The Great Dictator Reviews

  • Sep 17, 2020

    Unbelievable speech. People knew more about the dark side of the NSDAP than you might expect at that time, and here's a primary scource.

    Unbelievable speech. People knew more about the dark side of the NSDAP than you might expect at that time, and here's a primary scource.

  • Sep 01, 2020

    Aside from Chaplin’s typically weird use of sound, this is a brilliant classic. Chaplin has never been better, and likely deserved that year’s Oscar (even over Fonda in The Grapes of Wrath).

    Aside from Chaplin’s typically weird use of sound, this is a brilliant classic. Chaplin has never been better, and likely deserved that year’s Oscar (even over Fonda in The Grapes of Wrath).

  • Aug 21, 2020

    The Great Dictator is a perfect comedy that parodies the worst man in human history. I love Charlie Chaplin's direction and performance, as well as the writing, humor and usage of sound. Despite being controversial since being released before America entered World War II, The Great Dictator is considered a masterpiece. Overall, The Great Dictator is a good parody movie and an important film for everyone to see.

    The Great Dictator is a perfect comedy that parodies the worst man in human history. I love Charlie Chaplin's direction and performance, as well as the writing, humor and usage of sound. Despite being controversial since being released before America entered World War II, The Great Dictator is considered a masterpiece. Overall, The Great Dictator is a good parody movie and an important film for everyone to see.

  • Jul 22, 2020

    Charlie Chaplin shows his brand of comedy still had something to say.

    Charlie Chaplin shows his brand of comedy still had something to say.

  • Jun 13, 2020

    Not a fan of slap-stick comedy, but this movie also had great themes and a great overall message, when tackling World War 2 and the Holocaust. It's worth it to see the movie at least once, especially for the ending.

    Not a fan of slap-stick comedy, but this movie also had great themes and a great overall message, when tackling World War 2 and the Holocaust. It's worth it to see the movie at least once, especially for the ending.

  • Jun 11, 2020

    Absolutely timeless! We NEED movies like this!

    Absolutely timeless! We NEED movies like this!

  • Jun 04, 2020

    A biting satire on an obvious figure. It's hard to explain just how bold this movie was when it came out. On top that it's genuinely, timelessly hilarious, Chaplin loses no footing, in moving to sound pictures. And as much as this may be stated, that ending speech is one of the greatest ever given. No matter how many times I hear it, I get chills.

    A biting satire on an obvious figure. It's hard to explain just how bold this movie was when it came out. On top that it's genuinely, timelessly hilarious, Chaplin loses no footing, in moving to sound pictures. And as much as this may be stated, that ending speech is one of the greatest ever given. No matter how many times I hear it, I get chills.

  • May 23, 2020

    Not just the way it is satirized, it has a perfect going through all the film, with so much drama and joy, but also the final speech will prevail forever but the most in hard times. like then.

    Not just the way it is satirized, it has a perfect going through all the film, with so much drama and joy, but also the final speech will prevail forever but the most in hard times. like then.

  • May 08, 2020

    A masterpiece of comedy and drama with Chaplin's great performance

    A masterpiece of comedy and drama with Chaplin's great performance

  • Apr 17, 2020

    Charlie Chaplin's famously prescient tear-down of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany, filmed at the very outset of the second world war (England actually vowed to ban the film due to an early policy of Nazi appeasement, though their attitude flipped before opening day) and released before anyone really understood the height of the German atrocities. Chaplin himself would later express a certain degree of remorse, admitting he never would've made the picture if he'd known just how far the Nazis had gone. It's an important film, certainly an emphatically heartfelt one, and an astoundingly timely message, but it's also plagued with minor quibbles. A handful of conceptually proficient cornerstone scenes, genuine big-screen magic, are good enough to enhance the whole act. Chaplin's mesmerizing bubble dance with an inflatable globe, as a shining example. A cheeky shave-and-a-haircut routine, expertly timed to match the Brahms playing on a grainy box radio. His passionate, enduring speech at the film's climax, eyes locked upon the camera, which still rings, honest and true, in today's combative social climate. At the best of times it's a brilliant example of all Chaplin could offer as an entertainer; a perfect mix of silent film pantomime, well-timed musical accompaniment and passionate, assertive rhetoric. At other points, he clearly struggles with the urge to do what he's always done. To cast aside modern soundtrack demands and merely focus on telling the story through sheer physical poetry. Apart from those few radiant examples, his instinct doesn't come as naturally as it once did. Not every scene works. The plot jerks along in stops and starts. As the film's running time grows cumbersome, we miss essential scraps of story, cutting straight to the finish before each piece is properly aligned. Though Chaplin's noble Jewish barber ultimately gets his moment in the sun, his alternate role as the scheming Hitler-lite despot is hardly served a well-deserved comeuppance. The Great Dictator, essentially Chaplin's last bow as an international icon, gives us much to appreciate, and much to ponder, but a wobbly structure and off-kilter rhythm leaves a lot of its seething, righteous cinematic power unrealized.

    Charlie Chaplin's famously prescient tear-down of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany, filmed at the very outset of the second world war (England actually vowed to ban the film due to an early policy of Nazi appeasement, though their attitude flipped before opening day) and released before anyone really understood the height of the German atrocities. Chaplin himself would later express a certain degree of remorse, admitting he never would've made the picture if he'd known just how far the Nazis had gone. It's an important film, certainly an emphatically heartfelt one, and an astoundingly timely message, but it's also plagued with minor quibbles. A handful of conceptually proficient cornerstone scenes, genuine big-screen magic, are good enough to enhance the whole act. Chaplin's mesmerizing bubble dance with an inflatable globe, as a shining example. A cheeky shave-and-a-haircut routine, expertly timed to match the Brahms playing on a grainy box radio. His passionate, enduring speech at the film's climax, eyes locked upon the camera, which still rings, honest and true, in today's combative social climate. At the best of times it's a brilliant example of all Chaplin could offer as an entertainer; a perfect mix of silent film pantomime, well-timed musical accompaniment and passionate, assertive rhetoric. At other points, he clearly struggles with the urge to do what he's always done. To cast aside modern soundtrack demands and merely focus on telling the story through sheer physical poetry. Apart from those few radiant examples, his instinct doesn't come as naturally as it once did. Not every scene works. The plot jerks along in stops and starts. As the film's running time grows cumbersome, we miss essential scraps of story, cutting straight to the finish before each piece is properly aligned. Though Chaplin's noble Jewish barber ultimately gets his moment in the sun, his alternate role as the scheming Hitler-lite despot is hardly served a well-deserved comeuppance. The Great Dictator, essentially Chaplin's last bow as an international icon, gives us much to appreciate, and much to ponder, but a wobbly structure and off-kilter rhythm leaves a lot of its seething, righteous cinematic power unrealized.