Lords of Chaos Reviews

  • 4d ago

    rubbish take on black metal and the events that happened if youwant a better take on thing watch Until the light takes us. Mayhem, Burzum and Dark Throne wouldn't give permission for there music to be used in the movie that's how bad it is.

    rubbish take on black metal and the events that happened if youwant a better take on thing watch Until the light takes us. Mayhem, Burzum and Dark Throne wouldn't give permission for there music to be used in the movie that's how bad it is.

  • May 19, 2020

    When the deadliest sin is proving you're not a poser, the message behind the make-up becomes a true threat to society. Norwegian Black Metal, which undoubtedly influenced much of the 2000s screamo, thrash, speed, and numerous other insufferable styles of heavy metal, has the most insane origin story out there, probably. And that is what this film is about. Don't get me wrong, Euronymous (Rory Culkin (Macauly and Kieran's younger brother)), Dead (Jack Kilmer (Val's son)), Faust (Valter Skarsgard (Yes, of the famous thespian Swedish ilk), Varg (Emory Cohen), and the rest of these assholes are, bar none, some of the biggest pieces of shit I've ever seen. Rich kids whose parents pay for their businesses, studio time, and instruments, that need to prove their allegiance (or whatever) to Satan by mutilating animals, murdering homosexuals, and burning down centuries-old churches; "The churches are oppressing us with their goodness and kindness… we should burn them down," is an actual quote. They're part Satanist, part Pagan, part Nazi, full nihilist, all of which a journalist comically points out when he is invited into Varg's apartment. That being said, the unpredictability of the characters keeps you engaged, even if, you're like me, you're kinda just hoping they one-by-one take a page out of Dead's playbook and shoot themselves in the face. Culkin's Euronymous is the closest we get to a lead, and he really is fantastic. He's the character with the best arc and smidge of sympathy. He talks a big game, and as much as he wants to be authentic, hesitates and mitigates as much as possible without being condemned as a poser. Varg (né Kristian, an unacceptable name for this Neo-Satanist-Pagan-Nazi), calls out Euronymous's lack of badassery and takes their shit to the next level. Varg, who meekly approaches the band as a fan, only for Euronymous to dismiss him, becomes a tornado of misogyny, vengeance, and hate, and you can't look away. "World famous all over Oslo," Euronymous says when the band is still practicing in his parents' basement. I really liked that line.

    When the deadliest sin is proving you're not a poser, the message behind the make-up becomes a true threat to society. Norwegian Black Metal, which undoubtedly influenced much of the 2000s screamo, thrash, speed, and numerous other insufferable styles of heavy metal, has the most insane origin story out there, probably. And that is what this film is about. Don't get me wrong, Euronymous (Rory Culkin (Macauly and Kieran's younger brother)), Dead (Jack Kilmer (Val's son)), Faust (Valter Skarsgard (Yes, of the famous thespian Swedish ilk), Varg (Emory Cohen), and the rest of these assholes are, bar none, some of the biggest pieces of shit I've ever seen. Rich kids whose parents pay for their businesses, studio time, and instruments, that need to prove their allegiance (or whatever) to Satan by mutilating animals, murdering homosexuals, and burning down centuries-old churches; "The churches are oppressing us with their goodness and kindness… we should burn them down," is an actual quote. They're part Satanist, part Pagan, part Nazi, full nihilist, all of which a journalist comically points out when he is invited into Varg's apartment. That being said, the unpredictability of the characters keeps you engaged, even if, you're like me, you're kinda just hoping they one-by-one take a page out of Dead's playbook and shoot themselves in the face. Culkin's Euronymous is the closest we get to a lead, and he really is fantastic. He's the character with the best arc and smidge of sympathy. He talks a big game, and as much as he wants to be authentic, hesitates and mitigates as much as possible without being condemned as a poser. Varg (né Kristian, an unacceptable name for this Neo-Satanist-Pagan-Nazi), calls out Euronymous's lack of badassery and takes their shit to the next level. Varg, who meekly approaches the band as a fan, only for Euronymous to dismiss him, becomes a tornado of misogyny, vengeance, and hate, and you can't look away. "World famous all over Oslo," Euronymous says when the band is still practicing in his parents' basement. I really liked that line.

