Mélo Reviews

  • May 20, 2010

    On passe pas plusieurs etats d'esprit devant ce film : l'emerveillement, l'ennui, l'interet, la suprise,... A la fin, l'impression qui predomine est celle d'avoir vu un magnifique film.

    On passe pas plusieurs etats d'esprit devant ce film : l'emerveillement, l'ennui, l'interet, la suprise,... A la fin, l'impression qui predomine est celle d'avoir vu un magnifique film.

  • May 08, 2009

    One of the worst films I've ever seen. Boring bourgeois bastards.

    One of the worst films I've ever seen. Boring bourgeois bastards.

  • Jan 17, 2009

    It is quite impressive how this simple story holds two hour long film not long at all. By skipping the story, thus allowing people to make sense out of what is being shown, this play-alike film appeals. The scene, where the camera pans around the blurred objects, is subtle and emotional.

    It is quite impressive how this simple story holds two hour long film not long at all. By skipping the story, thus allowing people to make sense out of what is being shown, this play-alike film appeals. The scene, where the camera pans around the blurred objects, is subtle and emotional.

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Oct 16, 2008

    [font=Century Gothic]When I saw Alain Resnais' latest film, "Private Fears in Public Places" last year, I remarked that its theatricality was an aberration. After seeing his 1986 film "Melo" last night, I stand corrected. Its very staginess cannot be disguised by any amount of camera movement. [/font] [font=Century Gothic][/font] [font=Century Gothic]"Melo" is a banal melodrama set in Paris in the 1920's. Romaine(Sabine Azema) and Pierre(Pierre Arditi) are a happily married couple whose bliss is only marred by their childlessness. They are joined one evening for dinner by an old friend, Marcel(Andre Dussollier). By the time he departs, he extends an open invitation to the couple to come by and visit him to hear him play the violin. In the next scene, it is Romaine who has done so alone, initiating an affair with Marcel.[/font] [font=Century Gothic][/font] [font=Century Gothic]By the way, Marcel is something of a hypocrite, having terminated a serious relationship in the past because he jealously felt his lover was lying to him. Now, he betrays a close friend in an adulterous affair with his wife, which is by its very nature rooted in lies. [/font]

    [font=Century Gothic]When I saw Alain Resnais' latest film, "Private Fears in Public Places" last year, I remarked that its theatricality was an aberration. After seeing his 1986 film "Melo" last night, I stand corrected. Its very staginess cannot be disguised by any amount of camera movement. [/font] [font=Century Gothic][/font] [font=Century Gothic]"Melo" is a banal melodrama set in Paris in the 1920's. Romaine(Sabine Azema) and Pierre(Pierre Arditi) are a happily married couple whose bliss is only marred by their childlessness. They are joined one evening for dinner by an old friend, Marcel(Andre Dussollier). By the time he departs, he extends an open invitation to the couple to come by and visit him to hear him play the violin. In the next scene, it is Romaine who has done so alone, initiating an affair with Marcel.[/font] [font=Century Gothic][/font] [font=Century Gothic]By the way, Marcel is something of a hypocrite, having terminated a serious relationship in the past because he jealously felt his lover was lying to him. Now, he betrays a close friend in an adulterous affair with his wife, which is by its very nature rooted in lies. [/font]

  • Mar 22, 2008

    After failing to connect with a couple of Resnais' recent films, a friend suggested that "Melo" would put his current work in context. Or, if not, at least I could see how his shift to stage adaptations began. I doubt that I'll ever feel as strongly about his late period as I do about his initial foray into cinema, but this is an admirable film. That he's able to open with a 30 minute after-dinner conversation AND keep my attention speaks volumes about his attention to detail and the quality of his cast. Even though he uses a few techniques to downplay the script's inherent melodrama, I still can't comprehend why he abandoned many of his avant garde leanings for a run-of-the-mill temptress tale. Maybe it'll come into focus when I'm old and grey.

    After failing to connect with a couple of Resnais' recent films, a friend suggested that "Melo" would put his current work in context. Or, if not, at least I could see how his shift to stage adaptations began. I doubt that I'll ever feel as strongly about his late period as I do about his initial foray into cinema, but this is an admirable film. That he's able to open with a 30 minute after-dinner conversation AND keep my attention speaks volumes about his attention to detail and the quality of his cast. Even though he uses a few techniques to downplay the script's inherent melodrama, I still can't comprehend why he abandoned many of his avant garde leanings for a run-of-the-mill temptress tale. Maybe it'll come into focus when I'm old and grey.