Gilda Reviews

  • Jun 25, 2020

    I enjoyed the cast on this one, but, not so much the story

    I enjoyed the cast on this one, but, not so much the story

  • May 17, 2020

    The plot of this film is quite intriguing, and could be described as a hate triangle between characters who find hate even more passionate and exciting than love. Some people see this as Rita Hayworth's most iconic film, so it's interesting to see how she was cast against type. Her previous characters, especially in the musicals, are a long way off from the sultry femme fatale (although, I think I would dispute that classification). I was troubled by the ending, where Gilda ends up with Johnny. Young Glenn Ford is very handsome, but I think modern audiences would recognize him as an abuser. I found him quite distasteful as a character and wasn't convinced that they were in love at the end, especially after his vindictive treatment of her. I like the theory that this is a genuine love triangle, and there is a relationship between the two men. Once you begin to notice the subtext, and that Johnny's former lover (Gilda) has come between his present relationship, his behavior (and the rest of the film) begins to make a lot more sense.

    The plot of this film is quite intriguing, and could be described as a hate triangle between characters who find hate even more passionate and exciting than love. Some people see this as Rita Hayworth's most iconic film, so it's interesting to see how she was cast against type. Her previous characters, especially in the musicals, are a long way off from the sultry femme fatale (although, I think I would dispute that classification). I was troubled by the ending, where Gilda ends up with Johnny. Young Glenn Ford is very handsome, but I think modern audiences would recognize him as an abuser. I found him quite distasteful as a character and wasn't convinced that they were in love at the end, especially after his vindictive treatment of her. I like the theory that this is a genuine love triangle, and there is a relationship between the two men. Once you begin to notice the subtext, and that Johnny's former lover (Gilda) has come between his present relationship, his behavior (and the rest of the film) begins to make a lot more sense.

  • Apr 21, 2020

    Another overwritten, complex, and ultimately uninteresting noir, famous for being famous. I had zero involvement or care about anyone or anything. Hayworth was beautiful and talented, but there are other films showing this better. In the ‘Put the Blame on Mame’ number, she moves awkwardly, with hunched, immovable shoulders, and does one too many flip her hair shots. Rarely have I been so let down considering this films reputation.

    Another overwritten, complex, and ultimately uninteresting noir, famous for being famous. I had zero involvement or care about anyone or anything. Hayworth was beautiful and talented, but there are other films showing this better. In the ‘Put the Blame on Mame’ number, she moves awkwardly, with hunched, immovable shoulders, and does one too many flip her hair shots. Rarely have I been so let down considering this films reputation.

  • Jan 18, 2020

    Wow! A gem from the 1940s that has it all. It's a sexually charged movie with a great noir look and fine performances from Hayworth, Ford and Macready. It has an intricate screenplay in which each one of the multiple stories operates on a different level of superficiality / seriousness. One of those stories involves a perverse love affair. And Hayworth's performance is one of Hollywood's iconic portrayals of erotic power. The movie's ending is jarring and seems to have been designed by the censors who ruled at the time. That the censors intervened didn't surprise me. What was surprising is that they even allowed the first 9/10th of the film in the first place!

    Wow! A gem from the 1940s that has it all. It's a sexually charged movie with a great noir look and fine performances from Hayworth, Ford and Macready. It has an intricate screenplay in which each one of the multiple stories operates on a different level of superficiality / seriousness. One of those stories involves a perverse love affair. And Hayworth's performance is one of Hollywood's iconic portrayals of erotic power. The movie's ending is jarring and seems to have been designed by the censors who ruled at the time. That the censors intervened didn't surprise me. What was surprising is that they even allowed the first 9/10th of the film in the first place!

  • Jul 05, 2019

    Glenn Ford and Rita Hayworth sparkle. The movie is alive with energy and passion. One of the best films of Hollywood's Golden Years.

    Glenn Ford and Rita Hayworth sparkle. The movie is alive with energy and passion. One of the best films of Hollywood's Golden Years.

  • May 20, 2019

    Very good entertainment. Hayworth is superb.

    Very good entertainment. Hayworth is superb.

  • Jan 17, 2019

    I feel that this movie would end a different way if it were made today. For much of the film, it feels as if Gilda has her finger on the pulse of those who crave her, but as she succumbs to the toxicity of her relationship with Johnny (in what is presented as a happy ending for all parties), the towering strength of her character falls a bit flat. I chalk this up to the era, when "I really did love you all along" could feel like a happy ending for a woman in a relationship with a history of abuse and outright cruelty. The same ending in a film made today could succeed as a bitter reflection on the realities of the abuse cycle, but Gilda signs off with a jubilant flourish that just doesn't mesh with the modern mindset. However, the film is written and shot well, and, most importantly, Rita Hayworth as Gilda is bigger than the film itself, and it's worth watching Gilda just to watch Hayworth. Her simultaneous command of her femininity, her wit, her guile, and her fragility is outstanding, and the film suffers for every second she's off screen

    I feel that this movie would end a different way if it were made today. For much of the film, it feels as if Gilda has her finger on the pulse of those who crave her, but as she succumbs to the toxicity of her relationship with Johnny (in what is presented as a happy ending for all parties), the towering strength of her character falls a bit flat. I chalk this up to the era, when "I really did love you all along" could feel like a happy ending for a woman in a relationship with a history of abuse and outright cruelty. The same ending in a film made today could succeed as a bitter reflection on the realities of the abuse cycle, but Gilda signs off with a jubilant flourish that just doesn't mesh with the modern mindset. However, the film is written and shot well, and, most importantly, Rita Hayworth as Gilda is bigger than the film itself, and it's worth watching Gilda just to watch Hayworth. Her simultaneous command of her femininity, her wit, her guile, and her fragility is outstanding, and the film suffers for every second she's off screen

  • Nov 12, 2018

    I loved it! Rita is fabulous!

    I loved it! Rita is fabulous!

  • Oct 05, 2018

    Keeps you guessing. What interesting characters they portray! Unlike classical hollywood films.. Definitely a classic, I'm definitely watching it again someday soon! Saw it in a Women and Cinema college course. DEEPTH!

    Keeps you guessing. What interesting characters they portray! Unlike classical hollywood films.. Definitely a classic, I'm definitely watching it again someday soon! Saw it in a Women and Cinema college course. DEEPTH!

  • Jul 18, 2018

    "Gilda" might not be the star-making role for Rita Hayworth, but it is, most definitely, a star-defining role for her. Those images of her are screen legend now. Her fully clothes strip tease is a classic moment. The plot is just fair, but her chemistry with Glenn Ford makes up for it in this film noir classic.

    "Gilda" might not be the star-making role for Rita Hayworth, but it is, most definitely, a star-defining role for her. Those images of her are screen legend now. Her fully clothes strip tease is a classic moment. The plot is just fair, but her chemistry with Glenn Ford makes up for it in this film noir classic.