Frances Ha Reviews

  • Nov 12, 2019

    So poignant, so masterfully written, so brilliantly performed. I won't forget about this film.

    So poignant, so masterfully written, so brilliantly performed. I won't forget about this film.

  • Sep 29, 2019

    I can see why this "Dairy of a Wimpy Millenial" can be appealing to many people

    I can see why this "Dairy of a Wimpy Millenial" can be appealing to many people

  • Sep 22, 2019

    "Frances Ha" is a coming-of-age portrait with all the unique compositions and a great mumblecore movie. This movie shows a chapter-by-chapter snippet about the real life of young metropolitan cities. It's about reflection, how we looking for an identity, conflicts about life's ambitions to friendship, and romance. It's easy to relate to this movie. The movie is honest, realistic, smooth dialogues, and comedy. Performance by the actors especially Greta Gerwig is loveable. It's touching, funny, and melancholy.

    "Frances Ha" is a coming-of-age portrait with all the unique compositions and a great mumblecore movie. This movie shows a chapter-by-chapter snippet about the real life of young metropolitan cities. It's about reflection, how we looking for an identity, conflicts about life's ambitions to friendship, and romance. It's easy to relate to this movie. The movie is honest, realistic, smooth dialogues, and comedy. Performance by the actors especially Greta Gerwig is loveable. It's touching, funny, and melancholy.

  • Sep 06, 2019

    A refreshingly raw character study, and portrayal of life in the industry, Frances Ha touches all the highs and lows of ambition and aspiration. All the while exploring the phenomena of the human relationship, and the understated power that they posess -- this, of course, is all held together by an infectiously captivating Greta Gerwig.

    A refreshingly raw character study, and portrayal of life in the industry, Frances Ha touches all the highs and lows of ambition and aspiration. All the while exploring the phenomena of the human relationship, and the understated power that they posess -- this, of course, is all held together by an infectiously captivating Greta Gerwig.

  • Jun 29, 2019

    What a sweet little gem of a movie. Maybe it's mumblecore, maybe it's not (if mumblecore ever was a thing) but who cares? Greta Gerwig is simply fantastic in this film, as is the entire cast. A charming way to while away 86 minutes.

    What a sweet little gem of a movie. Maybe it's mumblecore, maybe it's not (if mumblecore ever was a thing) but who cares? Greta Gerwig is simply fantastic in this film, as is the entire cast. A charming way to while away 86 minutes.

  • May 05, 2019

    It is a bittersweet portrait of the generational parenthesis between generation X and millennials. Frances embodies the diaspora of educated middle class young people raised to inhabit a society that no longer exists but being unable to truly belong to this modernity.

    It is a bittersweet portrait of the generational parenthesis between generation X and millennials. Frances embodies the diaspora of educated middle class young people raised to inhabit a society that no longer exists but being unable to truly belong to this modernity.

  • Apr 30, 2019

    Now that Greta Gerwig is best known as the creative force behind Lady Bird (2017) it's wonderful to see that she is equally talented as a comedic presence in front of the camera. This is one of Baumbach's best known films and features the first of appearance of the always wonderful Adam Driver. It's Gerwig's luminosity that makes or breaks the picture and she gives it her all in a performance reminiscent of Diane Keaton in Annie Hall (1977). Any Baumbach movie has clear Woody Allen influences but here Manhattan (1979) holds a specter over every stylistic choice in the film from the black and white cinematography to the quirky, unlucky in love heroine. There is none of the creepiness of that film present though as the main character is not dating a teenage boy and horribly manipulating him. Frances Halladay, Greta Gerwig, is a flighty dancer in her mid-twenties with very few ambitions in life other than preserving her friendship with Sophie, Mickey Summer, whom she shares a very close relationship with. When Sophie moves to a trendier neighborhood with her boyfriend, Frances is forced to move out of their shared apartment because the rent is too high. As she moves around to various apartments she meets Benji, Michael Zegen, a potential love interest and Lev, Adam Driver, a wealthy young sculptor. Her relationship with Sophie falls apart as Frances fails to mature whilst Mickey develops closer bonds with others. As her life falls apart around her Frances maintains a mostly upbeat, friendly demeanor and approach to life but will it all become too much? Gerwig's performance is the central attraction in the film, as stated in the opening paragraph, as she's completely watchable whilst also being slightly insecure and ditzy. The difference between herself and Keaton is that when her character needs to have dramatic moments she moves beyond the entertaining little tics that her character has and we feel genuinely morose along with her, no matter how small her problem. Her fear and excitement as she questions a dance instructor about taking extra classes is palpable and relatable even as Frances lives a life more glamorous than most people could ever hope for. Her romantic scenes with Benji are also largely carried by Gerwig as she appears confident in her own desirability whilst not being entirely certain of Benji's intentions. She's so damn good. The meandering plotline and lack of real resolution, we do understand that Frances has in some ways grown up, did not bother me because the characters were interesting enough and the dialogue so specific that I was completely engaged for the majority of the running time. I didn't go in expecting a normal â~plot' from a Noah Baumbach film and I think that the fact that I didn't expect this helped me enjoy the film more than say, my father who is a fan of superhero films, ick. Moments like that in which Frances exhibits â~immature' behavior whilst out to dinner with Sophie and her boyfriend and we witness Sophie's consternation are heartbreaking and therefore we have more reason to understand her change than we do in Captain America: The First Avenger. I got what I wanted out of the film, good performances, well-observed moments and great writing but if you go in expecting more than that you may be disappointed, if you're expecting Step Up (2006) this is not your movie. The cinematography in this film deserves some comment as although I don't think it's capturing of New York will ever be quite as iconic as Manhattan, because come on it's Manhattan. Even a shot of Frances and Sophie peeing out of their windows is rather beautifully captured as the dark shadows of the windows spread across their faces and the stillness of their motions is similar to the Isaac and Mary argument in Manhattan. When Frances returns to her hometown of Sacramento the film looks more mundane but I suppose that fits the story's intentions why leave big, glamorous New York City and return to the much less exciting city of your youth. If you love Noah Baumbach you will obviously have seen this film but if you are not familiar with him this would be a good introduction point and you'll fall in love with Gerwig as you're along for a lovely little ride.

