Seed of Chucky (2004) - Rotten Tomatoes

Seed of Chucky (2004)

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When the notoriously evil Chucky doll and his lover gave birth, they had no idea that their spawn would grow up to be a peace-loving kind of guy; however, that's exactly what Glen turns out to be: a gentle soul who is horrified at what he has been told about his family. After hearing the news of a film being made about his parents' murderous legacy, Glen sets off for Hollywood, where he promptly brings Chucky and Tiffany back to life. Far from diving into doting fatherhood, Chucky is seriously disappointed in his son's lack of inherent evil and tries his best to impart his vast knowledge of all things malevolent before Glen becomes some sort of do-gooder. Elsewhere, Tiffany finds that she will be played by Jennifer Tilly in their movie and doesn't hesitate to let her son in on their family's most cherished tradition -- killing sprees. Directed by Don Mancini, Seed of Chucky features Brad Dourif returning as the voice of Chucky, while Tilly plays both herself and Tiffany. The offspring of the evil pair, Glen, is voiced by Lord of the Rings star Billy Boyd. Cult film director John Waters also makes an appearance, as does hip-hop artist Redman.
Rating:
R (for strong horror violence/gore, sexual content and language)
Genre:
Comedy , Horror
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Box Office:
$17,016,190.00
Runtime:
Studio:

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Cast

Brad Dourif
as Chucky
Billy Boyd
as Glen/Glenda
Jennifer Tilly
as Herself, Tiffany
John Waters
as Pete Peters
Redman
as Himself
Tony Gardner
as Himself
Nicholas Rowe
as Lawyer
Stephanie Chambers
as Claudia's Mum
Simon James Morgan
as Claudia's Dad
Beans El-Balawi
as Human Glen
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News & Interviews for Seed of Chucky

Critic Reviews for Seed of Chucky

All Critics (75) | Top Critics (18)

By far, the most shocking carnage is Tilly carving up her persona. What a doll.

Full Review… | November 17, 2004
Entertainment Weekly
Top Critic

The film mostly shoots blanks; it's less than the sum of its in-jokes.

November 16, 2004
Village Voice
Top Critic

There is not a single scary moment in all of Seed of Chucky, so its laughs are welcome, though most of the humor falls flat.

Full Review… | November 15, 2004
New York Times
Top Critic

Were there an award for most bizarre and dispiriting comedy-horror hybrid featuring killer dolls, the latest installment in the Child's Play series would have it locked up.

Full Review… | November 15, 2004
San Francisco Chronicle
Top Critic

Little tip for Don Mancini, creator of Chucky the killer doll and writer-director of Seed of Chucky: Don't make jokes about Ed Wood -- the 'worst director in the history of Hollywood' -- if you can't do better.

November 15, 2004
Orlando Sentinel
Top Critic

A tip of the hat to Ed Wood's 1953 Glen or Glenda, which is a masterpiece in comparison to this cheesy dreck.

November 15, 2004
Los Angeles Times
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Seed of Chucky