  • May 02, 2020

    I went with 2 1/2 stars, I don't know much on this band and I know that the band was not pleased with this movie. I only seen this movie once but it kept my attention, and I would watch it again. I also hear that the movie was kind of a fib when it came to telling the story of the band, The movie has some gore in it, I didn't really know what to rate this movie. I do believe that this movie in some weird way has a moral to it. Be careful who you trust and let in your circle. The guy Varg killed his friend, and his friend said it was all talk, so he got killed for spilling tea. Interesting movie to say the least, watch the movie and decide for yourself.

    I went with 2 1/2 stars, I don't know much on this band and I know that the band was not pleased with this movie. I only seen this movie once but it kept my attention, and I would watch it again. I also hear that the movie was kind of a fib when it came to telling the story of the band, The movie has some gore in it, I didn't really know what to rate this movie. I do believe that this movie in some weird way has a moral to it. Be careful who you trust and let in your circle. The guy Varg killed his friend, and his friend said it was all talk, so he got killed for spilling tea. Interesting movie to say the least, watch the movie and decide for yourself.

  • Apr 13, 2020

    Muy buena refleja todo lo que leí en fanzines de la época

    Muy buena refleja todo lo que leí en fanzines de la época

  • Apr 06, 2020

    It is not 100% accurate, in every biopic there is a part of fiction, but it was far from being complety inaccurate either, those who claim that the movie is based on complete lies are not honest, the majors events related in the movie which make the story so "unfortunately" famous happened. The story was told from an interesting point of view and perspective, I liked the fact that the director showed them as extreme young people groing up out of the social "normality" they were asked/supposed to fit in, and who finally lost control over their image and group "pressure", instead of showing them as reckless satanic monsters. It is hard, nearly impossible, to know what they really felt or thought at the time, but the humanising point of view was interesting to me. There was a side taken of course, but in that kind of history there is aways one, some might like it, other wont, I personally did like it. Good actors and direction also.

    It is not 100% accurate, in every biopic there is a part of fiction, but it was far from being complety inaccurate either, those who claim that the movie is based on complete lies are not honest, the majors events related in the movie which make the story so "unfortunately" famous happened. The story was told from an interesting point of view and perspective, I liked the fact that the director showed them as extreme young people groing up out of the social "normality" they were asked/supposed to fit in, and who finally lost control over their image and group "pressure", instead of showing them as reckless satanic monsters. It is hard, nearly impossible, to know what they really felt or thought at the time, but the humanising point of view was interesting to me. There was a side taken of course, but in that kind of history there is aways one, some might like it, other wont, I personally did like it. Good actors and direction also.

  • Gimly M Super Reviewer
    Apr 03, 2020

    Lords of Chaos is not a Mayhem biopic. If you're looking for that, or if you're looking for a film about the rise of Black Metal in Norway, look entirely elsewhere. This is - at its surface - basically just a film about Euronymous and his relationship with Dead, and then with Varg. But it's really about "edge". About the kvlt of black metal that was arguably more vital to its identity than the actual music. About evil for evil's sake alone. This brutality that from the outside looking in is almost as cartoonish as it is despicable. I was born too late to be in the real thick of the black metal scene at its peak (and living in the Southern Hemisphere didn't help much either), but when I was coming up in the 2000s, the black metal scene might not have been thriving, but it was there, and I was a part of it. Edginess took precedence over everything else. It was a huge part of my identity, and it was the entire identity of some of the people I spent my time with. We never killed anyone, of course, but it got dark, and the music did honestly take a backseat to that edginess. Lords of Chaos does the same. The music takes a backseat. Lords of Chaos is so not about Mayhem in fact, that I honestly can't remember if Hellhammer, (garbage human, strong contender for world's best living drummer, and member of Mayhem for over 30 cumulative years) ever even actually got a line in this thing. I remember being young, and getting sick of proving myself to people whose whole idea of what made a black metal band count as "trve" enough was the fact that I'd never listened to them. Eventually, I told one such a fellow that the best black metal band in history was Twisted Sister, and then he never bothered trying to "outrank" my dedication to black metal again. What would be the point at that stage? Lords of Chaos seems to view black metal in pretty much the same way. Twisted Sister could be the best black metal band in history for all that Lords of Chaos actually displays about the subject. But after all that, you know why I still liked Lords of Chaos? Maybe some of it was just nostalgia, but for the most part, it's that there was actual characters in it. Sure the characters were, to a man, all assholes. And they may not have strongly resembled the people they were based on (except for the asshole part, that seems fair). But I was still invested in them. It wasn't just a mad rush to get from one notable point in a band's history to the next. There were people in it who interacted with each other. And that makes this the best musical biopic I've seen in years (despite not actually being one.)

