Margot at the Wedding Reviews

  • 5d ago

    Wow the critics are fucking stupid... but that is certainly no surprise. But man, the audience seems to have their heads up their own asses too here. This is an incredible, beautiful, sad, funny, movie about the interpersonal relationship between, long-since-turned adult sisters, competitive to a fault, each unwilling to let the past go and move on with it already. THIS is a true masterpiece, and I believe history will have the final say in proving my opinion. A must watch of Baumbach's oeuvre

    Wow the critics are fucking stupid... but that is certainly no surprise. But man, the audience seems to have their heads up their own asses too here. This is an incredible, beautiful, sad, funny, movie about the interpersonal relationship between, long-since-turned adult sisters, competitive to a fault, each unwilling to let the past go and move on with it already. THIS is a true masterpiece, and I believe history will have the final say in proving my opinion. A must watch of Baumbach's oeuvre

  • Jun 09, 2020

    Please note: I see many male critics have given this a bad review because loose ends aren't tied up and there is no closure, no resolution – that doesn't make it a bad film, it just makes it realistic, a segment of a family's life.

    Please note: I see many male critics have given this a bad review because loose ends aren't tied up and there is no closure, no resolution – that doesn't make it a bad film, it just makes it realistic, a segment of a family's life.

  • Jun 11, 2019

    This is one of the most divisive movies that Noah Baumbach has ever made as people either seem to believe that it's pretentious and insufferable or that it's a worthy extension of the ideas he explored in The Squid and the Whale (2005). I think that this film is a definite step down from The Squid and the Whale but I think that it's still an interesting little film that is worth viewing even if you hate all of the characters. Characters in this film can seem aggressively inert but if you like Greenberg (2010) or parts of Mistress America (2015) then you will be on this film's wavelength. Additionally, who wouldn't want to see Nicole Kidman, Jack Black, Jennifer Jason Leigh and John Turturro together in one movie? Margot, Nicole Kidman, is successful but narcissistic writer of short stories who has been estranged from her comparatively carefree sister Pauline, Jennifer Jason Leigh, for years but the two are drawn back together on the eve of her wedding to the churlish Malcolm, Jack Black. The two sisters clash as they spend time together with long held frustrations coming to the fore and minor criticisms spiraling into giant arguments. Margot is in a relationship with Dick, Ciaran Hinds, while she splits from her understanding ex-husband Jim, John Turturro, which places strain on her relationship with both Pauline and her son Claude, Zane Pais. Both sisters experience an emotional outpouring after Margot is interrogated about her stories by Dick and eventually both sisters are able to move on. The film feels like Baumbach's Blue Jasmine (2013) in that it is also a modern update of A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). We get an unlikable fading beauty who is mentally unstable coming to stay with her poor but seemingly happy sister whose lout of a husband is oddly attractive to her as she attempts to marry a wealthy man who dumps her when he discovers who she really is, leaving her mental while her sister goes back to her husband. Obviously there are significant differences but the basic plot and a lot of the tonal elements feel like they are attempting to capture the mood and vibe of Tennessee Williams. This film does not work as well as Blue Jasmine but it still offers an entertaining spin on a great story with Baumbach's more naturalistic dialogue and love for dysfunctional families being indulged. We get scenes here that are worth savoring as verbal sparring between two very different women and odd oedipal undertones are the highlights of the movie. One scene in which Margot is goading into climbing up a tree but becomes trapped up there and needs a firefighter to help her down causing the rest of the family to mock her build the sort of uncomfortable humor that marks Baumbach as a successor to Allen. We also get to see the two sisters joke about being sexual abused by their father while lounging around in bed at night. These sort of strange, intimately personal moments are what Baumbach is best at showing and he gives the movie to space so that we feel these scenes can breathe amidst moments of intensity. The performances also deserve praise as we get Kidman in a turn reminiscent of both To Die For (1995) and Eyes Wide Shut (1999) playing a frustratingly self absorbed woman who is inevitably a victim. She is unrelenting in her awfulness as she refuses to let the character fall into being a redeemable victim of her situation, she might be mental but those around her should be able to get away from her. Leigh is wonderful as the Stella Kowalski in this film as she and Black have a pleasant chemistry that sells you on their rather unconventional relationship while her prickly deference to Kidman is seen in small moments. Black rounds out the supporting cast as he is believably disgusting as the lovable shlump but his big dramatic scene is darkly funny. The cast all get moments to shine, even the son, which shows just how far Baumbach has come. This won't be for everyone but you will probably already know if you don't like the sort of characters that Baumbach writes and if you do this will be right up your alley.

