Rising Sun Reviews

  • Jun 23, 2019

    Ai tempi poteva essere anche accettabile...

    Ai tempi poteva essere anche accettabile...

  • Dec 23, 2018

    Interesting plot and characterizations marred by pervasive gutter-mouth swearing and overdone nudity/sex scenes.

    Interesting plot and characterizations marred by pervasive gutter-mouth swearing and overdone nudity/sex scenes.

  • Feb 08, 2018

    An entertaining film due in large part to Sean Connery. Nothing new here but worth a watch for Connery fans.

    An entertaining film due in large part to Sean Connery. Nothing new here but worth a watch for Connery fans.

  • Sep 09, 2017

    Writer Michael Crichton wrote the part of Captain Connor with Sean Connery in mind and Connery absolutely shines in the role. Connery plays a police detective with an expertise in Japanese culture who's called in to assist on a murder case that took place at an LA high rise owned by a Japanese multinational corporation. Connery is partnered with a very American of detective, Wesley Snipes, which unfortunately gives the film a disappointingly conventional buddy-cop-film vibe that was wisely absent from Crichton's novel. Crichton (a film director himself) and "Rising Sun" director Philip Kaufman reportedly clashed over changes to the script Kaufman made regarding making Connor's partner black, which I'll side with Kaufman that it added an interesting new element in this clash of cultures murder mystery, but I'll side with Crichton in that it was badly done. The scene where Snipes take Connery to a black neighborhood and Captain Connor suddenly becomes the most uncomfortable whitest white person of all time, seemingly to have forgotten all his skills and control previously demonstrated up to that point. This could have been an interesting scene if it was done in a more subtle manner, but Connor is suddenly becoming a buffoon seemed out of place. It's as if Sherlock Holmes for a few scenes became Inspector Clouseau. I'll also side with Crichton on the change of murderer at the end of the film, which seemed completely unnecessary and also went against much of what the book and film had to say about the nature of culture and culture clashes. Despite these deficiencies, there is much to enjoy. Connery has one of the best roles of his career (minus the Inspector Clouseau scenes). Director Phillips Kaufman bring style and atmosphere, crafting a slick modern day noir, while also bringing a surprising amount of sensuality to a mainstream film, rivaling his more arthouse of features like "Henry & June" and "The Unbearable Lightness of Being." Director of photography Michael Chapman also gets kudos for his moody photography. The film also features a strong supporting cast that includes Harvey Keitel, Kevin Anderson, Mako, Ray Wise, Stan Shaw, Tia Carrere, and Steve Buscemi. Overall, despite it's deficiencies, this is a stylish mystery that borders on erotic thriller and is centers around an interesting (though not so subtle) subtext about culture.

    Writer Michael Crichton wrote the part of Captain Connor with Sean Connery in mind and Connery absolutely shines in the role. Connery plays a police detective with an expertise in Japanese culture who's called in to assist on a murder case that took place at an LA high rise owned by a Japanese multinational corporation. Connery is partnered with a very American of detective, Wesley Snipes, which unfortunately gives the film a disappointingly conventional buddy-cop-film vibe that was wisely absent from Crichton's novel. Crichton (a film director himself) and "Rising Sun" director Philip Kaufman reportedly clashed over changes to the script Kaufman made regarding making Connor's partner black, which I'll side with Kaufman that it added an interesting new element in this clash of cultures murder mystery, but I'll side with Crichton in that it was badly done. The scene where Snipes take Connery to a black neighborhood and Captain Connor suddenly becomes the most uncomfortable whitest white person of all time, seemingly to have forgotten all his skills and control previously demonstrated up to that point. This could have been an interesting scene if it was done in a more subtle manner, but Connor is suddenly becoming a buffoon seemed out of place. It's as if Sherlock Holmes for a few scenes became Inspector Clouseau. I'll also side with Crichton on the change of murderer at the end of the film, which seemed completely unnecessary and also went against much of what the book and film had to say about the nature of culture and culture clashes. Despite these deficiencies, there is much to enjoy. Connery has one of the best roles of his career (minus the Inspector Clouseau scenes). Director Phillips Kaufman bring style and atmosphere, crafting a slick modern day noir, while also bringing a surprising amount of sensuality to a mainstream film, rivaling his more arthouse of features like "Henry & June" and "The Unbearable Lightness of Being." Director of photography Michael Chapman also gets kudos for his moody photography. The film also features a strong supporting cast that includes Harvey Keitel, Kevin Anderson, Mako, Ray Wise, Stan Shaw, Tia Carrere, and Steve Buscemi. Overall, despite it's deficiencies, this is a stylish mystery that borders on erotic thriller and is centers around an interesting (though not so subtle) subtext about culture.

  • Sep 08, 2017

    Great chemistry between Wesley & Sean...never seen a Sean and/or Wesley movie I didn't like.

    Great chemistry between Wesley & Sean...never seen a Sean and/or Wesley movie I didn't like.

  • Aug 13, 2017

    What the fuck. No. To everything. Especially Sean Connery. Why was he ever considered cool? With lines like "Hay is for horses" he sounds like a dad.

