Scenes from a Marriage (Scener ur ett äktenskap) Reviews

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    Alec B Super Reviewer
    Jul 17, 2019

    Your mileage for Bergman's incessant probing of these characters may vary but that's ultimately what makes the ending work so well. Ullmann and Josephson are taken apart and put back together so often that you come to deeply understand their perspectives.

    Your mileage for Bergman's incessant probing of these characters may vary but that's ultimately what makes the ending work so well. Ullmann and Josephson are taken apart and put back together so often that you come to deeply understand their perspectives.

  • Jun 05, 2019

    An upper-middle class couple whose lives are too easy create drama in search for some excitement. I feel like this was one of the more honest films (or TV miniseries) I have seen, reminiscent of The Best Years of Our Lives in how it deals with its human subjects' real problems. As despicable as I found the Johan character, I could somehow relate to him in an uncomfortable way, which I found fascinating. Ingmar Bergman once again proves he's a master of dialogue.

    An upper-middle class couple whose lives are too easy create drama in search for some excitement. I feel like this was one of the more honest films (or TV miniseries) I have seen, reminiscent of The Best Years of Our Lives in how it deals with its human subjects' real problems. As despicable as I found the Johan character, I could somehow relate to him in an uncomfortable way, which I found fascinating. Ingmar Bergman once again proves he's a master of dialogue.

  • Jun 05, 2019

    Whether he speaks or she does, Bergman's speech is eventually his, never pretentious and always convincing. Scener Ur Ett Aktenskap Bergman is peeking where he ought not. Addition to that, he is also showing it to us. "I don't want to look at it", is my first reaction, when an environment so naked is created in a room where a married couple is discussing, well.. everything. The writer and director, Ingmar Bergman has to and is pivoting his entire film- that later was also broadcasted as a mini-series, since when he began to write about these character, he ended up with more than 4 hours of well edited storyline- in that very discussion. The finely detailed conversation is what he has majored in, in these characters, and he makes sure he pours in all the care of the world in those philosophical long talks, never derailing from the best asset of his film. Yes, he does jump up the shark a bit, but carrying this tune for almost three hours, the cinematically choreographed chemistry was mandatory, not to forget, it still is a Bergman production, leading these bizarre events analysed and justified to the core, digging one more level, one more dimension deep into these absorbing personas writhing on screen, in sync. Personally, I felt, the only element that let down was the performance. Although the long shots gives us a glimpse of theatre performers, performing a play, the 70-ness in them checks the melodrama into an off putting column. Shattered into six various acts, that derives a key element from the previous incident, the confrontation, self-deprivation, blame-game, philosophical and finally and personal favourite, peace. Each of them makes a jump in both time and their perception towards the world, neither making it look repeated nor completely different, their vocab follows a simple rule just as Bergman follows his pattern. Centred around a main event, followed from the previous vital point, followed by a thorough verbal sparring about each others views and ending on a poetic note, is how he paints the Scene From A Marriage.

    Whether he speaks or she does, Bergman's speech is eventually his, never pretentious and always convincing. Scener Ur Ett Aktenskap Bergman is peeking where he ought not. Addition to that, he is also showing it to us. "I don't want to look at it", is my first reaction, when an environment so naked is created in a room where a married couple is discussing, well.. everything. The writer and director, Ingmar Bergman has to and is pivoting his entire film- that later was also broadcasted as a mini-series, since when he began to write about these character, he ended up with more than 4 hours of well edited storyline- in that very discussion. The finely detailed conversation is what he has majored in, in these characters, and he makes sure he pours in all the care of the world in those philosophical long talks, never derailing from the best asset of his film. Yes, he does jump up the shark a bit, but carrying this tune for almost three hours, the cinematically choreographed chemistry was mandatory, not to forget, it still is a Bergman production, leading these bizarre events analysed and justified to the core, digging one more level, one more dimension deep into these absorbing personas writhing on screen, in sync. Personally, I felt, the only element that let down was the performance. Although the long shots gives us a glimpse of theatre performers, performing a play, the 70-ness in them checks the melodrama into an off putting column. Shattered into six various acts, that derives a key element from the previous incident, the confrontation, self-deprivation, blame-game, philosophical and finally and personal favourite, peace. Each of them makes a jump in both time and their perception towards the world, neither making it look repeated nor completely different, their vocab follows a simple rule just as Bergman follows his pattern. Centred around a main event, followed from the previous vital point, followed by a thorough verbal sparring about each others views and ending on a poetic note, is how he paints the Scene From A Marriage.

