I, Tonya (2017) - Rotten Tomatoes

I, Tonya (2017)

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: Led by strong work from Margot Robbie and Alison Janney, I, Tonya finds the humor in its real-life story without losing sight of its more tragic -- and emotionally resonant -- elements.

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Based on the unbelievable, but true events, I, TONYA is a darkly comedic tale of American figure skater, Tonya Harding, and one of the most sensational scandals in sports history. Though Harding was the first American woman to complete a triple axel in competition, her legacy was forever defined by her association with an infamous, ill-conceived, and even more poorly executed attack on fellow Olympic competitor Nancy Kerrigan. Featuring an iconic turn by Margot Robbie as the fiery Harding, a mustachioed Sebastian Stan as her impetuous ex-husband Jeff Gillooly, a tour-de-force performance from Allison Janney as her acid-tongued mother, LaVona Golden, and an original screenplay by Steven Rogers, Craig Gillespie's I, TONYA is an absurd, irreverent, and piercing portrayal of Harding's life and career in all of its unchecked--and checkered--glory.

Cast

Margot Robbie
as Tonya Harding
Sebastian Stan
as Jeff Gillooly
Allison Janney
as LaVona Golden
Paul Walter Hauser
as Shawn Eckhardt
Julianne Nicholson
as Diane Rawlinson
McKenna Grace
as Young Tonya Harding
Caitlin Carver
as Nancy Kerrigan
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Critic Reviews for I, Tonya

All Critics (118) | Top Critics (30)

Tonya's been a punching bag for everyone, including the public. And yes, the film implicates us in that. But her defiance grows with every heckle, including her mother's.

December 12, 2017 | Full Review…
Top Critic

This remarkable movie-factual and funny, always surprising and unconventionally written, directed and acted-sets the record straight with an adrenalin rush that overwhelms the senses.

December 11, 2017 | Rating: 4/4 | Full Review…

The film is periodically enlivened by some of the supporting players, including Paul Walter Hauser as Shawn Eckhardt, the supposed mastermind of the Kerrigan assault whom the movie depicts as a world-class schlub.

December 8, 2017 | Rating: B- | Full Review…

Destroyed yet defiant, Robbie walks the emotional tightrope of the most fabulously, tragically American film of the year.

December 7, 2017 | Rating: 5/5 | Full Review…

Impressive in its own right, "I, Tonya" offers an antidote to those feel-good films about innately noble athletes who manage to triumph over impossible odds.

December 7, 2017 | Full Review…

I, Tonya takes greater risks with the biopic genre than any other in recent memory, and it's remarkable how much of it lands upright. It's the triple axel of based-on-true-story movies.

December 7, 2017 | Full Review…
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for I, Tonya

