Shoot the Moon Reviews

  • Apr 27, 2019

    Way over rated. Great acting, but it all feels so pandering and artificial. Role your eyes at the stereotypical sitcom-like kids. That ridiculous restaurant fight is awful. In no reality would people do this without all others in the place complaining way more, and the management stepping in way sooner. That kind of artificiality permeates every scene.

    Way over rated. Great acting, but it all feels so pandering and artificial. Role your eyes at the stereotypical sitcom-like kids. That ridiculous restaurant fight is awful. In no reality would people do this without all others in the place complaining way more, and the management stepping in way sooner. That kind of artificiality permeates every scene.

  • Jan 13, 2019

    The best movie ever. Life, love, loss. But strength throughout.

    The best movie ever. Life, love, loss. But strength throughout.

  • Apr 25, 2017

    If you have ever experienced a divorce, or been in one, Shoot the Moon knows what it is like. Usually dismissed as a "family drama," this 1982 film starring the incomparable Albert Finney (the greatest actor the Earth has ever had walk on it) and the excellent Diane Keaton is among the most genuine portraits of love's trance ever produced. Lov, is a physical mirage. Once you're in it, you can't get out of it, and if you're out of it you usually look for the person who looks like the one you were originally married to. When Finney and Keaton divorce, Keaton finds Peter Weller, who looks quite a bit like Finney, and Finney finds Karen Allen, who strikes a resemblance to Keaton. They each try to make scenes but it somehow draws them together. One might recall Bunuel's "That Obscure Object of Desire," when a sexually repressed man falls in love with the same women, played by two different people that alternate between scenes. Take that, and insert the more emotionally-charged side of it. Now you have more compelling material.

    If you have ever experienced a divorce, or been in one, Shoot the Moon knows what it is like. Usually dismissed as a "family drama," this 1982 film starring the incomparable Albert Finney (the greatest actor the Earth has ever had walk on it) and the excellent Diane Keaton is among the most genuine portraits of love's trance ever produced. Lov, is a physical mirage. Once you're in it, you can't get out of it, and if you're out of it you usually look for the person who looks like the one you were originally married to. When Finney and Keaton divorce, Keaton finds Peter Weller, who looks quite a bit like Finney, and Finney finds Karen Allen, who strikes a resemblance to Keaton. They each try to make scenes but it somehow draws them together. One might recall Bunuel's "That Obscure Object of Desire," when a sexually repressed man falls in love with the same women, played by two different people that alternate between scenes. Take that, and insert the more emotionally-charged side of it. Now you have more compelling material.

  • Aug 10, 2015

    This is my third entry into Alan Parker's filmography (after BIRDY 1984, 8/10 and THE LIFE OF DAVID GALE 2003, 7/10), SHOOT THE MOON is a visceral divorce drama, centres on Faith and George Dunlap (Keaton and Finney), a couple married for 15 years with four daughters, living in a quaint farmhouse near San Francisco, George is a successful writer, but he has an affair with a divorcée Sandy (Allen), from the beginning Parker and screenwriter Goldman manifestly position George as the one who gets frustrated in their marriage, and should be responsible for the dissolution of their marriage. keep reading my review on my blog, thanks http://wp.me/p1eXom-1Z4

    This is my third entry into Alan Parker's filmography (after BIRDY 1984, 8/10 and THE LIFE OF DAVID GALE 2003, 7/10), SHOOT THE MOON is a visceral divorce drama, centres on Faith and George Dunlap (Keaton and Finney), a couple married for 15 years with four daughters, living in a quaint farmhouse near San Francisco, George is a successful writer, but he has an affair with a divorcée Sandy (Allen), from the beginning Parker and screenwriter Goldman manifestly position George as the one who gets frustrated in their marriage, and should be responsible for the dissolution of their marriage. keep reading my review on my blog, thanks http://wp.me/p1eXom-1Z4

  • May 10, 2015

    Highly underrated and somewhat forgotten study of divorce. Albert Finney and Diane Keaton give painfully real performances.

    Highly underrated and somewhat forgotten study of divorce. Albert Finney and Diane Keaton give painfully real performances.

  • Jan 05, 2015

    A racking film which explores divorce with sensitivity and artistic skill.

    A racking film which explores divorce with sensitivity and artistic skill.

  • Apr 13, 2014

    The best movie ever made about divorce! Top 25 movies of the 80s!

    The best movie ever made about divorce! Top 25 movies of the 80s!

  • Jul 04, 2013

    Keaton is tremendous, once again.

    Keaton is tremendous, once again.

  • Jun 26, 2013

    Pretentious trash that takes shallow to new depths. A portrait of a marriage of two selfish and self-absorbed people that goes nowhere. I spent two of the longest hours of my life watching this repetitive and boring film.

    Pretentious trash that takes shallow to new depths. A portrait of a marriage of two selfish and self-absorbed people that goes nowhere. I spent two of the longest hours of my life watching this repetitive and boring film.

  • Feb 19, 2013

    One of the best ever.

    One of the best ever.