Nuremberg Reviews

  • Aug 07, 2012

    âThe war was over but there was no peace.â? Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today is the documentary complement to the dramatic Judgment at Nuremberg. Both feature the themes of good and evil and how one can determine morality in a subjective world. The opening comments of the prosecutor in the documentary seem as certain as the fictional character in the drama. At that time and place - post-war Germany in 1945 and 1946 - it certainly seemed that those on trial must have steadfastly supported the sinister atrocities of the German Reich. Judgment at Nuremberg shows that that interpretation is not as obvious as it seems at first but Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today uses rare clips to further detail the accusations. The footage of the trials is sparse (only about thirty hours in total) but the documentary producers compiled other recordings of German life during the 1930s to supplement their film. It is haunting to see German citizens go about their lives in factories unwittingly preparing for war. It is also compelling to see the flames of World War II arise from the ashes of the World War I. Nevertheless, the idea of moral relativity remains. Some of the defendants seem so indignant that they are on trial, perhaps because they believed staunchly in their actions. Some deny that they did anything wrong, some protect Adolf Hitler, and some beg for mercy. To me, the main lesson of the Nuremberg trials is that humanity remains capable of anything. Some may find the actions horrendous but others believe that their deeds were entirely justified. It is a tall task for all global governments to protect the rights of every minority.

    âThe war was over but there was no peace.â? Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today is the documentary complement to the dramatic Judgment at Nuremberg. Both feature the themes of good and evil and how one can determine morality in a subjective world. The opening comments of the prosecutor in the documentary seem as certain as the fictional character in the drama. At that time and place - post-war Germany in 1945 and 1946 - it certainly seemed that those on trial must have steadfastly supported the sinister atrocities of the German Reich. Judgment at Nuremberg shows that that interpretation is not as obvious as it seems at first but Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today uses rare clips to further detail the accusations. The footage of the trials is sparse (only about thirty hours in total) but the documentary producers compiled other recordings of German life during the 1930s to supplement their film. It is haunting to see German citizens go about their lives in factories unwittingly preparing for war. It is also compelling to see the flames of World War II arise from the ashes of the World War I. Nevertheless, the idea of moral relativity remains. Some of the defendants seem so indignant that they are on trial, perhaps because they believed staunchly in their actions. Some deny that they did anything wrong, some protect Adolf Hitler, and some beg for mercy. To me, the main lesson of the Nuremberg trials is that humanity remains capable of anything. Some may find the actions horrendous but others believe that their deeds were entirely justified. It is a tall task for all global governments to protect the rights of every minority.

  • Jan 16, 2012

    Left me absolutely speechless. Never before seen footage of the Nuremberg trail and Nazi history. Those sick, demented fucks. I hope the World never forgets that horrific time.

    Left me absolutely speechless. Never before seen footage of the Nuremberg trail and Nazi history. Those sick, demented fucks. I hope the World never forgets that horrific time.

  • Mar 30, 2011

    Interesting as an artifact. Created by the War Department in 1948 and shown in Germany but not America, evidently because the government wanted to unite with Germany against Russia, whereas in 1945 it was the other way around. Most of the footage is extremely familiar to viewers of WWII docs, but still worth a look to see what the government view was at the time. Nicely restored with the very busy Liev Schreiber narrating.

    Interesting as an artifact. Created by the War Department in 1948 and shown in Germany but not America, evidently because the government wanted to unite with Germany against Russia, whereas in 1945 it was the other way around. Most of the footage is extremely familiar to viewers of WWII docs, but still worth a look to see what the government view was at the time. Nicely restored with the very busy Liev Schreiber narrating.

  • Mar 19, 2011

    see it tomorrow at the Charles and stay for the filmmakers daughter's talk about the trial, the suppression of the film and its restoration

    see it tomorrow at the Charles and stay for the filmmakers daughter's talk about the trial, the suppression of the film and its restoration

  • Feb 27, 2011

    I'm convinced that there are more hours of film, documentaries and stories about WWII than the duration of the war itself. There isn't a single theater, battle, speech, figure and policy that hasn't been examined ad-nausuem. For some reason it never gets totally old. Nuremberg is a very short and really not very good documentary about the trials. The reason it's not very good is because it's very short. There are probably so many details and gag inducing moments to come from those trials and we miss them all. What works for the movie is that it's very well edited, with some eye popping moments and footage that you cannot believe comes from the real world and only 60 years ago. Perhaps, in my opinion, the most jaw dropping part is how so many of the Nazi leaders had the nerve to deny or minimize what they had done. Knowing they were headed for the rope, at a minimum they should have manned up, admitted their evil and dealt with the consequences. Watching them stutter and throw Hitler & Goebbles under the bus was pathetic. In summary, Nuremberg is a decent hour+ of your time but there isn't really very much new to learn and there are plenty of opportunities missed.

    I'm convinced that there are more hours of film, documentaries and stories about WWII than the duration of the war itself. There isn't a single theater, battle, speech, figure and policy that hasn't been examined ad-nausuem. For some reason it never gets totally old. Nuremberg is a very short and really not very good documentary about the trials. The reason it's not very good is because it's very short. There are probably so many details and gag inducing moments to come from those trials and we miss them all. What works for the movie is that it's very well edited, with some eye popping moments and footage that you cannot believe comes from the real world and only 60 years ago. Perhaps, in my opinion, the most jaw dropping part is how so many of the Nazi leaders had the nerve to deny or minimize what they had done. Knowing they were headed for the rope, at a minimum they should have manned up, admitted their evil and dealt with the consequences. Watching them stutter and throw Hitler & Goebbles under the bus was pathetic. In summary, Nuremberg is a decent hour+ of your time but there isn't really very much new to learn and there are plenty of opportunities missed.

  • Jan 30, 2011

    About as interesting as the documentaries you had to watch in ninth grade history class, but at least you don't have to take notes. Seriously I did not learn anything new, or interesting, except that these guys (unlike the "POW'S" at gitmo) got a fair trial and some where found innocent, and where released. maybe that's why this is considered an important film.

    About as interesting as the documentaries you had to watch in ninth grade history class, but at least you don't have to take notes. Seriously I did not learn anything new, or interesting, except that these guys (unlike the "POW'S" at gitmo) got a fair trial and some where found innocent, and where released. maybe that's why this is considered an important film.

  • Jan 28, 2011

    This documentary isn't subtle nor is its aim. Its goal is to convince viewers of the criminal evil of Nazi Germany. It does its job by showing actual footage of the Nuremberg trials and by showing portions of Nazi films and other footage taken during and after the war, which was used as evidence during the trial. Shown in Germany in the late '40s as part of the denazification process, it has never been shown in the U.S. until now. It is well worth seeing.

    This documentary isn't subtle nor is its aim. Its goal is to convince viewers of the criminal evil of Nazi Germany. It does its job by showing actual footage of the Nuremberg trials and by showing portions of Nazi films and other footage taken during and after the war, which was used as evidence during the trial. Shown in Germany in the late '40s as part of the denazification process, it has never been shown in the U.S. until now. It is well worth seeing.