  • Mar 01, 2019

    Psychologically penetrating Bergman portrait of a marriage.

    Psychologically penetrating Bergman portrait of a marriage.

  • Jan 30, 2019

    In 1973, Ingmar Bergman created a six-part TV miniseries (close to 5 hours) depicting a marriage that collapses and the aftermath. Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson play the couple and their acting skill is astounding (especially Ullmannâ(TM)s, as she has the wider range of emotions to play). Bergman pulls no punches â" this is often raw and intense and vulnerabilities are exposed. Anyone in a long-term relationship will have a lot to think about. But yet, the view of relationships seems to be overtly Bergmanâ(TM)s and the autobiographical nature of these âscenesâ? is obvious â" he is Josephsonâ(TM)s character (Johan) but he has immense sympathy for Ullmanâ(TM)s character (Marianne) and the film âtakes her sideâ?. You could say that this is because of Bergmanâ(TM)s own guilt over his series of failed marriages and many concurrent affairs (including with Ullmann). Naturally, the characters discuss this guilt and where it comes from and whether it is justified. They discuss a lot of heavy things (the film is all talk), perhaps more than in the usual marriage (unless it is self-destructing), and problems with gender roles are explicitly chewed over. Johan blames the âwomenâ(TM)s libâ? movement and Marianne blames the role stresses that she experiences (mother, wife, lawyer, daughter). Of course, Johan is a complete cad â" he cheats on Marianne â" but he is a painfully honest cad, breaking up their marriage and explaining in terrible detail why he is doing so, in a way that canâ(TM)t help but hurt them both. After this moment, we check in with the relationship at varying intervals in the future (roughly one, five, and ten years later). Johan and Marianne have taken different trajectories (his academic career and his newer relationship are struggling but she is feeling more and more confident and self-aware). Yet â" and this may be Bergmanâ(TM)s fantasy â" they are still close, perhaps still in love, still volatile (able to set each other off), and impossible to extricate from their relationship. Is this optimistic? Maybe. It _is_ evidence of the way that people can impact each other, for better or for worse. I am not certain that I âbelieveâ? that this is the way most failed marriages play out (but the emotional moments in the film always seem to ring true). Bergman edited the 5-hour version down to 2 Â 1/2 for a feature film that played in the US in 1974 (both are in the blu-ray boxset) â" it is possible that the short version would be even more intense without the natural lulls. Although Ullmann and Josephson are on screen all of the time, we also see another couple with a distressed marriage (including Bibi Andersson), Johanâ(TM)s partner in a workplace affair, and Marianneâ(TM)s mother. The interactions with these other characters offer some counterpoints. I could go on â" there is much to digest. If Iâ(TM)ve scared you (or the content itself does), let me say that despite the topic/events, the film is never less than absorbing and can be funny, thrilling, challenging, and yes distressing, but always worth watching.

