Consuming Spirits Reviews

  • Feb 25, 2017

    I give this a 86/B+.

    I give this a 86/B+.

  • Oct 08, 2015

    Consuming Spirits can't be described in a few short words because it is one of the most originally constructed movies I've seen in a while. Using different types of animation throughout, director Chris Sullivan is able to give off various atmospheres and allow his characters to gain some depth beyond their fragmented appearance.

    Consuming Spirits can't be described in a few short words because it is one of the most originally constructed movies I've seen in a while. Using different types of animation throughout, director Chris Sullivan is able to give off various atmospheres and allow his characters to gain some depth beyond their fragmented appearance.

  • Sep 23, 2013

    Amazingly creative and enthralling animation done in multiple styles and with a story that takes the whole film to unravel -- simply consuming. Definitely a worthwhile film to see for any film fan with a love of great animation or amazing stories.

    Amazingly creative and enthralling animation done in multiple styles and with a story that takes the whole film to unravel -- simply consuming. Definitely a worthwhile film to see for any film fan with a love of great animation or amazing stories.

  • May 04, 2013

    A film you've likely never heard of before and may never hear of again, "Consuming Spirits" is a labor of love (emphasis on the labor) many years in the making. An animated feature that famously took writer/director Chris Sullivan 15 years to complete, "Consuming Spirits" combines cut-out animation, traditional hand-drawn work and three-dimensional stop motion to create a visually mesmerizing fictional Midwestern town. The convoluted narrative relates the intertwined stories of a few of the denizens of this town, exploring topics such as alcohol consumption, familial devotion, extramarital affairs in a darkly comedic fashion that suits its haunting and often purposefully grotesque visuals. Some of the most memorable moments include a non-professionally approved amputation and a man gallivanting about disguised as a deer. "Consuming Spirits" could, and likely will, be considered a masterpiece by many. I think it's pulled down by its excessive length (the film clocks in at 130 minutes), but the storylines do segue together nicely at the end. On the whole, this is a meticulously crafted and admirably realized example of the storytelling capacities of traditional animation, even if the measured, hypnotic narration of protagonist Earl Gray (Robert Levy) does occasionally make your eyes droop. Read more: http://host.madison.com/daily-cardinal/entertainment/wisconsin-film-festival-recap/article_cb832ade-a8c5-11e2-ae5f-0019bb2963f4.html#ixzz2SMHjtBSD

    A film you've likely never heard of before and may never hear of again, "Consuming Spirits" is a labor of love (emphasis on the labor) many years in the making. An animated feature that famously took writer/director Chris Sullivan 15 years to complete, "Consuming Spirits" combines cut-out animation, traditional hand-drawn work and three-dimensional stop motion to create a visually mesmerizing fictional Midwestern town. The convoluted narrative relates the intertwined stories of a few of the denizens of this town, exploring topics such as alcohol consumption, familial devotion, extramarital affairs in a darkly comedic fashion that suits its haunting and often purposefully grotesque visuals. Some of the most memorable moments include a non-professionally approved amputation and a man gallivanting about disguised as a deer. "Consuming Spirits" could, and likely will, be considered a masterpiece by many. I think it's pulled down by its excessive length (the film clocks in at 130 minutes), but the storylines do segue together nicely at the end. On the whole, this is a meticulously crafted and admirably realized example of the storytelling capacities of traditional animation, even if the measured, hypnotic narration of protagonist Earl Gray (Robert Levy) does occasionally make your eyes droop. Read more: http://host.madison.com/daily-cardinal/entertainment/wisconsin-film-festival-recap/article_cb832ade-a8c5-11e2-ae5f-0019bb2963f4.html#ixzz2SMHjtBSD

  • Apr 11, 2013

    Although the film gave me nightmares and made me want to cry afterwards, it was beautifully and meticulously crafted. The film creates both a hilarious and depressing world as a metaphor for the life of an underclass, unprivileged town whose hopes and dreams amount to merely surviving and caring for one another. These basic needs and wants can resemble our own fear of death and losing the ones we love. The entire film is a tragic reminder that life and love are both delicate and fleeting.

    Although the film gave me nightmares and made me want to cry afterwards, it was beautifully and meticulously crafted. The film creates both a hilarious and depressing world as a metaphor for the life of an underclass, unprivileged town whose hopes and dreams amount to merely surviving and caring for one another. These basic needs and wants can resemble our own fear of death and losing the ones we love. The entire film is a tragic reminder that life and love are both delicate and fleeting.

  • Feb 23, 2013

    A haunting, grotesquely beautiful poem of a film meditating on loss, death, regret, corruption and decay. Funny, tragic, and poignant in all the right ways. A must-see.

    A haunting, grotesquely beautiful poem of a film meditating on loss, death, regret, corruption and decay. Funny, tragic, and poignant in all the right ways. A must-see.