Hollidaysburg (2014) - Rotten Tomatoes

Hollidaysburg (2014)

Hollidaysburg (2014)

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Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

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Movie Info

HOLLIDAYSBURG is a coming-of-age comedy about finding love, and the thrilling first moments of adulthood. When high school friends reunite over their first holiday break during college, they discover just how much they have changed while their town of Hollidaysburg has stayed the same. Within hours of his return, former prom king Scott (Tobin Mitnick) is dumped by his miserable girlfriend, discovers his parents have sold his childhood home, and has to prepare to say goodbye to Hollidaysburg forever. Meanwhile Scott's friend and quasi "kid sister" Tori (Rachel Keller) is in agony after spending unending hours with her embarrassing family. But when Scott and Tori reunite, an unlikely romance blossoms. (C) Starz

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Cast

Kenny Champion
as Heather's Dad
Chris Douglass
as Mike Blum
Claudio Masci
as Chef Claudio
Trisha Simmons
as Judy Humilovich
Yan Xi
as Heather's Mom
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Critic Reviews for Hollidaysburg

All Critics (8) | Top Critics (4)

It's amusing, moving, well-played stuff.

September 29, 2014 | Full Review…

Despite its gimmicky provenance, Hollidaysburg proves to be a nicely low-key, unassuming coming-of-age tale about a group of former high school friends reuniting in their Pennsylvania small town during Thanksgiving college break.

September 23, 2014 | Full Review…

Martemucci intertwines these stories gracefully, and with the charm and charisma of her cast, makes clever banter and script contrivances seem completely natural and unaffected.

September 23, 2014 | Full Review…

"Hollidaysburg" is a pleasant if unremarkable coming-of-age film.

September 18, 2014 | Full Review…

The movie jumps right in without taking the time to properly introduce us to the people we'll be following for 87 minutes. By the time I finally figured everything out, I no longer cared.

September 29, 2014 | Rating: 2/4 | Full Review…

The hormones run hot in Pennsylvania. The weather, cold. The talk is constant. The marijuana plentiful. The action minimal.

September 24, 2014 | Rating: 2.5/5 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Hollidaysburg

The coming-of-age film Hollidaysburg is a fun and satirical indie comedy. Experiencing problems adjusting to college life, two students return to their hometown of Hollidaysburg for the Thanksgiving break and reconnect with their old friends. Newcomer Rachel Keller gives a strong performance and has a magnetic screen presence. Additionally, the humor is rather clever and has a subtleness to it. However, the plot and the characters are a little underdeveloped, and the storytelling is a bit weak. Yet overall, Hollidaysburg is an entertaining film that explores the old adage about whether one can ever really go home again.