    What the fuck. No. To everything. Especially Sean Connery. Why was he ever considered cool? With lines like "Hay is for horses" he sounds like a dad.

  • Aug 02, 2017

    Didn't rewatch so fudging the rating, had the VHS

    Didn't rewatch so fudging the rating, had the VHS

  • Jun 02, 2017

    Decent modern noir. The mystery is kept twisting through different turns, and there are some unique characters and interactions, but ultimately the sum is not equal to its parts, as the movie isn't as riveting as it should be...

    Decent modern noir. The mystery is kept twisting through different turns, and there are some unique characters and interactions, but ultimately the sum is not equal to its parts, as the movie isn't as riveting as it should be...

  • Apr 12, 2017

    Movie about two cops who try to solve a Japanese murder. Tries to be a culture clash movie, but fails miserably. Sean Connery can't save this dud.

    Movie about two cops who try to solve a Japanese murder. Tries to be a culture clash movie, but fails miserably. Sean Connery can't save this dud.

  • Jan 23, 2017

    During a party at the United States offices of a Japanese corporation in Los Angeles, a professional escort named Cheryl Lynn Austin (Tatjana Patitz) is found dead, apparently after a violent sexual encounter. Police Detectives Web Smith (Wesley Snipes) and John Connor (Sean Connery), a former police captain and expert on Japanese affairs, are sent to act as liaison between the Japanese executives and the investigating officer, Smith's former partner Tom Graham (Harvey Keitel). During the initial investigation, Smith believes the evidence indicates a sexual encounter and murder; however, Connor insists a deeper involvement by the corporation exists. After a grueling investigation, Connor receives a disc which contains the surveillance footage from the night of the murder. This later turns out to be a digitally altered video of the actual murder. The alteration implicates Eddie Sakamura, who is the son of a wealthy Japanese businessman and a longtime friend of Connor... "Rising Sun" is such a 90s thriller with the same vibe, visual approach and predictability as in "Sliver" which handled voyeurism/surveillance as well. I have never red the book, but as far as I understand from other reviewers the Chrichton book is quite different from the Kaufman film. We have seen similiar plots, but better handled and with "Rising Sun" you don´t really care that much about who did the murder or why. There´s no real entertainment value or excitement. The John Conner role for Sean Connery fits him in certain ways, at the same time he floats around like some superior stereotypical Sherlock Holmes type with a full understanding of the Japanese culture which he is quick to point out. Wesley Snipes is as one dimensional as ever and doing yet another action anti-hero with a short temper and a quick trigger finger. Put them together and not that much happens except that Kaufman is trying to play with their cultural differences and characters on a very amateurish level. Harvey Keitel and Ray Wise are doing what they can, while Tia Carrere´s Jingo is such a terrible put together character and Steve Buscemi is as lost as he was in "Escape from L.A.". My treat in "Rising Sun" was to see the beautiful supermodel Tatjana Patitz as she was raised in the southern part of Sweden were I´m from. Not much else was any sort of treat in "Rising Sun".

    During a party at the United States offices of a Japanese corporation in Los Angeles, a professional escort named Cheryl Lynn Austin (Tatjana Patitz) is found dead, apparently after a violent sexual encounter. Police Detectives Web Smith (Wesley Snipes) and John Connor (Sean Connery), a former police captain and expert on Japanese affairs, are sent to act as liaison between the Japanese executives and the investigating officer, Smith's former partner Tom Graham (Harvey Keitel). During the initial investigation, Smith believes the evidence indicates a sexual encounter and murder; however, Connor insists a deeper involvement by the corporation exists. After a grueling investigation, Connor receives a disc which contains the surveillance footage from the night of the murder. This later turns out to be a digitally altered video of the actual murder. The alteration implicates Eddie Sakamura, who is the son of a wealthy Japanese businessman and a longtime friend of Connor... "Rising Sun" is such a 90s thriller with the same vibe, visual approach and predictability as in "Sliver" which handled voyeurism/surveillance as well. I have never red the book, but as far as I understand from other reviewers the Chrichton book is quite different from the Kaufman film. We have seen similiar plots, but better handled and with "Rising Sun" you don´t really care that much about who did the murder or why. There´s no real entertainment value or excitement. The John Conner role for Sean Connery fits him in certain ways, at the same time he floats around like some superior stereotypical Sherlock Holmes type with a full understanding of the Japanese culture which he is quick to point out. Wesley Snipes is as one dimensional as ever and doing yet another action anti-hero with a short temper and a quick trigger finger. Put them together and not that much happens except that Kaufman is trying to play with their cultural differences and characters on a very amateurish level. Harvey Keitel and Ray Wise are doing what they can, while Tia Carrere´s Jingo is such a terrible put together character and Steve Buscemi is as lost as he was in "Escape from L.A.". My treat in "Rising Sun" was to see the beautiful supermodel Tatjana Patitz as she was raised in the southern part of Sweden were I´m from. Not much else was any sort of treat in "Rising Sun".