Kill Bill: Volume 1 Reviews

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Nell Minow
Common Sense Media
December 24, 2010
Visually striking, but also very violent.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Brian Orndorf
Modamag.com
December 28, 2009
A head-spinning dream project of extraordinarily bi-polar, nutso invention, Vol. 1 is a candy store rampage, cheering on Tarantino's fetishes as he built a colorful war machine of ideal double-feature dementia.
Full Review | Original Score: A
Cole Smithey
ColeSmithey.com
April 19, 2009
Quentin Tarantino's long awaited fourth film finds the pop culture carnivore of filmmaking reinvigorating cinema a second time over with a single-plot-trajectory revenge movie that utilizes samurai sword action with a shifting score of infectious guitar d
Full Review | Original Score: A-
Urban Cinefile Critics
Urban Cinefile
October 18, 2008
With its eclectic use of music and inventive mix of genres, Kill Bill is a striking and enigmatic revenge film visually and culturally rich and relentless in its action.
Peter Canavese
Groucho Reviews
September 22, 2008
Something borrowed, something bloody. [Blu-ray]
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Mark Halverson
Sacramento News & Review
August 7, 2008
Tarantino instead relies on delirious, high-octane, imaginative camera work; an anime sequence; and an exhilarating musical soundtrack to punch up a story that loses its intoxicating magnetism well before the final credits roll.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
Todd McCarthy
Variety
May 7, 2008
A strange, fun and densely textured work that gets better as it goes along.
Top Critic
Jonathan Rosenbaum
Chicago Reader
May 7, 2008
Even more gory and adolescent than its models, which explains both the fun and the unpleasantness of this globe-trotting romp.
Philip French
Observer [UK]
May 7, 2008
I didn't leave the cinema aching to see Volume Two (out in February), though I'm interested to learn how things work out.
Rob Gonsalves
eFilmCritic.com
August 4, 2007
Kill Bill is a temple of worship -- a devout hymn of praise to crap cinema (which isn't always crappy).
Full Review | Original Score: 5/5
Joe Lozito
Big Picture Big Sound
July 14, 2007
Kill Bill is pretty stupid, but there are also moments of beauty and brilliance.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Emanuel Levy
EmanuelLevy.Com
December 20, 2006
Unfolding as a book the film is conceived in chapters, each boasting the look and pulse of a specific genre; as expected of Tarantino, there are references to music, literature, fashion, and above all movies and pop culture, both American and foreign.
Full Review | Original Score: B
Top Critic

Time Out
June 24, 2006
It's all bang, bang; no kiss, kiss. But this is still bravura film-making from a prodigious talent, and Thurman may yet prove its saving grace.
Jason Zingale
Bullz-Eye.com
July 5, 2005
One of the best films of the year, and, when it's all said and done, probably the decade.
Full Review | Original Score: 4.5/5
Garth Franklin
Dark Horizons
April 2, 2005
Tarantino is back with his most polished and yet slightly empty effort yet.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/5
Jordan Hiller
Bangitout.com
March 9, 2005
A movie that, without Uma, would have ultimately been a stylistic masterpiece, but never the stirring epic that it is shaping up to be.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5
Ethan Alter
NYC Film Critic
March 5, 2005
Perhaps the funniest thing about Kill Bill: Volume One is the realization that this ode to ultraviolence and Uma Thurman's feet is probably Quentin Tarantino's most personal film.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/5
Jeffrey Overstreet
Looking Closer
January 15, 2005
Volume One is, above all, a parade of fantastic fight scenes, each one bloodier than the one that came before ... bloody in the Looney-Toons/Monty-Python sense.
| Original Score: C+
Maximilian Le Cain
Senses of Cinema
August 16, 2004
Different enough from Tarantino's previous work to finally win over even an inveterate Tarantino-sceptic like me.
Top Critic
Peter Rainer
New York Magazine/Vulture
August 7, 2004
There is no ironic overlay in Tarantino's movies, no 'commenting' on the pop schlock he's replicating. He simply wants to remake in his own way the kinds of movies he's always loved, and he's about as uncynical as a movie geek can be.
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