Brother Bear Reviews

  • Apr 25, 2021

    The most underrated movie ever.

    The most underrated movie ever.

  • Mar 02, 2021

    'Brother Bear' is a charming animated film from the Mouse House, but the film lacks anything unique in terms of its plot and characters. The script is fairly basic for a Disney animated film, but the comedic lines and voice acting elevate the watch-ability of the film. It is a great family film for the kids or any diehard Disney fans.

    'Brother Bear' is a charming animated film from the Mouse House, but the film lacks anything unique in terms of its plot and characters. The script is fairly basic for a Disney animated film, but the comedic lines and voice acting elevate the watch-ability of the film. It is a great family film for the kids or any diehard Disney fans.

  • Feb 17, 2021

    There’s no denying that Brother Bear is a cute film, and I suspect it would work quite well for families with young kids if they can handle the subject of death. I was surprised that they made the magic of the story work, because it is so far-fetched and ridiculous, but it clicked quite nicely. I can’t say the plot was all that surprising or original. You could see where the story was going well before it got there, with one notable exception. The final decision of the main character was a shocker. I did not expect the movie to go in that direction, and I must admit that it struck me as a bit odd. There are some basic problems that they are glossing over which come with the way they ended things, but we are asked not to think about all that. There are a handful of songs shoved into Brother Bear, because I guess there is some Disney law that requires them. I found those clunky, and out of place most of the time. I can’t decide if it would be better or worse if the characters themselves were singing the songs instead of the lyrical songs being used as a soundtrack. Also, the added nonsense characters that are solely there for comedy purposes didn’t click with me. I can appreciate the attempt to bring Rick Moranis’ and Dave Thomas’ characters from Second City into the film world, but they didn’t exactly add much merely doing voiceover here. All that said, Brother Bear is a fun little film, and I think that it should work particularly well for young kids.

    There’s no denying that Brother Bear is a cute film, and I suspect it would work quite well for families with young kids if they can handle the subject of death. I was surprised that they made the magic of the story work, because it is so far-fetched and ridiculous, but it clicked quite nicely. I can’t say the plot was all that surprising or original. You could see where the story was going well before it got there, with one notable exception. The final decision of the main character was a shocker. I did not expect the movie to go in that direction, and I must admit that it struck me as a bit odd. There are some basic problems that they are glossing over which come with the way they ended things, but we are asked not to think about all that. There are a handful of songs shoved into Brother Bear, because I guess there is some Disney law that requires them. I found those clunky, and out of place most of the time. I can’t decide if it would be better or worse if the characters themselves were singing the songs instead of the lyrical songs being used as a soundtrack. Also, the added nonsense characters that are solely there for comedy purposes didn’t click with me. I can appreciate the attempt to bring Rick Moranis’ and Dave Thomas’ characters from Second City into the film world, but they didn’t exactly add much merely doing voiceover here. All that said, Brother Bear is a fun little film, and I think that it should work particularly well for young kids.

  • Feb 09, 2021

    I believe that Brother Bear is one of the best and most underrated animated kid's movies of my time and frankly it deserves far better than the rating it currently has, I hope Disney does more with this movie after the live action remake!!!!!

    I believe that Brother Bear is one of the best and most underrated animated kid's movies of my time and frankly it deserves far better than the rating it currently has, I hope Disney does more with this movie after the live action remake!!!!!

  • Jan 25, 2021

    Película que marco mi infancia, que consta de un historia muy conmovedora y original, aunado a eso, preside de un excelente trabajo en cuanto a la banda sonora, y buen trabajo de doblaje, "Un clásico de Disney".

    Película que marco mi infancia, que consta de un historia muy conmovedora y original, aunado a eso, preside de un excelente trabajo en cuanto a la banda sonora, y buen trabajo de doblaje, "Un clásico de Disney".

  • Jan 22, 2021

    Watched in middle school.

    Watched in middle school.

