Reviews

  • Mar 15, 2021

    Its 1951 and the communist scare is at an all time high. Robert Dr Niro is David Merrill, he works in Hollywood but the government with the House of Un-American Activities Committee is having him under investigation after coming back from Paris. Attacking the creative community of Hollywood is what they do through censorship and fear. Annette Bening as his wife, Ruth is staring to have doubts about his affiliations and his friend Bunny after he's blacklisted. Merrill wavering his principles might be the only thing he has to combat this deadly confrontation. Because of his political affiliation he can no longer write. His son faces the same kind of backlash being branded a communist, Merrill loses his house, and the studio won't grant him access. This film is based on an actual occurrence known as the Hollywood Blacklist of the 1950s. Books were banned; some were burned. It's a big witch-hunt to track down as many sympathizers without hearing their cases. The final scene leads to a big showdown of proving once and for all Merills involvement. It's brutal and will keep you invested seeing as how so many accused like him were persecuted for years standing up for their beliefs. De Niro is awesome playing a man caught in a world of watchful eyes and unwarranted hate. Sometimes being true to our conscience is more important.

    Its 1951 and the communist scare is at an all time high. Robert Dr Niro is David Merrill, he works in Hollywood but the government with the House of Un-American Activities Committee is having him under investigation after coming back from Paris. Attacking the creative community of Hollywood is what they do through censorship and fear. Annette Bening as his wife, Ruth is staring to have doubts about his affiliations and his friend Bunny after he's blacklisted. Merrill wavering his principles might be the only thing he has to combat this deadly confrontation. Because of his political affiliation he can no longer write. His son faces the same kind of backlash being branded a communist, Merrill loses his house, and the studio won't grant him access. This film is based on an actual occurrence known as the Hollywood Blacklist of the 1950s. Books were banned; some were burned. It's a big witch-hunt to track down as many sympathizers without hearing their cases. The final scene leads to a big showdown of proving once and for all Merills involvement. It's brutal and will keep you invested seeing as how so many accused like him were persecuted for years standing up for their beliefs. De Niro is awesome playing a man caught in a world of watchful eyes and unwarranted hate. Sometimes being true to our conscience is more important.

  • Jul 10, 2020

    Forgettable beside the one courtroom scene.

    Forgettable beside the one courtroom scene.

  • Oct 18, 2018

    to search under the sheets.. Guilty By Suspicion Winkler's scattered vision and fatal attempts of creating an art-sy factory, is a vicious circle that is self-obsessed on its husky bits that clearly isn't concrete enough to stand on the grounds, and fails to focus or even sincerely respect its crispiness. It is well made, the execution too is right on mark, but the script isn't gripping enough to withhold its audience for the runtime. The subject explored is taken granted for the most of the part of it, where the poignancy is manipulated to make you feel for the characters who are frankly undercooked and one-dimensionally displayed. Aforementioned, the narration is neither gripping nor layered enough to search under the sheets, it is flat on emotional level that unfortunately grows shallow as it ages on screen. The final act, that actually is what Winkler has been building up to, is undoubtedly exhilarating and compelling but to suffer for art and that too to this extent, has never been the medium that the audience spoke to. De Niro is hands down, still delivering unflinchingly whether then be its blatant one liners that echos in your mind throughout the course or the tiny notions that his act is brimmed with that speaks more volume than the storytelling itself. He is coy and humble, he is hardworking and firm on his beliefs which is all acted out in its last argument at which every hand of the clock comes down to. Benning, Cooper and Wendt (he is good but fails to steal the show despite of being offered a much stronger role) are supporting him convincingly although surprisingly Benning is underused and isn't given the appropriated range and space to factor in on the bigger picture. Guilty By Suspicion is actually guilty for keeping things mellow, no matter how loud and affirmative Winkler may sound, it certainly isn't that cinematic.

    to search under the sheets.. Guilty By Suspicion Winkler's scattered vision and fatal attempts of creating an art-sy factory, is a vicious circle that is self-obsessed on its husky bits that clearly isn't concrete enough to stand on the grounds, and fails to focus or even sincerely respect its crispiness. It is well made, the execution too is right on mark, but the script isn't gripping enough to withhold its audience for the runtime. The subject explored is taken granted for the most of the part of it, where the poignancy is manipulated to make you feel for the characters who are frankly undercooked and one-dimensionally displayed. Aforementioned, the narration is neither gripping nor layered enough to search under the sheets, it is flat on emotional level that unfortunately grows shallow as it ages on screen. The final act, that actually is what Winkler has been building up to, is undoubtedly exhilarating and compelling but to suffer for art and that too to this extent, has never been the medium that the audience spoke to. De Niro is hands down, still delivering unflinchingly whether then be its blatant one liners that echos in your mind throughout the course or the tiny notions that his act is brimmed with that speaks more volume than the storytelling itself. He is coy and humble, he is hardworking and firm on his beliefs which is all acted out in its last argument at which every hand of the clock comes down to. Benning, Cooper and Wendt (he is good but fails to steal the show despite of being offered a much stronger role) are supporting him convincingly although surprisingly Benning is underused and isn't given the appropriated range and space to factor in on the bigger picture. Guilty By Suspicion is actually guilty for keeping things mellow, no matter how loud and affirmative Winkler may sound, it certainly isn't that cinematic.

  • Apr 10, 2017

    1957 Was 34 Years Old In 1991 And 1922 Was 69 Years Old In 1991 As Well.

    1957 Was 34 Years Old In 1991 And 1922 Was 69 Years Old In 1991 As Well.

  • Jul 30, 2014

    Surprisingly thoughtful account of the Red Scare. De Niro does some great work here.

    Surprisingly thoughtful account of the Red Scare. De Niro does some great work here.

  • Oct 18, 2013

    I watched it with my junior English class just after reading The Crucible. I can't say too much about it because people kept talking over it. From what I could gather: the story was slow, but the acting was great. I felt like it ended a bit abruptly.

    I watched it with my junior English class just after reading The Crucible. I can't say too much about it because people kept talking over it. From what I could gather: the story was slow, but the acting was great. I felt like it ended a bit abruptly.

  • Jan 20, 2013

    Nagelbitare om kommunistjakten i Hollywood. Rapp och välgjord även om den fegar ur lite.

    Nagelbitare om kommunistjakten i Hollywood. Rapp och välgjord även om den fegar ur lite.

  • Jan 09, 2013

    Good script/dialogue. Pretty thrilling story, Annette Benning is stunning.

    Good script/dialogue. Pretty thrilling story, Annette Benning is stunning.

  • Dec 28, 2012

    Enlightening to a historic topic somewhat overlooked. By the end of the film your rawled up and ready to throw a few punches with Jack LaMotta.

    Enlightening to a historic topic somewhat overlooked. By the end of the film your rawled up and ready to throw a few punches with Jack LaMotta.

  • Aug 16, 2012

    This movie depicts the horrible things these left-wing people had to go through during the Maccartism. I find it a little too long, maybe, but every scene is an additional, fundamental detail and another pain for the protagonist, from the betrayal to the trial in front of the commission.

    This movie depicts the horrible things these left-wing people had to go through during the Maccartism. I find it a little too long, maybe, but every scene is an additional, fundamental detail and another pain for the protagonist, from the betrayal to the trial in front of the commission.