Lisa And The Devil (Lisa e il diavolo) (The Devil in the House of Exorcism) Reviews

  • Jul 03, 2019

    Telly Savalas is as camp as ever in the film and just plays himself. The film is somewhat muddled, but has some great scenes, although parts of it do not make sense it is still enjoyable.

    Telly Savalas is as camp as ever in the film and just plays himself. The film is somewhat muddled, but has some great scenes, although parts of it do not make sense it is still enjoyable.

  • Jul 31, 2017

    The film displays Bava's most prominent strength, i.e. gorgeous visuals. The cinematography is beautiful throughout with exemplary use of color. From the striking opening credit sequence in which tarot cards are used to introduce the characters, to the early scenes in the empty streets of the ancient city where Lisa is framed beautifully against the old architecture, to the ornate interiors of the ominous villa, the visual eloquence is well in abundance from start to finish and really creates a great sense of mood and atmosphere. There is visual invention on display all the way through this one, with inventive shots aplenty, complemented further by the lush music score from Carlo Savina. The overall effect is very dream-like. For a viewer to have any chance of appreciating this strange lyrical movie they will have to have at least some tolerance for narrative uncertainty. This one unashamedly puts emphasis on mood over plot and atmosphere over sense. It's certainly not a film for everyone - many horror fans will be put off by its deliberate pacing and unusual tone - but it is a movie which will reward patient viewers who appreciate Euro horror from the more abstract end of the spectrum.

    The film displays Bava's most prominent strength, i.e. gorgeous visuals. The cinematography is beautiful throughout with exemplary use of color. From the striking opening credit sequence in which tarot cards are used to introduce the characters, to the early scenes in the empty streets of the ancient city where Lisa is framed beautifully against the old architecture, to the ornate interiors of the ominous villa, the visual eloquence is well in abundance from start to finish and really creates a great sense of mood and atmosphere. There is visual invention on display all the way through this one, with inventive shots aplenty, complemented further by the lush music score from Carlo Savina. The overall effect is very dream-like. For a viewer to have any chance of appreciating this strange lyrical movie they will have to have at least some tolerance for narrative uncertainty. This one unashamedly puts emphasis on mood over plot and atmosphere over sense. It's certainly not a film for everyone - many horror fans will be put off by its deliberate pacing and unusual tone - but it is a movie which will reward patient viewers who appreciate Euro horror from the more abstract end of the spectrum.

  • Jan 13, 2016

    This is one of Mario Bava's more psychedelic films (which is saying something), as well as one of his more frustrating. It feels like it could have been a lot better had it been a bit more focused. But alas, we are left with a movie that is merely okay, but not great. Telly Savalas is enjoyably sinister, though.

    This is one of Mario Bava's more psychedelic films (which is saying something), as well as one of his more frustrating. It feels like it could have been a lot better had it been a bit more focused. But alas, we are left with a movie that is merely okay, but not great. Telly Savalas is enjoyably sinister, though.

  • Jun 27, 2015

    Mike slipped. Lisa is an American tourist that takes a tour in an ancient Spanish village and discovers a mosaic of the devil. She becomes very interested in the piece and has some interesting encounters. One night she is forced to take refuge in a strange mansion with an interesting house keeper. She may have found what she was looking for in the town in the mansion. "The thought of losing you fills one with much sadness." Mario Bava, director of Kill Baby, Kill; Black Sabbath; Black Sunday; Roy Colt and Winchester Jack; Knives of the Avenger; and Blood and Black Lace, delivers Lisa and the Devil. The storyline for this picture is pretty interesting and fun to watch unfold. Some of the sequences were cheesy but it's an old classic. The cast delivers solid performances and includes Telly Savalas, Elke Sommer, Sylva Koscina, and Alida Valli. "I am no longer a child. Let me live my life!" I came across this on Netflix as part of the Mario Bava collection and had to watch it. I enjoyed the film and thought it was better than many of the films in this collection. Telly Savalas was great in his role and kept the film off balance. This is a good film for fans of the genre. "I was not introduced to the fifth guest." Grade: C+

