of Proust who had his own second thoughts.(Before a showing of the movie of "Time Regained," the speaker asked the audience if we had all read Proust, like in this movie. I hadn't) But with any difficult literature, maybe Julio is not experienced enough to comprehend it well at a time when he was taking a lot for granted. Remember, just because you are smart, does not mean you know everything.