Stone Reader Reviews

  • Dec 25, 2019

    Here's an obscure documentary about an obscure book written by an obscure writer, and the documentary maker's hunt for answers - that is, for the secret of why this excellent first novel went out of print. It seems the author stopped writing and disappeared. Who is the author, really? Is he still alive? Why didn't the book get more press? Why is it out of print? Why isn't there another novel? The documentary was filmed as answers to these questions were sought. First the search is in vain. Then a clue turns up...

    Here's an obscure documentary about an obscure book written by an obscure writer, and the documentary maker's hunt for answers - that is, for the secret of why this excellent first novel went out of print. It seems the author stopped writing and disappeared. Who is the author, really? Is he still alive? Why didn't the book get more press? Why is it out of print? Why isn't there another novel? The documentary was filmed as answers to these questions were sought. First the search is in vain. Then a clue turns up...

  • Jan 29, 2012

    Whether the book in question is the masterpiece it is claimed to be or not, The Stone Reader is a wonderful journey to take, especially for those interested in writing. Meandering at a pleasant pace the film investigates a book written in the 70's that received rave reviews, claiming it was the book of a generation. The book however wasn't successful, soon disappearing from shelves, and the writer never went on to write another book, simply disappearing from existence. SR is the journey one fan takes in trying to track down what happened to the author. And while he takes his merry old time, there is revelation at the end of the film that is truly rewarding. A very entertaining documentary!

    Whether the book in question is the masterpiece it is claimed to be or not, The Stone Reader is a wonderful journey to take, especially for those interested in writing. Meandering at a pleasant pace the film investigates a book written in the 70's that received rave reviews, claiming it was the book of a generation. The book however wasn't successful, soon disappearing from shelves, and the writer never went on to write another book, simply disappearing from existence. SR is the journey one fan takes in trying to track down what happened to the author. And while he takes his merry old time, there is revelation at the end of the film that is truly rewarding. A very entertaining documentary!

  • Sep 05, 2011

    An interesting little documentary about the passion we attach to books, reading and how we connect to other readers. The director buys a book, "The Stone Summer" while in his teens in the '70's. Tries to read it but gives up, letting it slide until he picks of up and finishes it 25 years later. Surprised by the quality of the story-telling he tries to find more on the author and finds absolutely nothing. So begins his quest to find this reclusive author, and ever wondering how can a writer publish a book so amazing and then simple dissapear into thin air. An entertaining if a bit abstract study in what it is to be a reader and a writer. Watch it with someone who loves to read, it makes for a great conversation.

    An interesting little documentary about the passion we attach to books, reading and how we connect to other readers. The director buys a book, "The Stone Summer" while in his teens in the '70's. Tries to read it but gives up, letting it slide until he picks of up and finishes it 25 years later. Surprised by the quality of the story-telling he tries to find more on the author and finds absolutely nothing. So begins his quest to find this reclusive author, and ever wondering how can a writer publish a book so amazing and then simple dissapear into thin air. An entertaining if a bit abstract study in what it is to be a reader and a writer. Watch it with someone who loves to read, it makes for a great conversation.

  • Sep 26, 2010

    This is a fascinating movie; I love listening to people talking about books and reading and such. And it provokes many thoughts about what constitutes success. It's a little tengential and, although I didn't find it boring, it could have been shorter or more to the point.

    This is a fascinating movie; I love listening to people talking about books and reading and such. And it provokes many thoughts about what constitutes success. It's a little tengential and, although I didn't find it boring, it could have been shorter or more to the point.

  • Apr 03, 2010

    One of the most intriguing documentaries I've seen in quite awhile. "The Stone Reader" is the perfect film for literature nerds and avid book readers, a movie that is all at once (a) one man's quest to find the author of a book he admired from the 1970s, (b) a meditation on an individual's reading life, reading habits, and the unique relationship formed between author and reader (there's a very sad moment when the filmmaker reflects upon the death of Joseph Heller, the first literary author he felt had truly spoken to him), and (c) a striking argument about the state of the publishing industry, and how marketing demands can kill an aspiring writer's budding potential. I really can't recommend "The Stone Reader" enough. The filmmaker sometimes comes across a little too heavy, but if you love literature, this is one of the few movies that will ever make you want to start reading (and reading voraciously) after the credits roll. There's a quick scene in which Moskowitz shows us his personal bookshelf, and as he discusses how it's organized, you start thinking, "Yeah, mine too. Oh, I've read that. That, too." Just as the film is a meditation on the conversation between author and reader, so too is the film a conversation between Moskowitz and his viewers: a conversation about all of the conversations we've unknowingly shared together.