  • Jan 18, 2021

    Brother Bear is an extremely bipolar film that at times, creates emotionally impactful scenes centered around relatable and likable characters only to squander much of its own potential with a weak second act, inconsistent writing and some questionable direction decisions. Set in prehistoric Alaska, Brother Bear establishes a fairly unique atmosphere by drawing inspiration from Native Alaskan folklore and centering around an Inuit village populated by colorful and compelling characters. The movie dedicated several scenes, especially in the beginning, to establishing the culture and societal structure of the tribe. This is the greatest strength of the film as it does a fantastic job of immersing the viewer in a culture that is rarely explored by movies of this genre. It also does a great job of introducing the film's protagonist Kenai, voiced by Joquin Phoenix, and his two brothers Denahi and Sitka. Their personalities and relationships with one another are distinctly established in the opening scene of the movie and effectively sets the stage for the resulting story. Without spoiling the plot, I'll discuss only plot elements that were clearly laid out it in trailers and promotional material, the story focuses on the main character being transformed into a bear as a punishment for a particular transgression. While this plot is certainly not original, Brother Bear surprisingly makes the most out of what could have been a tired and cliched story structure by introducing enough unique elements to set it apart from other movies with similar story beats. Where the movie begins to diverge from its initial tone and strong characterization is in the second act. After the central characters and conflict are established, the movie abruptly becomes a sort of road trip movie until a solid finish to the film refocusses the meandering plot. While this idea is not conceptually terrible, in execution, it comes across as unnecessarily forced, predictable, and at odds with the more realistic and grounded tone set up in the beginning of the movie. This is exemplified mainly by the subpar writing of dialogue for the animal characters. While an attempt is made to explore the juxtaposition between the societies of the animals and the humans, this is severely undermined by dialogue laced with modern lingo, references, and over the top stereotypes. The voice acting is passable, never reaching greatness but not truly horrible either. There are some instances of pretty apparent under acting but this is caused more by weak writing in key scenes and poor direction than it is by laziness or incompetence by the voice actors. Perhaps the most questionable aspect of the movie is it's musical score by Phil Collins. The issue isn't really the songs themselves but more of the ham-fisted way they are crammed into scenes that would have been better served with instrumentals. There is one scene in particular where a dramatic and pivotal conversation between the main characters is completely hijacked by one such Phil Collins track. What should have been a heart rending and emotional exchange is essentially ruined as the conversation fades out only to be replaced by Phil Collin's vocals. One huge positive for the movie however is in its animation. It's classic 2-D animation style lends itself nicely to the setting as both the scenery and character models are very well done. While I admittedly went way more negative than I initially set out to when I started writing, I still feel that despite its issues, Brother Bear is a solid Disney flic that succeeds more than it misses. The biggest issue that I had with it is that it is a good movie that could have and should have been a GREAT movie. It had all the makings of an all-time classic Disney movie but squandered its potential and, in turn, falls into a category of a solid B- kid's movie. Some minor character alterations and script revisions could have gone a long way to improving what is an enjoyable but ultimately frustrating movie. Score: 3/5

