Sextette Reviews

  • Dec 19, 2019

    This campy calamity brings new meaning to the dictum "go West young man!"—while a disco duet between the octogenarian and James Bond had me thinking, with all due respect to the legendary sexpot (none of which is on screen here), "go to bed, old lady." Cannonical scale: 1.5/5 — The whole affair is honestly too bad and too depressing to riff of in good conscious.

    This campy calamity brings new meaning to the dictum "go West young man!"—while a disco duet between the octogenarian and James Bond had me thinking, with all due respect to the legendary sexpot (none of which is on screen here), "go to bed, old lady." Cannonical scale: 1.5/5 — The whole affair is honestly too bad and too depressing to riff of in good conscious.

  • Aug 16, 2018

    Mae West was well in her 80's when starring in "Sextette." Mea was slow- moving, but she still comes across as a sexy and funny actress. It truly amazes me how she can look so good and be so cool. Mae's costumes are so glamorous, and her makeup is really on point. The scene when she is visiting with those boys and finds her pink cassette is so funny. I know it may not be her best film, but it is still a fun, colorful, and campy film

    Mae West was well in her 80's when starring in "Sextette." Mea was slow- moving, but she still comes across as a sexy and funny actress. It truly amazes me how she can look so good and be so cool. Mae's costumes are so glamorous, and her makeup is really on point. The scene when she is visiting with those boys and finds her pink cassette is so funny. I know it may not be her best film, but it is still a fun, colorful, and campy film

  • Aug 13, 2015

    It's the wrong group of actors for the various musical numbers, but the film itself is a fun stage play farce set around a hotel. Considering she is nearly 90 in this movie, Mae West plays this no holds barred.

    It's the wrong group of actors for the various musical numbers, but the film itself is a fun stage play farce set around a hotel. Considering she is nearly 90 in this movie, Mae West plays this no holds barred.

  • jay n Super Reviewer
    Jul 04, 2014

    This was no way for Mae West to end her storied career but unfortunately it was the end of the line for her. Simply awful and embarrassing. Even for camp aficionados this will be rough going.

    This was no way for Mae West to end her storied career but unfortunately it was the end of the line for her. Simply awful and embarrassing. Even for camp aficionados this will be rough going.

  • Apr 19, 2013

    This is very cheesy yet somehow very entertaining. This does have alot of great cameos by standard 70's comedy stars,along with musicians such as Keith Moon and Alice Cooper. Timothy Dalton also looks like such a babyface in this considering it came out in 1978. Mae West also makes one of her final film appearances along with Keith Moon who both Died shortly after this film. So this is good to just watch before bed that way you don't really miss much and can throw it on as background noise.

    This is very cheesy yet somehow very entertaining. This does have alot of great cameos by standard 70's comedy stars,along with musicians such as Keith Moon and Alice Cooper. Timothy Dalton also looks like such a babyface in this considering it came out in 1978. Mae West also makes one of her final film appearances along with Keith Moon who both Died shortly after this film. So this is good to just watch before bed that way you don't really miss much and can throw it on as background noise.

  • Mar 25, 2013

    What isn't legitimately funny is ludicrously over the top. You simply can't hate this movie.

    What isn't legitimately funny is ludicrously over the top. You simply can't hate this movie.

  • Apr 02, 2012

    So bad it's good! As if Mae West trying to be a sex bomb wasn't funny enough,she's married to a very young Timothy Dalton. There's loads of cameos from the likes of Ringo Star,George Martin,Alice Cooper and Tony Curtis. Possibly THE campest film ever made.

    So bad it's good! As if Mae West trying to be a sex bomb wasn't funny enough,she's married to a very young Timothy Dalton. There's loads of cameos from the likes of Ringo Star,George Martin,Alice Cooper and Tony Curtis. Possibly THE campest film ever made.

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    Eric B Super Reviewer
    Jan 13, 2012