    This is one of the most divisive movies that Noah Baumbach has ever made as people either seem to believe that it's pretentious and insufferable or that it's a worthy extension of the ideas he explored in The Squid and the Whale (2005). I think that this film is a definite step down from The Squid and the Whale but I think that it's still an interesting little film that is worth viewing even if you hate all of the characters. Characters in this film can seem aggressively inert but if you like Greenberg (2010) or parts of Mistress America (2015) then you will be on this film's wavelength. Additionally, who wouldn't want to see Nicole Kidman, Jack Black, Jennifer Jason Leigh and John Turturro together in one movie? Margot, Nicole Kidman, is successful but narcissistic writer of short stories who has been estranged from her comparatively carefree sister Pauline, Jennifer Jason Leigh, for years but the two are drawn back together on the eve of her wedding to the churlish Malcolm, Jack Black. The two sisters clash as they spend time together with long held frustrations coming to the fore and minor criticisms spiraling into giant arguments. Margot is in a relationship with Dick, Ciaran Hinds, while she splits from her understanding ex-husband Jim, John Turturro, which places strain on her relationship with both Pauline and her son Claude, Zane Pais. Both sisters experience an emotional outpouring after Margot is interrogated about her stories by Dick and eventually both sisters are able to move on. The film feels like Baumbach's Blue Jasmine (2013) in that it is also a modern update of A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). We get an unlikable fading beauty who is mentally unstable coming to stay with her poor but seemingly happy sister whose lout of a husband is oddly attractive to her as she attempts to marry a wealthy man who dumps her when he discovers who she really is, leaving her mental while her sister goes back to her husband. Obviously there are significant differences but the basic plot and a lot of the tonal elements feel like they are attempting to capture the mood and vibe of Tennessee Williams. This film does not work as well as Blue Jasmine but it still offers an entertaining spin on a great story with Baumbach's more naturalistic dialogue and love for dysfunctional families being indulged. We get scenes here that are worth savoring as verbal sparring between two very different women and odd oedipal undertones are the highlights of the movie. One scene in which Margot is goading into climbing up a tree but becomes trapped up there and needs a firefighter to help her down causing the rest of the family to mock her build the sort of uncomfortable humor that marks Baumbach as a successor to Allen. We also get to see the two sisters joke about being sexual abused by their father while lounging around in bed at night. These sort of strange, intimately personal moments are what Baumbach is best at showing and he gives the movie to space so that we feel these scenes can breathe amidst moments of intensity. The performances also deserve praise as we get Kidman in a turn reminiscent of both To Die For (1995) and Eyes Wide Shut (1999) playing a frustratingly self absorbed woman who is inevitably a victim. She is unrelenting in her awfulness as she refuses to let the character fall into being a redeemable victim of her situation, she might be mental but those around her should be able to get away from her. Leigh is wonderful as the Stella Kowalski in this film as she and Black have a pleasant chemistry that sells you on their rather unconventional relationship while her prickly deference to Kidman is seen in small moments. Black rounds out the supporting cast as he is believably disgusting as the lovable shlump but his big dramatic scene is darkly funny. The cast all get moments to shine, even the son, which shows just how far Baumbach has come. This won't be for everyone but you will probably already know if you don't like the sort of characters that Baumbach writes and if you do this will be right up your alley.

  • Feb 17, 2019

    TV Edit. Horrible movie.

    TV Edit. Horrible movie.

  • Oct 27, 2018

    One of Baumbach's weakest efforts.

    One of Baumbach's weakest efforts.

  • Mar 04, 2018

    The characters weren't unbearable like I thought they were going to be but yeah they probably won't enthrall all kinds of viewers.

    The characters weren't unbearable like I thought they were going to be but yeah they probably won't enthrall all kinds of viewers.

  • Feb 10, 2018

    Boring and couldn't make head not tail of it. Why would she leave her handbag with all her money, cards and phone and run off like that? The whole thing is none credible and nothing comes together at the end. Is this meant to be arty?

    Boring and couldn't make head not tail of it. Why would she leave her handbag with all her money, cards and phone and run off like that? The whole thing is none credible and nothing comes together at the end. Is this meant to be arty?

  • Feb 01, 2018

    Noah Baumbach's mean-spirited entry of his rich people with problems franchise, which consists of practically every film he's ever made (Squid and the Whale, Greenberg, The Meyerowitz Stories, etc.) If this were a Star Wars film, it'd be Empire. This one is odd, bleak and odd, occasionally amusing, but so uncomfortably odd and ugly just for the sake of. Surprisingly the best thing about Margo at the Wedding is Jack Black, who, let's be honest, hasn't turned in a show stealing performance since High Fidelity. His darker take on buffoonery here works really well in small doses and fortunately, he is underutilized. Also, there is (while not funny) a noteworthy cameo by John Turturro that provides the movie with its only bit of humanity. As for the other 99.9% of the film, it is a repetitive, merciless competition between nasty, manic-depressive cartoon characters who take turns attacking/hurting one another with snide remarks and betrayal. For a movie with wedding in the title, this one was about as upbeat as a funeral, and regardless of whether that was the point, on screen it does not come across as a point worth making.

    Noah Baumbach's mean-spirited entry of his rich people with problems franchise, which consists of practically every film he's ever made (Squid and the Whale, Greenberg, The Meyerowitz Stories, etc.) If this were a Star Wars film, it'd be Empire. This one is odd, bleak and odd, occasionally amusing, but so uncomfortably odd and ugly just for the sake of. Surprisingly the best thing about Margo at the Wedding is Jack Black, who, let's be honest, hasn't turned in a show stealing performance since High Fidelity. His darker take on buffoonery here works really well in small doses and fortunately, he is underutilized. Also, there is (while not funny) a noteworthy cameo by John Turturro that provides the movie with its only bit of humanity. As for the other 99.9% of the film, it is a repetitive, merciless competition between nasty, manic-depressive cartoon characters who take turns attacking/hurting one another with snide remarks and betrayal. For a movie with wedding in the title, this one was about as upbeat as a funeral, and regardless of whether that was the point, on screen it does not come across as a point worth making.

  • Oct 10, 2017

    Privilege makes a movie. Too bad privilege couldn't buy Baumbach just a little talent. Baum-bastic.

    Privilege makes a movie. Too bad privilege couldn't buy Baumbach just a little talent. Baum-bastic.

  • Oct 09, 2017

    Pointless sh*t. I give an extra half star for Jennifer's extraordinary acting.

    Pointless sh*t. I give an extra half star for Jennifer's extraordinary acting.