    Mike slipped. Lisa is an American tourist that takes a tour in an ancient Spanish village and discovers a mosaic of the devil. She becomes very interested in the piece and has some interesting encounters. One night she is forced to take refuge in a strange mansion with an interesting house keeper. She may have found what she was looking for in the town in the mansion. "The thought of losing you fills one with much sadness." Mario Bava, director of Kill Baby, Kill; Black Sabbath; Black Sunday; Roy Colt and Winchester Jack; Knives of the Avenger; and Blood and Black Lace, delivers Lisa and the Devil. The storyline for this picture is pretty interesting and fun to watch unfold. Some of the sequences were cheesy but it's an old classic. The cast delivers solid performances and includes Telly Savalas, Elke Sommer, Sylva Koscina, and Alida Valli. "I am no longer a child. Let me live my life!" I came across this on Netflix as part of the Mario Bava collection and had to watch it. I enjoyed the film and thought it was better than many of the films in this collection. Telly Savalas was great in his role and kept the film off balance. This is a good film for fans of the genre. "I was not introduced to the fifth guest." Grade: C+

  • Jun 04, 2015

    Lesser-caliber Mario Bava thriller is neither very suspenseful nor very over-the-top.

    Lesser-caliber Mario Bava thriller is neither very suspenseful nor very over-the-top.

  • Dec 19, 2014

    Not exactly horrifying (even though it belongs to the oeuvre of horror maestro Mario Bava) but instead imbued with the qualities of a (rather disturbed) dream. I think it is probably Elke Sommer's dream (although then confusingly she might have a dream within this dream too). Or maybe it is Telly Savalas's dream - he is one of the few characters that remains alive at the end (and perhaps he is the devil of the title). Still as some commentators have pointed out, there is a thin line between life and death here and between mannikin and flesh. So maybe everyone is alive in that airplane at the end (a surreal gesture not unlike Bunuel's conclusion to Simon of the Desert)? Bava's images are woozy, colourful, and sometimes indistinct. The plot, as far as one can tell, involves Sommer's trip to Spain being interrupted by a badly timed decision to hitch-hike in a car that subsequently breaks down at Alida Valli's possibly haunted mansion where she is mistaken for a corpse to which she may have borne a distinct resemblance. OK, only dream logic applies! (Original version watched -- not House of Exorcism)

    Not exactly horrifying (even though it belongs to the oeuvre of horror maestro Mario Bava) but instead imbued with the qualities of a (rather disturbed) dream. I think it is probably Elke Sommer's dream (although then confusingly she might have a dream within this dream too). Or maybe it is Telly Savalas's dream - he is one of the few characters that remains alive at the end (and perhaps he is the devil of the title). Still as some commentators have pointed out, there is a thin line between life and death here and between mannikin and flesh. So maybe everyone is alive in that airplane at the end (a surreal gesture not unlike Bunuel's conclusion to Simon of the Desert)? Bava's images are woozy, colourful, and sometimes indistinct. The plot, as far as one can tell, involves Sommer's trip to Spain being interrupted by a badly timed decision to hitch-hike in a car that subsequently breaks down at Alida Valli's possibly haunted mansion where she is mistaken for a corpse to which she may have borne a distinct resemblance. OK, only dream logic applies! (Original version watched -- not House of Exorcism)

  • Mar 10, 2014

    Have you ever seen CARNIVAL OF SOULS? Well, that is the basic plot of LISA AND THE DEVIL except it is more mystical, beautiful, and sensual. Elke Sommer plays Lisa, a tourist who becomes involved with an intricate plot of mannequins, murders, and necrophilia in the family home of a countess and her estranged son. The movie is one that you have to pay VERY close attention to, every scene has importance. I think everyone has their own opinion on the meaning of this film, it's very fun to draw your own up. It feels like the movie grabbed hold of you and you are actually part of the mystery. This is a must-have movie.

    Have you ever seen CARNIVAL OF SOULS? Well, that is the basic plot of LISA AND THE DEVIL except it is more mystical, beautiful, and sensual. Elke Sommer plays Lisa, a tourist who becomes involved with an intricate plot of mannequins, murders, and necrophilia in the family home of a countess and her estranged son. The movie is one that you have to pay VERY close attention to, every scene has importance. I think everyone has their own opinion on the meaning of this film, it's very fun to draw your own up. It feels like the movie grabbed hold of you and you are actually part of the mystery. This is a must-have movie.

