One Child Nation Reviews

  • Feb 08, 2020

    Informative and heartfelt, but it doesn't really chronicle as compelling of a story as most of my favorite documentaries. This felt a little like homework.

    Informative and heartfelt, but it doesn't really chronicle as compelling of a story as most of my favorite documentaries. This felt a little like homework.

  • Jan 30, 2020

    Absolutely heart breaking but necessary to be told in order for something like this to never happen again.

    Absolutely heart breaking but necessary to be told in order for something like this to never happen again.

  • Jan 28, 2020

    'One Child Nation' is a wide-reaching American documentary film directed by Nanfu Wang and Jialing Zhang about the fallout of China's one-child policy that lasted from 1979 to 2015. It's illuminating and eye-opening and could change your mind on certain things while disgusting you at the same time. No matter what your information level is on this subject, it's a great lesson to not believe everything the government tells you because they just could ruin the species. Things are almost always done in someone's self-interest and while the filmmaker doesn't connect the dots in this case the self-interest lies in rich Chinese men. There is no way to change the irreparable harm that's been done, but watching this rather large subject being consolidated to less than 90 minutes is a good start. There's no one person portrayed that I felt connected to, but I did feel a symbiosis with the subject matter overall. While there are disturbing images that may even go to far, it's another great doc in a year filled with them. Final Score: 8.7/10

    'One Child Nation' is a wide-reaching American documentary film directed by Nanfu Wang and Jialing Zhang about the fallout of China's one-child policy that lasted from 1979 to 2015. It's illuminating and eye-opening and could change your mind on certain things while disgusting you at the same time. No matter what your information level is on this subject, it's a great lesson to not believe everything the government tells you because they just could ruin the species. Things are almost always done in someone's self-interest and while the filmmaker doesn't connect the dots in this case the self-interest lies in rich Chinese men. There is no way to change the irreparable harm that's been done, but watching this rather large subject being consolidated to less than 90 minutes is a good start. There's no one person portrayed that I felt connected to, but I did feel a symbiosis with the subject matter overall. While there are disturbing images that may even go to far, it's another great doc in a year filled with them. Final Score: 8.7/10

  • Jan 25, 2020

    Must watch. Amazing the corruption in China.

    Must watch. Amazing the corruption in China.

  • Jan 24, 2020

    Powerful. Should be required viewing in all high schools.

    Powerful. Should be required viewing in all high schools.

  • Jan 20, 2020

    Completely shocking for me. Such a profound topic that has been so muddled by the Chinese govt. IMO, to ever compare an undertaking to the Holocaust, it better be spot-on in devastation and horror. 38 million babies were killed because of the one child policy and the Chinese Govt is proud of it! Unreal. Will shake you to your core.

    Completely shocking for me. Such a profound topic that has been so muddled by the Chinese govt. IMO, to ever compare an undertaking to the Holocaust, it better be spot-on in devastation and horror. 38 million babies were killed because of the one child policy and the Chinese Govt is proud of it! Unreal. Will shake you to your core.

  • Jan 15, 2020

    Great for the info wish is included more and more personal information

    Great for the info wish is included more and more personal information

  • Jan 15, 2020

    Heartbreaking. But what makes this documentary worth watching is the perspective of the young journalist/historian/filmmaker, who -- while not adopted -- tells the story of China's one-child policy through her own late-awakening to the brutal events that were taking place around her when she was a child and oblivious to them. She seems to have achieved her perspective in part by leaving her homeland and in part through honest questioning and research. The film is very hard to watch when they're talking about the forced "abortions" imposed by the government, as these were candidly described by all as induced live births, after which the infants were murdered. The Western World's understanding of the term abortion does not seem accurate here (though it does align with the exaggerated view "Pro-Lifers" use to describe all abortions). Also hard was watching how the government subjected women to forced sterilization. I do not recall any mention of birth control, but it was on my mind the entire time. I was near tears throughout the documentary, as the best that the babies born of unauthorized pregnancies could hope for was abandonment, which offered the initially slim possibility of being snatched up by people referred to as human traffickers, who "sold" the babies to orphanages, which in term sold them to international adoptive parents. Oddly, they struck me as the heroes here, even though they were later imprisoned in China. The presentation -- particularly with all of the photos of the "found" infants -- leaves me feeling like this was an internal genocide. This started in the mid-1970s, so birth control was available ... I am stunned that the Chinese government didn't make use of that, rather than these other barbarous strategies. If you're interested in this period in China, I would say start here, then find more to read, as the perspective begs for some balance, if it exists.