    Lords of Chaos is not a Mayhem biopic. If you're looking for that, or if you're looking for a film about the rise of Black Metal in Norway, look entirely elsewhere. This is - at its surface - basically just a film about Euronymous and his relationship with Dead, and then with Varg. But it's really about "edge". About the kvlt of black metal that was arguably more vital to its identity than the actual music. About evil for evil's sake alone. This brutality that from the outside looking in is almost as cartoonish as it is despicable. I was born too late to be in the real thick of the black metal scene at its peak (and living in the Southern Hemisphere didn't help much either), but when I was coming up in the 2000s, the black metal scene might not have been thriving, but it was there, and I was a part of it. Edginess took precedence over everything else. It was a huge part of my identity, and it was the entire identity of some of the people I spent my time with. We never killed anyone, of course, but it got dark, and the music did honestly take a backseat to that edginess. Lords of Chaos does the same. The music takes a backseat. Lords of Chaos is so not about Mayhem in fact, that I honestly can't remember if Hellhammer, (garbage human, strong contender for world's best living drummer, and member of Mayhem for over 30 cumulative years) ever even actually got a line in this thing. I remember being young, and getting sick of proving myself to people whose whole idea of what made a black metal band count as "trve" enough was the fact that I'd never listened to them. Eventually, I told one such a fellow that the best black metal band in history was Twisted Sister, and then he never bothered trying to "outrank" my dedication to black metal again. What would be the point at that stage? Lords of Chaos seems to view black metal in pretty much the same way. Twisted Sister could be the best black metal band in history for all that Lords of Chaos actually displays about the subject. But after all that, you know why I still liked Lords of Chaos? Maybe some of it was just nostalgia, but for the most part, it's that there was actual characters in it. Sure the characters were, to a man, all assholes. And they may not have strongly resembled the people they were based on (except for the asshole part, that seems fair). But I was still invested in them. It wasn't just a mad rush to get from one notable point in a band's history to the next. There were people in it who interacted with each other. And that makes this the best musical biopic I've seen in years (despite not actually being one.)

  • Mar 24, 2020

    This movie really shows what taking things too far means. It's a super tragic, yet intriguing plot. I really loved this movie. I thought the actors were amazing at their roles.

    This movie really shows what taking things too far means. It's a super tragic, yet intriguing plot. I really loved this movie. I thought the actors were amazing at their roles.

  • Mar 23, 2020

    Unforgettable film!! Amazingly created, and Rory Culkin is phenomenal!!

    Unforgettable film!! Amazingly created, and Rory Culkin is phenomenal!!

  • Mar 08, 2020

    The movie is great, and maybe I learned to like more Mayhem after it went to the movies, because I didn't know the band so well. The interpretations are awesome, the scenes, the movie itself is great. I expected less from it because metal didn't have so much credits on pop culture, but I guess this movie was a complete turnaround. It just sinned on the issue of don't put in anyway Varg's version about the facts, or don't give it as many attention as it should have. But, anyway, I loved the movie, and now it's one of my favorites, haha.

    The movie is great, and maybe I learned to like more Mayhem after it went to the movies, because I didn't know the band so well. The interpretations are awesome, the scenes, the movie itself is great. I expected less from it because metal didn't have so much credits on pop culture, but I guess this movie was a complete turnaround. It just sinned on the issue of don't put in anyway Varg's version about the facts, or don't give it as many attention as it should have. But, anyway, I loved the movie, and now it's one of my favorites, haha.

  • Feb 11, 2020

    This movie is just rubbish... Really not accurate about something which really happened! A movie about Black metal but without black metal song on the ost, because no black metal band accepted to give some song to this shitty movie...

    This movie is just rubbish... Really not accurate about something which really happened! A movie about Black metal but without black metal song on the ost, because no black metal band accepted to give some song to this shitty movie...