    In 1973, Ingmar Bergman created a six-part TV miniseries (close to 5 hours) depicting a marriage that collapses and the aftermath. Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson play the couple and their acting skill is astounding (especially Ullmannâ(TM)s, as she has the wider range of emotions to play). Bergman pulls no punches â" this is often raw and intense and vulnerabilities are exposed. Anyone in a long-term relationship will have a lot to think about. But yet, the view of relationships seems to be overtly Bergmanâ(TM)s and the autobiographical nature of these âscenesâ? is obvious â" he is Josephsonâ(TM)s character (Johan) but he has immense sympathy for Ullmanâ(TM)s character (Marianne) and the film âtakes her sideâ?. You could say that this is because of Bergmanâ(TM)s own guilt over his series of failed marriages and many concurrent affairs (including with Ullmann). Naturally, the characters discuss this guilt and where it comes from and whether it is justified. They discuss a lot of heavy things (the film is all talk), perhaps more than in the usual marriage (unless it is self-destructing), and problems with gender roles are explicitly chewed over. Johan blames the âwomenâ(TM)s libâ? movement and Marianne blames the role stresses that she experiences (mother, wife, lawyer, daughter). Of course, Johan is a complete cad â" he cheats on Marianne â" but he is a painfully honest cad, breaking up their marriage and explaining in terrible detail why he is doing so, in a way that canâ(TM)t help but hurt them both. After this moment, we check in with the relationship at varying intervals in the future (roughly one, five, and ten years later). Johan and Marianne have taken different trajectories (his academic career and his newer relationship are struggling but she is feeling more and more confident and self-aware). Yet â" and this may be Bergmanâ(TM)s fantasy â" they are still close, perhaps still in love, still volatile (able to set each other off), and impossible to extricate from their relationship. Is this optimistic? Maybe. It _is_ evidence of the way that people can impact each other, for better or for worse. I am not certain that I âbelieveâ? that this is the way most failed marriages play out (but the emotional moments in the film always seem to ring true). Bergman edited the 5-hour version down to 2 Â 1/2 for a feature film that played in the US in 1974 (both are in the blu-ray boxset) â" it is possible that the short version would be even more intense without the natural lulls. Although Ullmann and Josephson are on screen all of the time, we also see another couple with a distressed marriage (including Bibi Andersson), Johanâ(TM)s partner in a workplace affair, and Marianneâ(TM)s mother. The interactions with these other characters offer some counterpoints. I could go on â" there is much to digest. If Iâ(TM)ve scared you (or the content itself does), let me say that despite the topic/events, the film is never less than absorbing and can be funny, thrilling, challenging, and yes distressing, but always worth watching.

  • Aug 25, 2018

    not actually seen -- saw, rather, the unabridged 6-part episodic version -- one of the best depictions of a relationship ever seen.

    not actually seen -- saw, rather, the unabridged 6-part episodic version -- one of the best depictions of a relationship ever seen.

  • Jun 17, 2017

    At times loquacious but brutally honest and intimate, Ingmar Bergman's exhaustive deconstruction of a modern marriage laced with emotional illiteracy and cerebral masochism remains harrowingly relevant to this day.

    At times loquacious but brutally honest and intimate, Ingmar Bergman's exhaustive deconstruction of a modern marriage laced with emotional illiteracy and cerebral masochism remains harrowingly relevant to this day.

  • Apr 01, 2017

    Very good miniseries. It was so romantic, had great acting, and it had such an amazing ending. The only flaw was that it was a bit drawn out and I couldn't really decide if it was realistic or not. You can tell the influence it had on the Before Sunrise Trilogy. Wonderful miniseries.

    Very good miniseries. It was so romantic, had great acting, and it had such an amazing ending. The only flaw was that it was a bit drawn out and I couldn't really decide if it was realistic or not. You can tell the influence it had on the Before Sunrise Trilogy. Wonderful miniseries.

  • Jul 08, 2016

    Ingmar Bergman's look on contemporary marriage is piercing, honest and quite often painful to watch, while Liv Ullmann's performance is astonishing.

    Ingmar Bergman's look on contemporary marriage is piercing, honest and quite often painful to watch, while Liv Ullmann's performance is astonishing.

  • Jan 15, 2016

    An intense, engrossing drama that goes in a direction I didn't expect.

    An intense, engrossing drama that goes in a direction I didn't expect.