    Heartbreaking. But what makes this documentary worth watching is the perspective of the young journalist/historian/filmmaker, who -- while not adopted -- tells the story of China's one-child policy through her own late-awakening to the brutal events that were taking place around her when she was a child and oblivious to them. She seems to have achieved her perspective in part by leaving her homeland and in part through honest questioning and research. The film is very hard to watch when they're talking about the forced "abortions" imposed by the government, as these were candidly described by all as induced live births, after which the infants were murdered. The Western World's understanding of the term abortion does not seem accurate here (though it does align with the exaggerated view "Pro-Lifers" use to describe all abortions). Also hard was watching how the government subjected women to forced sterilization. I do not recall any mention of birth control, but it was on my mind the entire time. I was near tears throughout the documentary, as the best that the babies born of unauthorized pregnancies could hope for was abandonment, which offered the initially slim possibility of being snatched up by people referred to as human traffickers, who "sold" the babies to orphanages, which in term sold them to international adoptive parents. Oddly, they struck me as the heroes here, even though they were later imprisoned in China. The presentation -- particularly with all of the photos of the "found" infants -- leaves me feeling like this was an internal genocide. This started in the mid-1970s, so birth control was available ... I am stunned that the Chinese government didn't make use of that, rather than these other barbarous strategies. If you're interested in this period in China, I would say start here, then find more to read, as the perspective begs for some balance, if it exists.

  • Jan 09, 2020

    Dark times. So this is about a woman named Nanfu Wang. She has recently become a mother and wants to learn about her family history. She was born during the one-child policy in China, so there is a lot of information to unpack. Now I knew that this policy existed, but I didn't know all the ins and outs, and I certainly didn't know the extent of just how many people this affected both directly and indirectly. When I heard a stellar review for this, I added it to my watchlist, and when I saw it available on Amazon Prime, I prioritized it. This is a really heavy subject matter, but it is something that really needs to be seen by as wide of an audience as possible. I learned a lot from this movie, and my biggest takeaway I have from this is that there is no easy solution for this problem. The policy is super messed up, and given that households either got destroyed or fined out of existence if disobedient, the retaliation becomes all the more drastic. The mindset of the people in this country is that you need a son to carry on the family name, so if you happen to give birth to a daughter, there's a high chance she's going to end up abandoned at a marketplace or on the side of the road so the parents can still have a free slot for a son. The lucky unwanted babies find their way to an orphanage, which is a whole different can of worms. Human trafficking is universally considered to be a horrible thing, right? Well, what if you're saving a baby from certain death to get adopted overseas? It's not such a black and white question anymore, and you get to hear different sides of the argument. You hear from people who think this policy is a governmental crime, and then you have people who understand the other side of the coin. Studies showed that if there was no cap on family members, then starvation is sure to run rampant. So what can you do? I get it if you don't have the stomach for this, as this is as heartbreaking of a subject matter that you're going to see on screen. You really should give it a go if at all possible from a historical standpoint. This movie does not sugarcoat how much propaganda the Chinese government uses in their practices, so it is very clear that they are going to try to blink this blemish on their culture out of existence. If you don't remember the past, you're bound to repeat it, which is what makes this documentary so important. One Child Nation is complex and powerful, and I give it a high recommendation.

    Dark times. So this is about a woman named Nanfu Wang. She has recently become a mother and wants to learn about her family history. She was born during the one-child policy in China, so there is a lot of information to unpack. Now I knew that this policy existed, but I didn't know all the ins and outs, and I certainly didn't know the extent of just how many people this affected both directly and indirectly. When I heard a stellar review for this, I added it to my watchlist, and when I saw it available on Amazon Prime, I prioritized it. This is a really heavy subject matter, but it is something that really needs to be seen by as wide of an audience as possible. I learned a lot from this movie, and my biggest takeaway I have from this is that there is no easy solution for this problem. The policy is super messed up, and given that households either got destroyed or fined out of existence if disobedient, the retaliation becomes all the more drastic. The mindset of the people in this country is that you need a son to carry on the family name, so if you happen to give birth to a daughter, there's a high chance she's going to end up abandoned at a marketplace or on the side of the road so the parents can still have a free slot for a son. The lucky unwanted babies find their way to an orphanage, which is a whole different can of worms. Human trafficking is universally considered to be a horrible thing, right? Well, what if you're saving a baby from certain death to get adopted overseas? It's not such a black and white question anymore, and you get to hear different sides of the argument. You hear from people who think this policy is a governmental crime, and then you have people who understand the other side of the coin. Studies showed that if there was no cap on family members, then starvation is sure to run rampant. So what can you do? I get it if you don't have the stomach for this, as this is as heartbreaking of a subject matter that you're going to see on screen. You really should give it a go if at all possible from a historical standpoint. This movie does not sugarcoat how much propaganda the Chinese government uses in their practices, so it is very clear that they are going to try to blink this blemish on their culture out of existence. If you don't remember the past, you're bound to repeat it, which is what makes this documentary so important. One Child Nation is complex and powerful, and I give it a high recommendation.

  • Jan 09, 2020

    Very well done doco with a personal twist on China's long-lasting One Child Policy. The horrors committed, the feeling of powerlessness of the perpetrators, the corruption of the system, the immense amount of propaganda, the stifling of dissent, ... are all portrayed here from a very personal point of view.

    Very well done doco with a personal twist on China's long-lasting One Child Policy. The horrors committed, the feeling of powerlessness of the perpetrators, the corruption of the system, the immense amount of propaganda, the stifling of dissent, ... are all portrayed here from a very personal point of view.