Reflections in a Golden Eye Reviews

  • Oct 26, 2020

    This film is not perfect for execution drama and maybe It isn´t similar like the original book but when I see Marlon Brando like a gay who probably he was and Elisabeth Taylor making her own real life drinking and doing herself actions after filming Cleopatra I think I´ve seen on the screen something better than the real life. P.S: Sorry about my english

    This film is not perfect for execution drama and maybe It isn´t similar like the original book but when I see Marlon Brando like a gay who probably he was and Elisabeth Taylor making her own real life drinking and doing herself actions after filming Cleopatra I think I´ve seen on the screen something better than the real life. P.S: Sorry about my english

  • Sep 01, 2020

    A drama that depressed and seemed to try to force scandal in a place that doesn't matter. Contrived.

    A drama that depressed and seemed to try to force scandal in a place that doesn't matter. Contrived.

  • Feb 12, 2020

    A financial flop praised by Ebert, Reflections in a Golden Eye is a stagnant drama of affairs featuring a sexually repressed military leader played by Marlon Brando and his sexually promiscuous wife played by Liz Taylor. The main theme is repression and it's over-symbolized through horseback riding and comically obvious innuendos. When Taylor's Leonora is feeling overwhelmed, taking the horse out and "riding herself" is the only thing that helps. She even literally takes the horse out as cover for her affair with Brian Keith's Lt. Col. Langdon. Langdon has the most palatable storyline in my opinion. His wife Alison (Julie Harris) lost attraction to him after he was unable to comfort her when they lost their baby in childbirth before the film begins. This storyline handles the idea of repression with lovely nuances. We see Alison develop an affinity for Anacleto (Zorro David) whose feminine and joyful personality is in direct contrast to her husband's traditional masculinity. In another layed plot point, the Lt. Col. comes home looking for affection after witnessing Leonora's violent revenge taken on Brando's Maj. Penderton. I found this to be a much more believable and creative expression of sexual frustration than the overused (and obvious) symbolism of Pvt. Williams riding bareback buck naked through the forest while Maj. Penderton's homosexual repression causes him to stare like Homer Simpson eyeing a donut. The symbol makes sense, but after the first scene it was understood. After the 4th/5th, it was a joke. Best not to beat a dead horse, Mr. Huston... Leonora doesn't like it when you beat horses. Ultimately if you want to watch a movie about sexual repression there's much more creative, more engrossing, and more entertaining options out there. Hell, 40-Year-Old Virgin has more nuanced symbolism.

    A financial flop praised by Ebert, Reflections in a Golden Eye is a stagnant drama of affairs featuring a sexually repressed military leader played by Marlon Brando and his sexually promiscuous wife played by Liz Taylor. The main theme is repression and it's over-symbolized through horseback riding and comically obvious innuendos. When Taylor's Leonora is feeling overwhelmed, taking the horse out and "riding herself" is the only thing that helps. She even literally takes the horse out as cover for her affair with Brian Keith's Lt. Col. Langdon. Langdon has the most palatable storyline in my opinion. His wife Alison (Julie Harris) lost attraction to him after he was unable to comfort her when they lost their baby in childbirth before the film begins. This storyline handles the idea of repression with lovely nuances. We see Alison develop an affinity for Anacleto (Zorro David) whose feminine and joyful personality is in direct contrast to her husband's traditional masculinity. In another layed plot point, the Lt. Col. comes home looking for affection after witnessing Leonora's violent revenge taken on Brando's Maj. Penderton. I found this to be a much more believable and creative expression of sexual frustration than the overused (and obvious) symbolism of Pvt. Williams riding bareback buck naked through the forest while Maj. Penderton's homosexual repression causes him to stare like Homer Simpson eyeing a donut. The symbol makes sense, but after the first scene it was understood. After the 4th/5th, it was a joke. Best not to beat a dead horse, Mr. Huston... Leonora doesn't like it when you beat horses. Ultimately if you want to watch a movie about sexual repression there's much more creative, more engrossing, and more entertaining options out there. Hell, 40-Year-Old Virgin has more nuanced symbolism.

