Day for Night Reviews

  • Jul 16, 2020

    I wasn't interested in anything going on.

    I wasn't interested in anything going on.

  • Jun 20, 2020

    Truffaut's love letter to cinema is a funny and compelling adventure thorugh the very process of making a film.

    Truffaut's love letter to cinema is a funny and compelling adventure thorugh the very process of making a film.

  • Nov 08, 2018

    An interesting analysis of a film within a film. Really captures the whole cinematic experience

    An interesting analysis of a film within a film. Really captures the whole cinematic experience

  • May 21, 2018

    Movies that give you the behind-the-scenes look of how movies are made can be quite fascinating. It also must be a real challenge for the director because he has to direct and write his movie and the movie within that movie. Day for Night is François Truffaut’s attempt at doing that, and he even acts in the movie as the director. Just talking about it is kind of mind-bending, so I can’t imagine the amount of juggling that must have went on when making Day for Night. When the movie started by showing us the process of shooting an elaborate scene with lots of extras choreographed in order to make everything flow, I was on board. He captured some beautiful shots, and showed all the little things that go into making a crowd scene work. In fact every time that they focused in on the small details that have to be thought through when making a movie, I was fascinated. The less interesting parts for me were all the interpersonal relationships between the cast and crew. At one point a character has a rant about all the soap opera drama that is going on behind closed doors while this movie is being made and I couldn’t help agreeing with her. Perhaps this is a direct reflection of experiences Truffaut had while filming other movies, and he was trying to encapsulate the melodrama that actors can bring into the production of a picture. I think a little bit of this would have worked, because I do appreciate that these scenes made the story more personal, but a lot of the relationships made the characters look dumb and annoying. In particular, Jean-Pierre Léaud’s performance as Alphonse became increasingly insufferable as the film progressed. It’s clearly intentional, because the character is intended to be a bit of an airhead, but it’s so hard for me to watch (particularly when he drags other people down with him.) There was a lot to like in Day for Night, and I appreciated how many different aspects of film-making they showed. Most of the cast fit their roles nicely, even if some of the acting is a little over-the-top. Truffaut did some cool things with the camera, especially when he duplicated the exact shots that they were using in the movie within the movie. I wish there was a bit more direction or focus to the story, because it didn’t flow like a typical story. Many of the scenes could have been shifted around because they didn’t connect in any order, and I was disappointed that there were a few montages that skipped over some interesting scenes. It’s worth mentioning that most of this is probably on purpose, because making a movie doesn’t have the kind of flow that makes for a traditional story. They can often be shot out of order and thrown together a piece at a time. I did enjoy aspects of Day for Night, but there are other movies about making movies that I like more.

    Movies that give you the behind-the-scenes look of how movies are made can be quite fascinating. It also must be a real challenge for the director because he has to direct and write his movie and the movie within that movie. Day for Night is François Truffaut’s attempt at doing that, and he even acts in the movie as the director. Just talking about it is kind of mind-bending, so I can’t imagine the amount of juggling that must have went on when making Day for Night. When the movie started by showing us the process of shooting an elaborate scene with lots of extras choreographed in order to make everything flow, I was on board. He captured some beautiful shots, and showed all the little things that go into making a crowd scene work. In fact every time that they focused in on the small details that have to be thought through when making a movie, I was fascinated. The less interesting parts for me were all the interpersonal relationships between the cast and crew. At one point a character has a rant about all the soap opera drama that is going on behind closed doors while this movie is being made and I couldn’t help agreeing with her. Perhaps this is a direct reflection of experiences Truffaut had while filming other movies, and he was trying to encapsulate the melodrama that actors can bring into the production of a picture. I think a little bit of this would have worked, because I do appreciate that these scenes made the story more personal, but a lot of the relationships made the characters look dumb and annoying. In particular, Jean-Pierre Léaud’s performance as Alphonse became increasingly insufferable as the film progressed. It’s clearly intentional, because the character is intended to be a bit of an airhead, but it’s so hard for me to watch (particularly when he drags other people down with him.) There was a lot to like in Day for Night, and I appreciated how many different aspects of film-making they showed. Most of the cast fit their roles nicely, even if some of the acting is a little over-the-top. Truffaut did some cool things with the camera, especially when he duplicated the exact shots that they were using in the movie within the movie. I wish there was a bit more direction or focus to the story, because it didn’t flow like a typical story. Many of the scenes could have been shifted around because they didn’t connect in any order, and I was disappointed that there were a few montages that skipped over some interesting scenes. It’s worth mentioning that most of this is probably on purpose, because making a movie doesn’t have the kind of flow that makes for a traditional story. They can often be shot out of order and thrown together a piece at a time. I did enjoy aspects of Day for Night, but there are other movies about making movies that I like more.

  • Nov 03, 2017

    If you do not end Day for Night wanting to make a movie, you're not a cinephile. This film creates an environment that fits me like a glove: breezy and wonderful, that excites and seduces in a wonderful kind of way.

    If you do not end Day for Night wanting to make a movie, you're not a cinephile. This film creates an environment that fits me like a glove: breezy and wonderful, that excites and seduces in a wonderful kind of way.

  • Oct 26, 2017

    There are few films that adequately depict the lifestyle and philosophy of filmmaking by transposing it with a "realistic" narrative and Truffaut could not be replaced by anyone better to do such a fantastic job. Everything from the cuts to the frames are descriptive and involving.

    There are few films that adequately depict the lifestyle and philosophy of filmmaking by transposing it with a "realistic" narrative and Truffaut could not be replaced by anyone better to do such a fantastic job. Everything from the cuts to the frames are descriptive and involving.

  • Aug 25, 2017

    Day for Night has a couple of interesting scenes, but most of the film was one giant, boring telenovela with too many forgettable characters and an over-reliance on soapy elements and not enough story. It is a very overrated film that did not deserve its Oscar at all.

    Day for Night has a couple of interesting scenes, but most of the film was one giant, boring telenovela with too many forgettable characters and an over-reliance on soapy elements and not enough story. It is a very overrated film that did not deserve its Oscar at all.

  • Apr 20, 2017

    A movie about making a move, full of manic, non-stop happenings. It treats the busy lives of everyone in the cast and crew glibly but there is always something surprising and unpredictable happening. I love the cat who refuses to lap up the milk. It's like a feline metaphor for the way that everything that can go wrong does go wrong. The movie gets made in spite of and not because of all the efforts of those tasked with making it.

    A movie about making a move, full of manic, non-stop happenings. It treats the busy lives of everyone in the cast and crew glibly but there is always something surprising and unpredictable happening. I love the cat who refuses to lap up the milk. It's like a feline metaphor for the way that everything that can go wrong does go wrong. The movie gets made in spite of and not because of all the efforts of those tasked with making it.

  • Jan 30, 2017

    A more supreme version of Contempt, this does what films about film production should show and tell about: film production!

    A more supreme version of Contempt, this does what films about film production should show and tell about: film production!

  • Sep 25, 2016

    4.5/5 With frantic energy Truffaut brings us behind the scenes of all the drama, chaos and hilarity involved in filmmaking - where the cast and crew can be just as absurd as the characters on screen.

    4.5/5 With frantic energy Truffaut brings us behind the scenes of all the drama, chaos and hilarity involved in filmmaking - where the cast and crew can be just as absurd as the characters on screen.