Back in 1994, popular culture was rabidly obsessed with figure skating thanks to Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie), the "bad girl" who was accused of coordinating an attack on her skating rival, Nancy Kerrigan. Tonya's skuzzy husband, Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan), had hired a friend to "intimidate" Kerrigan, and the end result was a broken knee and the world-famous outcry of, "Why?!" I, Tonya takes a look at the players of this media circus and lets them tell their own stories in their own words. I,Tonya feels brazenly like a Scorsese movie populated with kooky Coen brothers characters. Director Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl) cribs from the best and uses all those propulsive camera moves, voice over leading to fourth-wall-breaking, and music needle drops to draw an audience into this crackling crime story. The biggest decision made by screenwriter Steven Rogers (P.S. I Love You) is the dueling perspectives of Tonya and Jeff being given equal treatment. They both sit for a series of on-camera interviews and will even interrupt the flashbacks to object. Jeff will recount a time Tonya chased him around with a loaded shotgun, and then Tonya will turn to the camera and argue that this moment never happened. I, Tonya doesn't tell you who to believe and who to doubt. The account will purposely contradict one another, often demonizing the other party and painting themselves as a larger victim of fate. The movie is steadily entertaining as it mixes moments of light and dark. Tonya breaking the fourth wall to talk about her domestic abuse is another way of showing just his disassociated she's become to a life of abuse. It turns fourth wall break into coping mechanism. I was laughing at the buffoonery of Jeff's goons and moved by the relentless torment of Tonya. It's a story that's worth revisiting and is given an invigorating sheen of inept crime thriller. Gillespie goes a little too hard with the Scorsese speed ramp zooms and quantity of literal song selections, but it doesn't detract from the film's overall entertainment impact. This is a film about reassessing preconceived notions about who the characters are, what the story exactly is, and where the truth lies amidst all the madness. Tonya scoffs, "There is no such thing as truth," as if she were channeling the forty-fifth president of the United States of America. This becomes a foundational thesis of the movie as we're presented with conflicting personal accounts where characters will break the fourth wall to criticize the validity of what they are doing or saying. All of these conflicting accounts force the audience to constantly reconsider what we are seeing and being told. We have to consistently think about the source and how there might be bias at play. As expected, Tonya and Jeff's differing versions of events paint the other as more knowingly duplicitous. Tonya flat-out accuses Jeff of years of physical abuse, the kind of relationship Tonya's vicious mother had primed her for. LaVona Golden (Allison Janney) would say all of her cruel hostility was valuable in an ends-justify-the-means crucible. Through fighting to earn the approval of an abusive authority figure, Tonya became one of the greatest figure skaters in the world, the first to achieve the vaulted triple axle. LaVona shouts that "nice" doesn't get you anything in this world (her own mother was nice and LaVona became a waitress). People throughout I, Tonya are reshaping worldviews, angling for sympathy, and spinning history for personal advantage. Everyone wants to be a victim, a martyr, or at least the person who was right in the end. By the end, you don't know what exactly to believe and whose truth is closest. This was a media scandal that the public gladly gobbled up every new morsel, bringing out the knives to carve up a villain served up on the Olympic stage, but I, Tonya is a very empathetic portrayal that still doesn't take the edge off of its title heroine. She grew up poor and scrappy and had to make her own costumes for her skating performances. From a technical standpoint, Tonya Harding could out skate anyone, but she didn't fit into the cookie cutter beauty pageant image of what a wholesome girl should represent. The same bias against her, the trailer trash girl who couldn't catch a break, was still dragging her down even when her skating was superior to her competitors. It definitely helps to paint a sympathetic portrayal for the woman, and that's even before the years of abusive relationships, and a husband she may have returned to in order to appear more "wholesome family." It's easy to castigate Tonya Harding as a villain, but it's even harder to see the person inside the caricature that was sold for mass media consumption. The use of humor has to be very delicate because of all the controversial material. We have naturally offbeat characters doing incredibly stupid things, and then we have a husband repeatedly hitting his wife. This seesaw of tone means that the comedy needs to be precise or else it will undercut the drama or, worse, cross into gross mitigation of abuse. LaVona is a popular source for verbal abuse, and it's meant to be shocking, but at no point do I think the film trivializes the conditions of Tonya's childhood for ironic comic fodder. It's presenting an abnormal treatment of an abnormal upbringing, and the later detours with "The Incident" are highlighting the naturally cracked criminals. These people were not good at what they were doing and were easily caught. The nimwits-try-their-hands-at-crime subgenre is ripe for laughter, in particular Shawn Eckhardt (Paul Walter Hauser) and his self-professed masterful skills at counter terrorism planning. The Tonya Harding scandal is so inherently sensational and with so many bizarre, colorful characters that to treat it without its penchant of natural humor would be a disservice. Crazy people doing dumb things are going to tend to have some humor value. Where the film falls short is in the realm of media satire. There are a few tasty morsels sprinkled throughout, like LaVona forcing reporters to stand behind a rope line if they wanted to snap her picture, but overall the media satire feels flat. Bobby Cannavale (Spy) feels completely wasted as a Hard Copy reporter/exposition device. He offers few insights and fewer colorful anecdotes. The most pointed the film gets with media commentary is when Tonya looks directly into the camera and accuses each person of being her abuser. It's a stark turn that stops the action cold, and the audience has to think about their own tacit approval through media consumption. By rewarding this coverage and the easily packaged version of events, have we all played a part in Tonya's suffering and shame? Robbie (Suicide Squad) is sensational in the role, eliciting so much emotion that it can instill whiplash. One moment you're impressed by the depth of her vulnerability and the next you're whistling at her hard-as-nails persona and sheer tenacity. It's an unapologetic performance that goes dark places and serious places, but Robbie doesn't stoop to pander. Tonya wants your empathy but she doesn't want your pity, and she sure as hell isn't going to pretend to be somebody she's not. The tricky part is the question over who is Tonya Harding. With Robbie, she's a profane firebrand who is impatient with a world that refuses to accept her and her talents. The scene where Tonya is stripped of ever competing again in professional figure skating is a dazzling piece of acting on Robbie's part. Tonya has sacrificed much of her own life for this sport, and by her own admission she doesn't know how to do anything else. To see it all go away with the pound of a gable, she pleads for jail instead as a more humane punishment. This feels like Robbie marking her grand entrance into the next acting echelon in Hollywood. The supporting roles nicely serve their purpose, with Janney (The Girl on the Train) being the obvious standout. Her hellish mother is overpowering in every sense. Janney is abrasive and fierce and a crutch for the screenplay when it needs something shocking. I do not doubt the voracity of what the Tonya and other participants have said about LaVona, but the filmmakers don't know when to leave enough alone. There are insights to be had through LaVona's relationship with her daughter but it's too often one-note. She's the angry older woman berating people for shock, comedy, or a transition. I, Tonya might change your mind about Tonya Harding. She's definitely unrepentant in the movie while at the same time asking you to view her with an empathy that was lacking during the parade of 1990s tabloids. She's an abuse survivor who had to claw for every advantage she could earn. You might not like her, or maybe you'll grow to appreciate her, but you will understand her better. Robbie is outstanding, Janney is highly memorable and perfectly cast, and the direction provides plenty of jolts, from electric camerawork to the energetic propulsion through its diverging viewpoints. The dark comedy works, the serious drama works, and the domestic violence is not trivialized with so many ironic winks. I, Tonya is an unflinching expose that forces you to question the validity of everything. It's a movie that dares you to question your perceptions while you're keenly watching. Perhaps twenty years later, Tonya Harding will get whatever she is due. Nate's Grade: B+

Nate Zoebl
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

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