    One of the most intriguing documentaries I've seen in quite awhile. "The Stone Reader" is the perfect film for literature nerds and avid book readers, a movie that is all at once (a) one man's quest to find the author of a book he admired from the 1970s, (b) a meditation on an individual's reading life, reading habits, and the unique relationship formed between author and reader (there's a very sad moment when the filmmaker reflects upon the death of Joseph Heller, the first literary author he felt had truly spoken to him), and (c) a striking argument about the state of the publishing industry, and how marketing demands can kill an aspiring writer's budding potential. I really can't recommend "The Stone Reader" enough. The filmmaker sometimes comes across a little too heavy, but if you love literature, this is one of the few movies that will ever make you want to start reading (and reading voraciously) after the credits roll. There's a quick scene in which Moskowitz shows us his personal bookshelf, and as he discusses how it's organized, you start thinking, "Yeah, mine too. Oh, I've read that. That, too." Just as the film is a meditation on the conversation between author and reader, so too is the film a conversation between Moskowitz and his viewers: a conversation about all of the conversations we've unknowingly shared together.

  • Feb 28, 2010

    A good doc to knit by. And as a reader it was interesting to hear the many discussions about successful first time novelists who never publish again.

    A good doc to knit by. And as a reader it was interesting to hear the many discussions about successful first time novelists who never publish again.

  • Nov 16, 2009

    not bad- the narrator was amusing to watch and the discussions about books were interesting. but it was a bit too long and the payoff- his conversation with Mossman- almost became something of a postscript because of it. worth watching, though, certainly. especially if you're a lover of fine literature. it was interesting enough to make me want to read Stones of Summer, so that's something.

    not bad- the narrator was amusing to watch and the discussions about books were interesting. but it was a bit too long and the payoff- his conversation with Mossman- almost became something of a postscript because of it. worth watching, though, certainly. especially if you're a lover of fine literature. it was interesting enough to make me want to read Stones of Summer, so that's something.

  • Jun 07, 2009

    Totally self-indulgent, totally elitist.

    Totally self-indulgent, totally elitist.

  • Jason S Super Reviewer
    Apr 12, 2009

    This isn't a good documentary. Towards the end of the film the director says he doesn't feel like finishing the film and in my mind I thought that I felt the same way. This flick feels mashed together. He heads out on these trips to interview people about the book, spend a lot of his personal time and money to seek these people out, and he didn't even bother to ask if they remembered anything about the book before heading out. A lot of his problems could have been solved if he had asked "Do you remember anything about this book? No? Ok thanks anyway." Most of his interviews went downhill fast. Plus he seemed to talk most of time. I really didn't feel like sitting through anymore when he finally tracks down the author and plans to meet with him. I pushed through the last half hour as he interviews the guy and when the movie ends I was upset. We received no answers to any of the questions that he had been searching for through the whole movie. All we had we a couple of random stories from this mans life and not once did the director think to ask... why did you not write another book? This movie fails for a lot of reasons and the biggest one being the director being more interested in himself than the story he was supposed to tell.

    This isn't a good documentary. Towards the end of the film the director says he doesn't feel like finishing the film and in my mind I thought that I felt the same way. This flick feels mashed together. He heads out on these trips to interview people about the book, spend a lot of his personal time and money to seek these people out, and he didn't even bother to ask if they remembered anything about the book before heading out. A lot of his problems could have been solved if he had asked "Do you remember anything about this book? No? Ok thanks anyway." Most of his interviews went downhill fast. Plus he seemed to talk most of time. I really didn't feel like sitting through anymore when he finally tracks down the author and plans to meet with him. I pushed through the last half hour as he interviews the guy and when the movie ends I was upset. We received no answers to any of the questions that he had been searching for through the whole movie. All we had we a couple of random stories from this mans life and not once did the director think to ask... why did you not write another book? This movie fails for a lot of reasons and the biggest one being the director being more interested in himself than the story he was supposed to tell.

  • Mar 25, 2009

    An interesting account of a man's search for the author of a favorite book. His journey leads to many fascinating discussions about the many pleasures of reading, the struggles of the writers, etc.

    An interesting account of a man's search for the author of a favorite book. His journey leads to many fascinating discussions about the many pleasures of reading, the struggles of the writers, etc.