    The Village People's "Can't Stop the Music" and the Peter Frampton/Bee Gees take on "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" draw most of the heat, but "Sextette" deserves equal enshrinement as one of the disco era's ultimate film catastrophes. Mae West essentially plays herself as actress Marlo Manners, humbly introduced as "Hollywood's all-time superstar" and "the greatest sex symbol the screen has ever known." Her list of lovers is even more outrageous than her age-hiding makeup, and she has just married her sixth husband, Sir Michael Barrington (Timothy Dalton, during his hungrier years). She and Michael have retired to their honeymoon suite and are eager to git busy, but the paparazzi (including Regis Philbin and Rona Barrett), ex-husbands (Ringo Starr, Tony Curtis, George Hamilton) and Marlo's entourage (notably Dom De Luise, perhaps the only cast member who comes off well) are a steady obstacle. Songs keep popping up regardless of how loudly you protest, and they aren't even originals except for a pair written by Van "The Hustle" McCoy. Instead you get nuggets such as "Love Will Keep Us Together" (this is why James Bond never sings), "Baby Face," "After You've Gone," the Beatles' "Honey Pie" and "Hooray for Hollywood." Usually with slick, period-dated arrangements. Awkward subplots feature a world-government conflict that only Marlo can solve (the Jimmy Carter lookalike is a tasteless cringe) and a pink cassette of her memoirs that she paradoxically labors over despite believing it needs to be destroyed. Don't miss the cameos of Keith Moon and Alice Cooper, though. Moon (sadly near death) is a flamboyant costume designer, and an unrecognizable Cooper is a well-groomed waiter who performs the film's only semi-listenable song on piano. Seeing a slimmer De Luise tap-dance is another fun surprise. West probably deserves some leeway, considering she was eighty-something at the time. It's ludicrous to present herself as a lust object who would drive men like Dalton and Hamilton wild, but she does supply an adequate string of one-liners to swat back obvious set-ups such as "I'll keep a stiff upper lip." Har har. (Actually, one pun about director Ernst Lubitsch is quite clever, and there's also her oft-quoted "...or are you just happy to see me?" quip.)

    The Village People's "Can't Stop the Music" and the Peter Frampton/Bee Gees take on "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" draw most of the heat, but "Sextette" deserves equal enshrinement as one of the disco era's ultimate film catastrophes. Mae West essentially plays herself as actress Marlo Manners, humbly introduced as "Hollywood's all-time superstar" and "the greatest sex symbol the screen has ever known." Her list of lovers is even more outrageous than her age-hiding makeup, and she has just married her sixth husband, Sir Michael Barrington (Timothy Dalton, during his hungrier years). She and Michael have retired to their honeymoon suite and are eager to git busy, but the paparazzi (including Regis Philbin and Rona Barrett), ex-husbands (Ringo Starr, Tony Curtis, George Hamilton) and Marlo's entourage (notably Dom De Luise, perhaps the only cast member who comes off well) are a steady obstacle. Songs keep popping up regardless of how loudly you protest, and they aren't even originals except for a pair written by Van "The Hustle" McCoy. Instead you get nuggets such as "Love Will Keep Us Together" (this is why James Bond never sings), "Baby Face," "After You've Gone," the Beatles' "Honey Pie" and "Hooray for Hollywood." Usually with slick, period-dated arrangements. Awkward subplots feature a world-government conflict that only Marlo can solve (the Jimmy Carter lookalike is a tasteless cringe) and a pink cassette of her memoirs that she paradoxically labors over despite believing it needs to be destroyed. Don't miss the cameos of Keith Moon and Alice Cooper, though. Moon (sadly near death) is a flamboyant costume designer, and an unrecognizable Cooper is a well-groomed waiter who performs the film's only semi-listenable song on piano. Seeing a slimmer De Luise tap-dance is another fun surprise. West probably deserves some leeway, considering she was eighty-something at the time. It's ludicrous to present herself as a lust object who would drive men like Dalton and Hamilton wild, but she does supply an adequate string of one-liners to swat back obvious set-ups such as "I'll keep a stiff upper lip." Har har. (Actually, one pun about director Ernst Lubitsch is quite clever, and there's also her oft-quoted "...or are you just happy to see me?" quip.)

  • Jun 04, 2011

    The most appropriate word would be "unfortunate." I give it a star only because West does manage to get in a couple of her classic one-liners, but really, I can think of no good reason for anyone to ever watch this movie. West fans it will depress. Camp fans it will disappoint. Anyone else, it will baffle.

    The most appropriate word would be "unfortunate." I give it a star only because West does manage to get in a couple of her classic one-liners, but really, I can think of no good reason for anyone to ever watch this movie. West fans it will depress. Camp fans it will disappoint. Anyone else, it will baffle.

  • Apr 06, 2011

    Sometimes going into a film blind can be a dangerous thing. I knew nothing about Sextette when I popped it in. When I saw the cast that was in this I thought it wouldn't be too bad. It even has Alice Cooper in it although you'd be hard pressed to recognize him. Mae West is far past her prime but still delivers the double entendres that that actually are the best part. Love the line 'Im the girl who works @ Paramount & Fox all night'. The truly horrible part (& there is a lot of bad here) is that it is a musical & the numbers are just fucking terrible. There's even a rendition of Captain & Tennille's Love Will Keep Us together...Fucking brutal

    Sometimes going into a film blind can be a dangerous thing. I knew nothing about Sextette when I popped it in. When I saw the cast that was in this I thought it wouldn't be too bad. It even has Alice Cooper in it although you'd be hard pressed to recognize him. Mae West is far past her prime but still delivers the double entendres that that actually are the best part. Love the line 'Im the girl who works @ Paramount & Fox all night'. The truly horrible part (& there is a lot of bad here) is that it is a musical & the numbers are just fucking terrible. There's even a rendition of Captain & Tennille's Love Will Keep Us together...Fucking brutal