Wild Grass (Les Herbes Folles)

2010

Wild Grass (Les Herbes Folles) (2010)

TOMATOMETER

Critic Consensus: Precious to a fault, Wild Grass finds 88-year-old director Alain Resnais as joyously unconstrained as ever.

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Movie Info

A wallet lost and found opens the door -- slightly -- to Georges and Marguerite's romantic adventure. After examining the ID of its owner, it is not a simple matter for Georges to turn in to the police the red wallet he has found. Nor can Marguerite retrieve her wallet without being piqued with curiosity about the person who found it. As George and Marguerite navigate the social protocols of giving and acknowledging thanks, turbulence enters their everyday lives.

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Cast

André Dussollier
as Georges Palet
Sabine Azéma
as Marguerite Muir
Mathieu Amalric
as Bernard de Bordeaux
Michel Vuillermoz
as Lucien d'Orange
Édouard Baer
as Narrator
Annie Cordy
as Neighbor
Vladimir Consigny
as Marcelin Palet
Elric Covarel-Garcia
as Marguerite's Acolyte
Valéry Schatz
as Marguerite's Acolyte
Stéfan Godin
as Marguerite's Acolyte
Grégory Perrin
as Marguerite's Acolyte
Roger Pierre
as Marcel Schwer
Paul Crauchet
as Dental Office Patient
Jean-Michel Ribes
as Dental Office Patient
Nathalie Kanoui
as Dental Office Patient
Adeline Ishiomin
as Dental Office Patient
Lisbeth Arazi Mornet
as Dental Office Patient
Françoise Gillard
as Shoe Saleslady
Magaly Godenaire
as Watch Saleslady
Rosine Cadoret
as Cinema Ticket Saleslady
Vincent Rivard
as Bartender
Dorothée Blanc
as Airline Passenger
Dorothée Blank
as Airline Passenger
Antonin Mineo
as Airline Passenger
Emilie Jeauffroy
as Airline Passenger
Patrick Mimoun
as Jean-Baptiste Larmeur
Isabelle des Courtils
as Madame Larmeur
Candice Charles
as Elodie Larmeur
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News & Interviews for Wild Grass (Les Herbes Folles)

Critic Reviews for Wild Grass (Les Herbes Folles)

All Critics (86) | Top Critics (27)

Alain Resnais keeps sprouting marvelous artistic herbage at an age when most of his contemporaries are pushing up grass from a different perspective.

Sep 21, 2010 | Full Review…

At age 88, Resnais hasn't lost his capacity to confound.

Aug 12, 2010 | Rating: 3.5/4 | Full Review…

What can you say: The French sure know how to make pretty pictures.

Jul 29, 2010 | Rating: 3/5 | Full Review…

Wild Grass might be the strangest film I've seen all year. Maybe all millennium. Is it any good? Quite frankly, I have no idea.

Jul 23, 2010 | Rating: 1/4

Along with such fantasy elements as rich, primary colors and an ending that suggests we've jumped to some other cinematic dimension, Wild Grass, like compulsive filmmaking, embraces the intensity of subjective experience...

Jul 22, 2010 | Rating: 3/4

At 88, the legendary French director Alain Resnais has earned the right to make whatever movie he wants, even a smug deconstructionist parlor game like Wild Grass. Thankfully, this doesn't require you to watch it.

Jul 15, 2010 | Rating: 2/4 | Full Review…
Boston Globe
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Wild Grass (Les Herbes Folles)

Alain Resnais proves at 87 years old that he still has a lot of imagination, delivering this curious nonsensical fable that plays with the conventions of the genre and with our expectations, and the result may feel like not much but is daring enough to be worth our time.

Carlos Magalhães
Carlos Magalhães

Super Reviewer

A man haltingly pursues a woman whose wallet he found. If this is the French New Wave, then I should start watching the Old Wave. In Wild Grass there is so little attention paid to good exposition that I found myself lost, wondering about the characters' relationships to each other even after the first act was a memory. And the performance by Andre Dussolier does little to reveal his character's motivations. Performances like these are good when the story is clear and solid, but Resnais's concentration is on that which is unclear, so the sum is a character who behaves strangely but whose motivations for his strangeness remain a mystery, unconnected to the random shots of weeds. And when he yells and snaps in a romantic story we wonder what the whole point is. Overall, there are people who find this absurdist alienation interesting and refreshing, but I'm not one of them.

Jim Hunter
Jim Hunter

Super Reviewer

Wild Grass has the most fantastic opening scene. We have this vivid imagery, charming narration, an endearing character, and the introduction to an intriguing plot. Everything seems set up just right to lead to something amazing. Well, the thing is, the film opens on it's highest point. While the rest it good, it just feels like a let down after the opening material. Plus, I'm sort of confused why it opens with Marguerite when she really doesn't spend as much time as Georges in the film. I mean, it just seems like she plays a more subordinate role in the thing. Anyway, that's just overanalyzing things, but still there is just something ... off about the rest of the film and I cannot totally put a finger on what it was. I did like how the story is something that at first seems conventional, but does not play out in the way that you would expect it to at all - by and large. Or rather, it guess to the places you would expect, but takes an alternate route to get there. I liked Marguerite quite a lot, but the rest of the characters are sort of forgettable. Idk, the film had it's moments and really is good. It just felt like it was missing something.

Jake ....
Jake ....

Super Reviewer

½

There is a notion to make over 65's retake their driving test for fear they have become dangerous to other road users and themselves. I fear a similar test for senility may be required for revered auteur filmakers to protect their legacy. This film is utterly atrocious in almost every way (the score is ok). Presumably the distinguished cast and crew deferred to Resnais' every whim no matter how crackpot on account of his presumed 'genius'. The list of flaws is endless but succinctly, it seems to condone violent stalking and sexual assault by married octagenarian leches (who bizarrly are supposed to be 50) - women might initially be resistant to one's advances but hold out and then you can ignore them when finally they wake up and see your obvious (?) charms. I sincerely hope for Resnais that this is not thinly veiled autobiography. The characters are totally miscast and unbelievably inconsistent and insincere, the plot makes no sense, tonally it shifts from thrilller to drama to sex farce at will .............. I could go on - almost worth seeing as a spectacle of ineptitude.

Gordon Anderson
Gordon Anderson

Super Reviewer

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