    Now that Greta Gerwig is best known as the creative force behind Lady Bird (2017) it's wonderful to see that she is equally talented as a comedic presence in front of the camera. This is one of Baumbach's best known films and features the first of appearance of the always wonderful Adam Driver. It's Gerwig's luminosity that makes or breaks the picture and she gives it her all in a performance reminiscent of Diane Keaton in Annie Hall (1977). Any Baumbach movie has clear Woody Allen influences but here Manhattan (1979) holds a specter over every stylistic choice in the film from the black and white cinematography to the quirky, unlucky in love heroine. There is none of the creepiness of that film present though as the main character is not dating a teenage boy and horribly manipulating him. Frances Halladay, Greta Gerwig, is a flighty dancer in her mid-twenties with very few ambitions in life other than preserving her friendship with Sophie, Mickey Summer, whom she shares a very close relationship with. When Sophie moves to a trendier neighborhood with her boyfriend, Frances is forced to move out of their shared apartment because the rent is too high. As she moves around to various apartments she meets Benji, Michael Zegen, a potential love interest and Lev, Adam Driver, a wealthy young sculptor. Her relationship with Sophie falls apart as Frances fails to mature whilst Mickey develops closer bonds with others. As her life falls apart around her Frances maintains a mostly upbeat, friendly demeanor and approach to life but will it all become too much? Gerwig's performance is the central attraction in the film, as stated in the opening paragraph, as she's completely watchable whilst also being slightly insecure and ditzy. The difference between herself and Keaton is that when her character needs to have dramatic moments she moves beyond the entertaining little tics that her character has and we feel genuinely morose along with her, no matter how small her problem. Her fear and excitement as she questions a dance instructor about taking extra classes is palpable and relatable even as Frances lives a life more glamorous than most people could ever hope for. Her romantic scenes with Benji are also largely carried by Gerwig as she appears confident in her own desirability whilst not being entirely certain of Benji's intentions. She's so damn good. The meandering plotline and lack of real resolution, we do understand that Frances has in some ways grown up, did not bother me because the characters were interesting enough and the dialogue so specific that I was completely engaged for the majority of the running time. I didn't go in expecting a normal â~plot' from a Noah Baumbach film and I think that the fact that I didn't expect this helped me enjoy the film more than say, my father who is a fan of superhero films, ick. Moments like that in which Frances exhibits â~immature' behavior whilst out to dinner with Sophie and her boyfriend and we witness Sophie's consternation are heartbreaking and therefore we have more reason to understand her change than we do in Captain America: The First Avenger. I got what I wanted out of the film, good performances, well-observed moments and great writing but if you go in expecting more than that you may be disappointed, if you're expecting Step Up (2006) this is not your movie. The cinematography in this film deserves some comment as although I don't think it's capturing of New York will ever be quite as iconic as Manhattan, because come on it's Manhattan. Even a shot of Frances and Sophie peeing out of their windows is rather beautifully captured as the dark shadows of the windows spread across their faces and the stillness of their motions is similar to the Isaac and Mary argument in Manhattan. When Frances returns to her hometown of Sacramento the film looks more mundane but I suppose that fits the story's intentions why leave big, glamorous New York City and return to the much less exciting city of your youth. If you love Noah Baumbach you will obviously have seen this film but if you are not familiar with him this would be a good introduction point and you'll fall in love with Gerwig as you're along for a lovely little ride.

  • Mar 09, 2019

    The quirkiness needs some getting-used-to, but Gerwig is equally hilarious and solemn when she needs to be. In all, the film expresses a much needed "F**k you" to the arrogant and stiff attitudes of city-life.

    The quirkiness needs some getting-used-to, but Gerwig is equally hilarious and solemn when she needs to be. In all, the film expresses a much needed "F**k you" to the arrogant and stiff attitudes of city-life.

  • Feb 05, 2019

    A film that follows young adults who are still trying to find their identity in the complexity of relationships. Sometimes to dialogue driven, their performances help balance it out

    A film that follows young adults who are still trying to find their identity in the complexity of relationships. Sometimes to dialogue driven, their performances help balance it out

  • Feb 03, 2019

    maybe I am too old, but I guess this felt like a new generation's "Reality Bites".

    maybe I am too old, but I guess this felt like a new generation's "Reality Bites".