Omar Reviews

  • Oct 09, 2017

    The high wall between Israelis and Palestinians is just insurmountable. I don't see the conflicts can be resolved in the foreseeable future if there is no ideological change in the governments of both sides.

    The high wall between Israelis and Palestinians is just insurmountable. I don't see the conflicts can be resolved in the foreseeable future if there is no ideological change in the governments of both sides.

  • Oct 01, 2017

    omg the ending of this film will make you jump out of your seat. not only does Omar fall in love with the wrong girl but he is betrayed by her brother and his best friend. not once but twice. and while he serves time in jail for a crim he never commitment....he is given time because of association.

    omg the ending of this film will make you jump out of your seat. not only does Omar fall in love with the wrong girl but he is betrayed by her brother and his best friend. not once but twice. and while he serves time in jail for a crim he never commitment....he is given time because of association.

  • Jul 30, 2017

    so powerful! captivating from beginning to end

    so powerful! captivating from beginning to end

  • Mar 31, 2017

    Great film. The tension builds and builds throughout. This was very powerful and so well acted.

    Great film. The tension builds and builds throughout. This was very powerful and so well acted.

  • Feb 11, 2017

    Interesting film :) definitely worth the watch. A superb international film about betrayal and love.

    Interesting film :) definitely worth the watch. A superb international film about betrayal and love.

  • Jan 02, 2017

    Superb movie with a good story and a constantly intriguing plot. Very good performances with good direction and editing .

    Superb movie with a good story and a constantly intriguing plot. Very good performances with good direction and editing .

  • Sep 18, 2016

    is a Palestinian movie that was nominated for an Oscar for the best foreign category. A romance/drama/thriller set in the West bank. Omar a baker by day and a freedom fighter by night. This is a tale of love and betrayal. An tense gripping story that you will love.

    is a Palestinian movie that was nominated for an Oscar for the best foreign category. A romance/drama/thriller set in the West bank. Omar a baker by day and a freedom fighter by night. This is a tale of love and betrayal. An tense gripping story that you will love.

  • Aug 20, 2016

    I Guess Violence (Guns, Terror, Opression & Racist Segregation) Is Just The Norm In Parts Of The World. An Unexpected Ending Gave This An Unusual Vibe To Terrorism & War That On The News Isn't Often Telling The Entire Story. It's All Very Messed Up & This Has Been Presented Very Well In Light Of That..What An Unfortunate, But Quite Honest Look At Cultural Clashes Going For Thousands Of Years Now. Hrmmm.

    I Guess Violence (Guns, Terror, Opression & Racist Segregation) Is Just The Norm In Parts Of The World. An Unexpected Ending Gave This An Unusual Vibe To Terrorism & War That On The News Isn't Often Telling The Entire Story. It's All Very Messed Up & This Has Been Presented Very Well In Light Of That..What An Unfortunate, But Quite Honest Look At Cultural Clashes Going For Thousands Of Years Now. Hrmmm.

  • Aug 16, 2016

    Most people see films to escape. They want a couple hours of entertainment - to laugh, to cry, to watch buildings and cars get blown up... I watch films to be challenged. I want to take my mind to places and situations I never thought to go to before. This week I gave myself my ultimate movie challenge: a Palestinian film, and one made by a director whose last outing romanticised suicide bombers - the very people who want to kill my family and me. OMAR, by Israeli-born Hany Abu-Assad, tells the story of a young man from the Palestinian Territories who, along with two of his closest friends, kills an Israeli soldier. When Omar gets caught and is sent to an Israeli prison, his lawyer informs him that even though he didn't shoot the gun, he still faces the prospect of life behind bars. An Israeli secret service agent gives him a way out, though it comes with a very heavy price. Omar must become an informant for his sworn enemy and deliver his best friend - who also happens to be his girlfriend's brother - to the Israelis. Omar agrees to the terms of the release but he's not committed to fulfilling his end of the deal. Unfortunately for him, though, he is already wearing a scarlet letter. Mistrust runs high amongst the Palestinians and anyone who gets out of jail quickly is regarded with suspicion. He tells his friends he is not a snitch but they don't believe him, especially when their next plot to attack the Israelis is thwarted. Now Omar has to find out who the real informant is while trying to restore both his friends' and his girlfriend's trust in him. Omar's girlfriend suggests they move overseas but he'll hear nothing of it. Palestine is his home and until his country is free, he will never be satisfied. For Omar though, that day may never come. As he slowly uncovers who the traitor in their midst is, he tries to make things right. But it's already too late, and his own deal with the Israelis has consequences. As both a Jew and a rational-thinking human being, I have a lot of trouble with this story because it seeks to legitimise jihadism. (Director Abu-Assad has said that he, too, would be a jihadist if he would be living in the Palestinian Territories. He currently lives in the Netherlands.) The reality is that just five kilometers from the separation barrier that tries to keep people like Omar and his murderous friends out of Israel, Arabs are living in peaceful coexistence with their Jewish neighbours. The fact that Abu-Assad can even make a film like OMAR in Israel (it was primarily shot in Nazareth) says something about Israel's commitment to peace. He should try making a film that is critical of the Chinese government in China or even the Saudi government in Saudi Arabia. He wouldn't live long enough to see it finished. As a film critic though, I do appreciate the film's artistry. The acting is solid, as is the direction and the editing. I didn't find the ending surprising, as so many other critics did. To me, it was the logical conclusion.

