Rage in Heaven Reviews

  • Aug 28, 2012

    good melodrama and early berman

    good melodrama and early berman

  • May 14, 2010

    (First and only viewing - 5/14/2010)

    (First and only viewing - 5/14/2010)

  • Oct 29, 2009

    This film is a somewhat overheated little film noir. Montgomery apparently did not want to make the film and so decided not to act, only reading his lines. As a result, his character is a rather dull concoction, generally unlikable, and obviously unstable. Why either Stella or Ward are so dedicated to him is beyond me. Juxtaposing his woodenness to Ingrid Bergman's passion and Sanders's charm, the film actually comes off quite well. It picks up in the last twenty-five minutes. The most affecting scenes belong to the two actors who actually gave a damn and tried to give performances. Montgomery tends to bore me anyways, so it's no wonder that as the relationship between Stella and Ward grows, his character recedes. Sanders and Bergman really are the reason to watch this. Sanders is an incredibly likable, honest fellow, dedicated and pained by his love for his best friend's wife. He really was a better actor than many of his roles suggest. Shame he never really got a chance to give a great dramatic performance, relegated as he was to leading man status in B programmers, or villainous/secondary status in A pictures. Damn, George Sanders was a good looking young man! Bergman, as usual, is simply lovely. Her turn from Phillip to Ward is completely understandable, essentially the movement from a mother-like dedication to a disturbed man to honest love with a good man. There's something in the love triangle that has it's roots in masculine dialectic, from the 'sick', almost feminized love of Phillip to the true, masculinized love of Ward. Not a surprising film, or a great one, but has some tense moments and excellent performances by two out of three exceptional actors.

    This film is a somewhat overheated little film noir. Montgomery apparently did not want to make the film and so decided not to act, only reading his lines. As a result, his character is a rather dull concoction, generally unlikable, and obviously unstable. Why either Stella or Ward are so dedicated to him is beyond me. Juxtaposing his woodenness to Ingrid Bergman's passion and Sanders's charm, the film actually comes off quite well. It picks up in the last twenty-five minutes. The most affecting scenes belong to the two actors who actually gave a damn and tried to give performances. Montgomery tends to bore me anyways, so it's no wonder that as the relationship between Stella and Ward grows, his character recedes. Sanders and Bergman really are the reason to watch this. Sanders is an incredibly likable, honest fellow, dedicated and pained by his love for his best friend's wife. He really was a better actor than many of his roles suggest. Shame he never really got a chance to give a great dramatic performance, relegated as he was to leading man status in B programmers, or villainous/secondary status in A pictures. Damn, George Sanders was a good looking young man! Bergman, as usual, is simply lovely. Her turn from Phillip to Ward is completely understandable, essentially the movement from a mother-like dedication to a disturbed man to honest love with a good man. There's something in the love triangle that has it's roots in masculine dialectic, from the 'sick', almost feminized love of Phillip to the true, masculinized love of Ward. Not a surprising film, or a great one, but has some tense moments and excellent performances by two out of three exceptional actors.

  • May 13, 2009

    I really like this film a lot. I always forget how much until I put it in the VCR. It's not a great movie, but it has a pretty original premise for a thriller at the time, and it's kind of amazing that it was made during such strict code enforcement. Montgomery, who didn't want to do to movie in the first place, decided he wasn't even going to try. Well, if this is him not trying, then I guess it's proof of what an amazing actor he really was, because it's still a really good and eerie performance.

    I really like this film a lot. I always forget how much until I put it in the VCR. It's not a great movie, but it has a pretty original premise for a thriller at the time, and it's kind of amazing that it was made during such strict code enforcement. Montgomery, who didn't want to do to movie in the first place, decided he wasn't even going to try. Well, if this is him not trying, then I guess it's proof of what an amazing actor he really was, because it's still a really good and eerie performance.

  • Dec 18, 2008

    Ingrid Bergman is about the only thing this movie has going for it; her performance actually had some life to it. Montgomery had no depth of character at all, and there was no chemistry between Sanders and Bergman.

    Ingrid Bergman is about the only thing this movie has going for it; her performance actually had some life to it. Montgomery had no depth of character at all, and there was no chemistry between Sanders and Bergman.