  • Aug 04, 2019

    See the full-color print of this film. The yellow and purple original release is hard on the eyes and serves no purpose other than to make you frustrated. Read the novel or a good synopsis of the plot first as well. This will make all the "silences" of the movie, in which you are supposed to make sense of everything, make sense.

    See the full-color print of this film. The yellow and purple original release is hard on the eyes and serves no purpose other than to make you frustrated. Read the novel or a good synopsis of the plot first as well. This will make all the "silences" of the movie, in which you are supposed to make sense of everything, make sense.

  • Aug 04, 2019

    The performances are all first rate, even Brian Keith's. So is the direction. Nonetheless, I think this movie was a bit more than 1960s' audiences could comfortably grasp. I think it is a bit more than today's audiences want or can understand.

    The performances are all first rate, even Brian Keith's. So is the direction. Nonetheless, I think this movie was a bit more than 1960s' audiences could comfortably grasp. I think it is a bit more than today's audiences want or can understand.

  • Jun 17, 2018

    Somewhat a good idea but after everything was said and done, a great cast...wasted.

    Somewhat a good idea but after everything was said and done, a great cast...wasted.

  • Mar 19, 2018

    The tale of several malcontent, unusual types on a modern (at the time) cavalry base - complete with horses! The only normal couple (Keith & Taylor) are married yet having an affair with each other, friends with benefits. The other 5 main characters have friendships only within a narrow scope of interaction - making them misfits of a type. This makes it difficult to understand the motivations or actions of the others. Excellent direction, editing, casting, cinematography. The film allows us just enough insight to understand how little each of the others actually comprehends. A bit like life.

    The tale of several malcontent, unusual types on a modern (at the time) cavalry base - complete with horses! The only normal couple (Keith & Taylor) are married yet having an affair with each other, friends with benefits. The other 5 main characters have friendships only within a narrow scope of interaction - making them misfits of a type. This makes it difficult to understand the motivations or actions of the others. Excellent direction, editing, casting, cinematography. The film allows us just enough insight to understand how little each of the others actually comprehends. A bit like life.

  • Dec 24, 2017

    The one minus in this movie is the slight overemotional intention of the director, which at times diminishes the incisiveness of the plot and contradicts the nuanced central performances by Marlon Brando and Elizabeth Taylor (the repression translates to his body language and she manages to hold her own). More relevant than it was fashionable to admit at the time of its release but today can be easily read as an intriguing foray into the destructive effects of social conventions.

    The one minus in this movie is the slight overemotional intention of the director, which at times diminishes the incisiveness of the plot and contradicts the nuanced central performances by Marlon Brando and Elizabeth Taylor (the repression translates to his body language and she manages to hold her own). More relevant than it was fashionable to admit at the time of its release but today can be easily read as an intriguing foray into the destructive effects of social conventions.

  • Jul 23, 2017

    Huston makes one of his most socially sensitive works that is even more relevant today with Reflections in a Golden Eye. When the characters aren't silently pondering, letting us interpret their feelings, they are in situations where they say bizarre things and act outlandishly. It makes you think of every detail which are abundant with Huston's direction and a great cast especially Marlon Brando in one of his most under appreciated roles as Major Welden Penderton a man haunted by his sexuality. The unique golden hue adds another mystery to the film and deeps ones fascination making this film all in all a great artistic contribution.

    Huston makes one of his most socially sensitive works that is even more relevant today with Reflections in a Golden Eye. When the characters aren't silently pondering, letting us interpret their feelings, they are in situations where they say bizarre things and act outlandishly. It makes you think of every detail which are abundant with Huston's direction and a great cast especially Marlon Brando in one of his most under appreciated roles as Major Welden Penderton a man haunted by his sexuality. The unique golden hue adds another mystery to the film and deeps ones fascination making this film all in all a great artistic contribution.

  • Jul 23, 2017

    Weird but has enough allure, particularly from the odd performance by Brando.

    Weird but has enough allure, particularly from the odd performance by Brando.