    Brother Bear is an extremely bipolar film that at times, creates emotionally impactful scenes centered around relatable and likable characters only to squander much of its own potential with a weak second act, inconsistent writing and some questionable direction decisions. Set in prehistoric Alaska, Brother Bear establishes a fairly unique atmosphere by drawing inspiration from Native Alaskan folklore and centering around an Inuit village populated by colorful and compelling characters. The movie dedicated several scenes, especially in the beginning, to establishing the culture and societal structure of the tribe. This is the greatest strength of the film as it does a fantastic job of immersing the viewer in a culture that is rarely explored by movies of this genre. It also does a great job of introducing the film's protagonist Kenai, voiced by Joquin Phoenix, and his two brothers Denahi and Sitka. Their personalities and relationships with one another are distinctly established in the opening scene of the movie and effectively sets the stage for the resulting story. Without spoiling the plot, I'll discuss only plot elements that were clearly laid out it in trailers and promotional material, the story focuses on the main character being transformed into a bear as a punishment for a particular transgression. While this plot is certainly not original, Brother Bear surprisingly makes the most out of what could have been a tired and cliched story structure by introducing enough unique elements to set it apart from other movies with similar story beats. Where the movie begins to diverge from its initial tone and strong characterization is in the second act. After the central characters and conflict are established, the movie abruptly becomes a sort of road trip movie until a solid finish to the film refocusses the meandering plot. While this idea is not conceptually terrible, in execution, it comes across as unnecessarily forced, predictable, and at odds with the more realistic and grounded tone set up in the beginning of the movie. This is exemplified mainly by the subpar writing of dialogue for the animal characters. While an attempt is made to explore the juxtaposition between the societies of the animals and the humans, this is severely undermined by dialogue laced with modern lingo, references, and over the top stereotypes. The voice acting is passable, never reaching greatness but not truly horrible either. There are some instances of pretty apparent under acting but this is caused more by weak writing in key scenes and poor direction than it is by laziness or incompetence by the voice actors. Perhaps the most questionable aspect of the movie is it's musical score by Phil Collins. The issue isn't really the songs themselves but more of the ham-fisted way they are crammed into scenes that would have been better served with instrumentals. There is one scene in particular where a dramatic and pivotal conversation between the main characters is completely hijacked by one such Phil Collins track. What should have been a heart rending and emotional exchange is essentially ruined as the conversation fades out only to be replaced by Phil Collin's vocals. One huge positive for the movie however is in its animation. It's classic 2-D animation style lends itself nicely to the setting as both the scenery and character models are very well done. While I admittedly went way more negative than I initially set out to when I started writing, I still feel that despite its issues, Brother Bear is a solid Disney flic that succeeds more than it misses. The biggest issue that I had with it is that it is a good movie that could have and should have been a GREAT movie. It had all the makings of an all-time classic Disney movie but squandered its potential and, in turn, falls into a category of a solid B- kid's movie. Some minor character alterations and script revisions could have gone a long way to improving what is an enjoyable but ultimately frustrating movie. Score: 3/5

  • Dec 31, 2020

    Amazing film, great watch for all ages. Moving story should have a lot higher score.

    Amazing film, great watch for all ages. Moving story should have a lot higher score.

  • Dec 28, 2020

    Fun, emotional, and very serious realistic life decisions and lessons. This is a very underrated film that makes a great impact on sacrifice, friendship, family, and respect. Starting with the acting, Joaquin Phoenix does an incredible job voicing the main charcter Kenai. His character's pain, suffering, confusion, and happiness were all really impacted beautifully by Joaquin. Jeremy Suarez also did a wonderful job on voicing the lovable and charming little cub Koda. The graphics of the movie were nicely done for its time period, which had very nicely detailed backgrounds that were very colorful. The story is very interesting, for I am part Indian and this film impacted my family and I very strongly (in a great breathtaking way). Your tribe is your family, but your siblings are something much more than that where it is a bond that is undescribable. This movie shows just how realistic it is when a brother is given very few options on what to do when his siblings are in danger, and what a loss of one could realistic impact the others. The plot may be straightforward early on, but the adventure and story telling throughout is beautifully done and very impactful with its emotions. Deserves such greater praise and needs to be rated much higher. Hope you all enjoy it as much as I did!

    Fun, emotional, and very serious realistic life decisions and lessons. This is a very underrated film that makes a great impact on sacrifice, friendship, family, and respect. Starting with the acting, Joaquin Phoenix does an incredible job voicing the main charcter Kenai. His character's pain, suffering, confusion, and happiness were all really impacted beautifully by Joaquin. Jeremy Suarez also did a wonderful job on voicing the lovable and charming little cub Koda. The graphics of the movie were nicely done for its time period, which had very nicely detailed backgrounds that were very colorful. The story is very interesting, for I am part Indian and this film impacted my family and I very strongly (in a great breathtaking way). Your tribe is your family, but your siblings are something much more than that where it is a bond that is undescribable. This movie shows just how realistic it is when a brother is given very few options on what to do when his siblings are in danger, and what a loss of one could realistic impact the others. The plot may be straightforward early on, but the adventure and story telling throughout is beautifully done and very impactful with its emotions. Deserves such greater praise and needs to be rated much higher. Hope you all enjoy it as much as I did!

  • Nov 25, 2020

    It is really interesting Disney Film.

    It is really interesting Disney Film.