Horror franchises are invariably subject to the law of diminishing returns. The original Nightmare on Elm Street, Hallowe'en or Friday the 13th were so definitive in their own ways that any sequel couldn't hope to improve upon them, aside from addressing certain technical issues. Even with partial returns to form along the way, these sequels inevitably ended up retreading old ground, even in franchises that didn't start from the top. The Child's Play franchise seemed to have run its course when Child's Play 3 went straight-to-video, only for Ronny Yu's Bride of Chucky to give it a new lease of life. By abandoning outright horror in favour of self-aware, postmodern horror-comedy, the series successfully embraced its goofier elements and turned them into something disturbingly memorable. Seed of Chucky attempts to carry on where Bride left off, but is far less successful, being ill-thought out and poorly directed. Playing the postmodern game is a gamble in any genre. Deliberately deconstructing a story, or drawing attention to the artificiality of a given situation, can have the effect of undermining the audience's emotional attachment. The horror genre, like fantasy and sci-fi, relies heavily on the suspension of disbelief: without an audience investing in the characters and their situation, a horror film cannot be scary. On a narrative level, Seed of Chucky is trying very hard to be Wes Craven's New Nightmare, one of the best instalments of the Nightmare on Elm Street series. Craven's meta-horror explored the boundaries between the characters and the actors that played them, nodding toward the films' often fanatical fanbase and poking fun at the absurdities of the film industry. While not as scary as the original, it managed to be both a successful postmodern exercise and a compelling horror movie in its own right. The biggest problem facing Seed of Chucky is that Don Mancini is no Wes Craven. While his writing skills are not in doubt (at least on the first Child's Play film), he does not have the directorial skill to pull off something so self-referential. Where Craven directed with intelligence, giving the audience both gore and clever subtext, Mancini is content to go for something much more basic and yet pass it off as being clever. The film isn't pretentious in this regard per se, but it makes disappointingly little out of both its premise and material. There's always a certain amount of pleasure to be mined from actors playing themselves and taking the mickey. Jennifer Tilly has a lot of screen presence, and film fans will nod approvingly at all the references to Bound (her break-out role with the pre-Matrix Wachowskis). But once the basic gag is out of the way - Tilly is a fading actress who 'dolls herself up' to get a part - the film keeps repeating itself until the concept is neither funny or interesting anymore. Likewise, many of the horror nods in Seed of Chucky are underused. John Waters is a widely respected figure in cult film circles, and casting the director of Pink Flamingos as a seedy paparatso is a nice touch. But his character doesn't get to do much that is endearing or appealing beyond the confines of the initial joke. It's very much a one-joke role, with Waters quickly mining it for all its worth and then spending the rest of his screen time looking confused. Seed of Chucky isn't all that scary either, though that isn't entirely surprising. The Child's Play series was never an out-and-out frightener, with even the first and best instalment having goofy tendencies and a pretty silly set-up. But while Bride of Chucky made its humour dark enough to give the title character some threat, Seed of Chucky is completely ramshackle, with its few scary moments not being properly supported by the surrounding plot. Gorehounds will probably find something to enjoy in the numerous grissly death scenes, which are technically accomplished from a props and make-up perspective. The deaths vary in their level of comedic inventiveness, with the disembowling at the dinner table probably being the most memorable. But as far as suspense or terror is concerned, there's nothing in Seed of Chucky which comes together; the horrific moments are sporadic and don't escalate in any particularly successful fashion. The comedy of Seed of Chucky is equally hit-and-miss. On top of its botched self-awareness, many of the character jokes are laboured. The whole discussion about Glen's gender quickly becomes tired, with the Ed Wood reference being run into the ground and the pay-off with Glen's cross-dressing being unsatisfying. The running jokes about Glen weeing himself through fear are better than the similar gags in Garbage Pail Kids, but that's about as far from a ringing endorsement as one can get. Most of the funny moments come from the ridiculous nature of a given situation. The film does go the whole hog when it comes to Chucky and Tiffany's preposterous plan to regain human form, particularly when it comes to getting Tilly pregnant. Brad Dourif has always done black comedy very well, as evidenced through his subsequent work with Werner Herzog. And having never shared a scene together in The Lord of the Rings (save in the extended cut of The Return of the King), it's nice to see him and Billy Boyd interacting here. For all its funny moments, however, Seed of Chucky never becomes any more than a collection of poorly-assembled bits. It never gets to grips with its storyline beyond what is needed for a given scene to pay off, nor can it really decide whether it wants to satirise the film business or just use it as a plot device. There have been many worse horror films and worse films about the film businesses, but there are few horror-comedies which are this actively episodic. The film also comes up short from a visual standpoint. Bride of Chucky was shot by Peter Pau, who went on to win an Oscar for his work on the brilliant Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. He retained many of the signature touches of Child's Play while bringing a more tongue-in-cheek sensibility to the lighting. This film, on the other hand, is lensed by Vernon Layton, who shot the equally disappointing Blackball, featuring Paul Kaye and Johnny Vegas. Like Blackball, Seed of Chucky has a tacky feel to it which works against Mancini's efforts to make us like the characters. The colour palette is far too plastic and glossy to be a proper black comedy or horror film, with the choice of colours and angles lending themselves more to American Pie or the Wayans brothers. Put simply, it feels cheap, and looks far too mainstream to cut it as a proper Chucky movie. Seed of Chucky is a disappointing sequel which is neither funny nor scary enough to hold a candle to its predecessor. For all the moments which produce a shudder from the gore or a snigger from the jokes, it ultimately never makes as much of its premise as it really should. It's not an unmitigated disaster, and there are many worse horror sequels, but it will leave both fans and newcomers feeling short-changed.

Daniel Mumby
Daniel Mumby

Super Reviewer

½

The script continue to be poor and amateur, but Seed of Chucky is great to watch. Very funny entertainment with a new interesting character: Glen (the title character), that present surprising question to his parents. Brad Dourif as Chucky, continue to make a great acting voice to this movie.

Lucas Martins
Lucas Martins

Super Reviewer

½

This film makes no sense. The reason each character in this film returns is all kind of cynical and really got on my nerves throughout the picture. I honestly cannot find much about this film that I enjoyed rather than a few funny moments with their offspring "Glen or Glenda." "Seed of Chucky" has no idea what kind of film it wants to be and it is not scary even in the slightest. I felt like I was watching a dark sitcom about a family of dolls who murder people. This is not what a Chucky movie is supposed to be, nor any horror film for that matter. In the end, I will, as will everyone, forget about this film entirely, or just enough to explain to people how bad it is. It's not the worst Chucky instalment, but it's pretty damn bad.

KJ Proulx
KJ Proulx

Super Reviewer

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