  • Jan 26, 2014

    A wild hypnotic gothic tale from the master Mario Bava. Make sure you avoid the American cut "House of Exorcism" at all costs. It is truly terrible

    A wild hypnotic gothic tale from the master Mario Bava. Make sure you avoid the American cut "House of Exorcism" at all costs. It is truly terrible

  • Dec 29, 2013

    Lisa e il Diavolo (The House of Exorcism) (Mario Bava, 1974) I don't know why I keep watching Mario Bava movies. I've seen all of those that people have recommended to me over and over again and found them anywhere from mediocre (Bay of Blood) to utterly unwatchable (Black Sunday). And yet so many people I know are so taken with Bava's movies that I keep trying. I don't do that with Woody Allen or Godard, so what is it about Bava? That said, I may have finally found the movie that will put me off him forever, Lisa e il Diavolo. Incoherent, rambling, badly-paced, and one of the largest wastes of A-list talent I have ever experienced, this movie would be best-served with the piquant odor of burning celluloid. I'd give you a plot synopsis, but for this movie, that is well-nigh impossible. It involves the titular Lisa (delicious B-movie temptress Elke Sommer), who attracts the eye of a very wealthy, very perverse chap with a mannequin fetish, Leandro (Blood and Lace's Telly Savalas). During a tour of a foreign land, her car breaks down, and she and her chauffeur (Emmanuelle and the Last Cannibals' Gabriele Tinti), along with the husband and wife from whom she hitched a ride, Max and Sophie (The Count of Monte Cristo's Alessio Orano and Boccaccio's Sylva Koscina), are forced to find shelter in the decaying mansion of a countess (The Third Man's Alida Valli-oh, how far the mighty have fallen) who may or may not be in league with the diabolical forces who seem to have taken as much of a shine to Lisa as Leandro has. Man, I wish, given that cast (did I mention Eduardo Fajardo is in here as well?), there was one thing I could say about this movie that sounds like a vaguely redeeming quality. That's usually a stable of actors where at least one will turn in a performance that make a movie at least marginally worth watching, but it's almost as if Bava coached them to be as stale and lifeless as possible. Simply put, in every conceivable way, this is an awful, awful movie, and it easily earned itself a place on the 100 Worst list. It was saved from zero-star status simply because it wasn't overtly offensive and I finished watching it, for some unknown reason. Avoid like the plague. 1/2

    Lisa e il Diavolo (The House of Exorcism) (Mario Bava, 1974) I don't know why I keep watching Mario Bava movies. I've seen all of those that people have recommended to me over and over again and found them anywhere from mediocre (Bay of Blood) to utterly unwatchable (Black Sunday). And yet so many people I know are so taken with Bava's movies that I keep trying. I don't do that with Woody Allen or Godard, so what is it about Bava? That said, I may have finally found the movie that will put me off him forever, Lisa e il Diavolo. Incoherent, rambling, badly-paced, and one of the largest wastes of A-list talent I have ever experienced, this movie would be best-served with the piquant odor of burning celluloid. I'd give you a plot synopsis, but for this movie, that is well-nigh impossible. It involves the titular Lisa (delicious B-movie temptress Elke Sommer), who attracts the eye of a very wealthy, very perverse chap with a mannequin fetish, Leandro (Blood and Lace's Telly Savalas). During a tour of a foreign land, her car breaks down, and she and her chauffeur (Emmanuelle and the Last Cannibals' Gabriele Tinti), along with the husband and wife from whom she hitched a ride, Max and Sophie (The Count of Monte Cristo's Alessio Orano and Boccaccio's Sylva Koscina), are forced to find shelter in the decaying mansion of a countess (The Third Man's Alida Valli-oh, how far the mighty have fallen) who may or may not be in league with the diabolical forces who seem to have taken as much of a shine to Lisa as Leandro has. Man, I wish, given that cast (did I mention Eduardo Fajardo is in here as well?), there was one thing I could say about this movie that sounds like a vaguely redeeming quality. That's usually a stable of actors where at least one will turn in a performance that make a movie at least marginally worth watching, but it's almost as if Bava coached them to be as stale and lifeless as possible. Simply put, in every conceivable way, this is an awful, awful movie, and it easily earned itself a place on the 100 Worst list. It was saved from zero-star status simply because it wasn't overtly offensive and I finished watching it, for some unknown reason. Avoid like the plague. 1/2

  • May 24, 2013

    utter bizarre classic

    utter bizarre classic