    Most people see films to escape. They want a couple hours of entertainment - to laugh, to cry, to watch buildings and cars get blown up... I watch films to be challenged. I want to take my mind to places and situations I never thought to go to before. This week I gave myself my ultimate movie challenge: a Palestinian film, and one made by a director whose last outing romanticised suicide bombers - the very people who want to kill my family and me. OMAR, by Israeli-born Hany Abu-Assad, tells the story of a young man from the Palestinian Territories who, along with two of his closest friends, kills an Israeli soldier. When Omar gets caught and is sent to an Israeli prison, his lawyer informs him that even though he didn't shoot the gun, he still faces the prospect of life behind bars. An Israeli secret service agent gives him a way out, though it comes with a very heavy price. Omar must become an informant for his sworn enemy and deliver his best friend - who also happens to be his girlfriend's brother - to the Israelis. Omar agrees to the terms of the release but he's not committed to fulfilling his end of the deal. Unfortunately for him, though, he is already wearing a scarlet letter. Mistrust runs high amongst the Palestinians and anyone who gets out of jail quickly is regarded with suspicion. He tells his friends he is not a snitch but they don't believe him, especially when their next plot to attack the Israelis is thwarted. Now Omar has to find out who the real informant is while trying to restore both his friends' and his girlfriend's trust in him. Omar's girlfriend suggests they move overseas but he'll hear nothing of it. Palestine is his home and until his country is free, he will never be satisfied. For Omar though, that day may never come. As he slowly uncovers who the traitor in their midst is, he tries to make things right. But it's already too late, and his own deal with the Israelis has consequences. As both a Jew and a rational-thinking human being, I have a lot of trouble with this story because it seeks to legitimise jihadism. (Director Abu-Assad has said that he, too, would be a jihadist if he would be living in the Palestinian Territories. He currently lives in the Netherlands.) The reality is that just five kilometers from the separation barrier that tries to keep people like Omar and his murderous friends out of Israel, Arabs are living in peaceful coexistence with their Jewish neighbours. The fact that Abu-Assad can even make a film like OMAR in Israel (it was primarily shot in Nazareth) says something about Israel's commitment to peace. He should try making a film that is critical of the Chinese government in China or even the Saudi government in Saudi Arabia. He wouldn't live long enough to see it finished. As a film critic though, I do appreciate the film's artistry. The acting is solid, as is the direction and the editing. I didn't find the ending surprising, as so many other critics did. To me, it was the logical conclusion.

  • Mar 22, 2016

    New coming actor Adam Bakri plays the title character Omar, who wishes and proclaims to be a freedom fighter in the West Bank. He climbs the walls often to visit friends, and even secretly dates his best friend's sister. This had the makings of a melodrama, which I supposed should be interpreted, because I know this is a melodramatic beauty. The story had a mixed message I personally feel. There was a lot of unanswered questions and usually that leaves room for thought. The movie was thought provoking considering we're watching torture and conflict. I was so unsure who was fighting who that I understood that I only needed Omar to be ok for the story to make sense. Director Any-Abu Assad (Paradise Now) concludes "Omar" in the same manner as "Chinatown" or "No Country For Old Men" with the message, but I feel there's more hope than the latter movies had. I cheered for Omar because I didn't find it weird that he took something like honor and loyalty to heart, so much, rather, I could see he took someone like his love Nadia to heart.

    New coming actor Adam Bakri plays the title character Omar, who wishes and proclaims to be a freedom fighter in the West Bank. He climbs the walls often to visit friends, and even secretly dates his best friend's sister. This had the makings of a melodrama, which I supposed should be interpreted, because I know this is a melodramatic beauty. The story had a mixed message I personally feel. There was a lot of unanswered questions and usually that leaves room for thought. The movie was thought provoking considering we're watching torture and conflict. I was so unsure who was fighting who that I understood that I only needed Omar to be ok for the story to make sense. Director Any-Abu Assad (Paradise Now) concludes "Omar" in the same manner as "Chinatown" or "No Country For Old Men" with the message, but I feel there's more hope than the latter movies had. I cheered for Omar because I didn't find it weird that he took something like honor and loyalty to heart, so much, rather, I could see he took someone like his love Nadia to heart.