Dann Michalski
Dann Michalski

Super Reviewer

½

Last year, Starz aired a reality TV series called The Chair. Produced by actor Zachary Quinto and Project Greenlight breakout Chris Moore, the aim was to give two different directors the same script, the same budget, the same shooting city, and the same access to resources to see what kind of movies they would create. The public would vote on a winner and the winning filmmaker would earn a $250,000 prize. Film is a director's medium, and both of the chosen participants, Shane Dawson and Anna Martemucci, were allowed to rewrite the script, likely to the dismay of screenwriter Dan Schoffer. Dawson has built a following of millions making comedy shorts on his YouTube channel. Martemucci has written and directed one other film and has professional ties to Quinto. Over the course on one winter in Pittsburgh, both Dawson and Martmeucci shot their films under the extra scrutiny of the reality show cameras. Whatever their TV portraits may have been, the work stands on its own. Dawson made the sex comedy Not Cool and Martemucci made the coming-of-age drama, Hollidaysburg. They are two quite different films, but are they any good and is The Chair a success? Going far in the other direction is Hollidaysburg, a modest coming-of-age drama that patterns itself after the mumblecore movement of indie cinema. Director Anna Martemucci definitely takes a more restrained approach to her interpretation of Dan Schoffer's screenplay. She has some problems of her own but on a whole Hollidaysburg is the more promising and well-executed movie. It's more sophisticated, better articulated, heartfelt, and comes far closer to achieving something worthwhile. Right away you can tell a difference. We begin once more with Scott (Tobin Mitnick) and his girlfriend, Heather (Claire Chapelli), break up in the middle of sex, but they keep at it. It's not exaggerated for extra laughs; the situation itself naturally draws them. The character isn't made the butt of the joke either. It's a much more encouraging opening than projectile vomit. Scott is also dumbstruck when he discovers his family home is days away from being emptied and sold. He reconnects with high school acquaintance Tori (Rachel Keller) and the two sleep together impulsively. As they're trying to make sense of possible feelings, Heather is seeking out some company, anybody, and settles on her pot dealer, Petroff (Tristan Erwin), who happens to be buds with Scott. He's wary of stepping over some kind of friend code, but in his efforts to get Heather out of her funk, Petroff starts to form a romantic interest he can't help. The focus is on our foursome of young, curious, and emotionally free-falling characters stumbling for some sense of personal identity. The theme of the film is about stasis versus change. Heather reasons that their long-distance relationship is not meant to be, and that it's better to check out early. She's also disillusioned by college, an experience that she had hoped would be remarkable at pointing her life in the right direction. Scott is quite literally saying goodbye to his childhood and his prior sense of who he was. His task for the holiday weekend is to pack the last of his childhood things in his old room so they can be sent to Florida. He won't be returning to Pennsylvania likely, which is what Tori is also wrestling with. How far does she let herself get attached to something that could never happen? The two of them dance around their attraction and unconventional courtship. There's real uncertainty about their possibility as a couple that's palpable. Then there's Heather's sense of ennui that might just be a symptom of depression. She feels like she's in a fog and that college is not the gateway others perceive it to be. Petroff is trying to juggle his role as friend and potential more-than-friend, and even though he has no real obligation to Scott on this one, he is trying to be deferential and sensitive. Before the breakup, he didn't even consider Heather a friend. Now they're getting to know one another on a much more personal level. The foursome is likeable, complicated, flawed, and pleasant to be around, enough to excuse some of the movie's genial pacing. There are assorting supporting characters, notably siblings to Scott and Tori, but they are complimentary and better inform the story. Scott's older brother spends the entire film trying to recreate his father's recipe for pumpkin pie. It's just the sort of concept that is slight enough to be fun but also lead into a dramatic character payoff. The dialogue feels attuned to the natural speech rhythms of human beings while still being entertaining. Scott and Tori's initial reunion revolves around her keeping watch to make sure he doesn't have a concussion after she hit him with her car. It's a cute scenario that's played with the right flirty tone that nicely sells the emergence of their romance. The humor isn't as loud and underlined as Not Cool, and that's to its benefit. Your enjoyment of Hollidaysburg (named after a city in Pennsylvania) will depend mightily on your personal tolerance for the observational, delicate human comedies of the mumblecore genre. Sometimes derided as affluent navel-gazing, the often-DIY subgenre can have its own hardscrabble charm and touch upon relatable themes and conflicts that transcend their often self-indulgent characters. There's also a stronger sense of realism in how fleshed out these worlds feel, and so I have enjoyed mumblecore primarily because of the combination of well-developed characters, emotional truths, and sincerity. I acknowledge a movie about a bunch of teenagers sitting around, mingling, smoking pot, and making life decisions is a harder sell than, say, sex comedy shenanigans. The difference is that you feel the care put in by Martemucci. She cares about these people and makes you start to care as well, or at least be interested. But if you're not on the same wavelengths, one person's observational is another person's doddering. While technically better on just about every level, Hollidaysburg has its own issues. The character arcs for Scott and Tori are rather nebulous. I'll credit Dawson with this, in Not Cool the characters' arcs were front and center and there was a progression. With Hollidaysburg, Scott is vaguely defined by his past but he doesn't go into many details, failing to indicate how he's undergoing some sort of high school hangover as he adjust to a bigger pond. He's uncomfortable with the discovery of how close Heather and Petroff have gotten, but this character turn doesn't get developed enough to matter, instead coming across as a somewhat manufactured conflict break. Likewise Tori is looking to redefine herself in college but finding it harder than she anticipated. By the end of the film, her closing voice over quotes John Updike about being reborn every day, and how reassuring she finds this reflection. You could make the argument that through her romantic tryst with Scott, she's better accepted the notion that she will define herself as she pleases, but I don't even know if that approaches the conclusion. The two characters with the more clearly defined arcs are Heather and Petroff, and they're on a relatively straightforward path where their biggest obstacle is hiding their emerging feelings from their mutual friend who would be hurt. I don't necessarily know if I'd call The Chair a success. The fascinating premise has given birth to very different movies, but in the end one of them is a aggressively unfunny comedy and the other is an acceptable coming-of-age mumblecore entry. It's hard to call either a rousing success. Not Cool is an abysmal comedy that is overly reliant on witless shock humor to substitute for storytelling basics. Dawson makes a slew of bad decisions, mostly playing to ego or his built-in audience, but I'll say at least he goes for it. Martemucci certainly comes across as the more promising filmmaker; her film is better on a technical level and her handling of actors is far defter. At the same time, her aim is lower with her goals and her character arcs less defined. I suppose you could argue the hazy arcs tap into the characters trying to better find themselves but I won't. Hollidaysburg is clearly the better film but Dawson's legions of fans came to his service, and in the fall of 2014, Dawson was declared the victor by a majority of public voting. I purposely wanted to watch the finished movies before delving into the TV show so my feelings toward the filmmakers would not influence my reviews. Usually Project Greenlight was at its best when things were falling apart for its fledgling filmmakers, and I imagine the same level of entertainment will be had with The Chair. My foreknowledge will create a delicious dose of dramatic irony, as I know what all these efforts will lead toward. In my head I'll likely be thinking, "Not worth it." I'll add to this double-review after watching the series for any additional thought on Dawson and Martemucci as filmmakers and human beings. Nate's Grade: B-

Nate Zoebl
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

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