Land in Anguish

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Movie Info

A Brazilian poet finds himself torn between the views of the man who raised him and those of a reformer.

Cast & Crew

Jardel Filho
Paulo Martins
Paulo Autran
Porfirio Diaz
José Lewgoy
Felipe Vieira
Paulo Gracindo
Don Julio Fuentes
Danuza Leao
Silvia
Clovis Bornay
Portuguese conqueror
Jofre Soares
Father Gil
Francisco Milani
Aldo
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Critic Reviews for Entranced Earth (Terra em Transe)

All Critics (4) | Top Critics (3) | Fresh (2) | Rotten (2)

  • I have now seen enough of Rocha's work to know that I dislike it for its own sake, and not for the unfamiliarity of its locale and people or for the ritual obsessiveness of its themes.

    January 15, 2005 | Rating: 2/5 | Full Review…
  • One of the later entries (1966) in Brazil's short-lived Cinema Novo movement, applying New Wave pyrotechnics to popular and political mythology.

    January 1, 2000 | Full Review…
  • Rocha's frenzied mise-en-scene, which borrows from Fellini, Antonioni, and European avant-garde theater, is so stylized and self-referential that it probably appealed less to the masses than to the left-wing intelligentsia it scrutinizes.

    January 1, 2000 | Full Review…
  • Quote not available.

    September 30, 2005 | Rating: 4/5

Audience Reviews for Entranced Earth (Terra em Transe)

  • Oct 29, 2012
    This Brechtian allegory of huge cinematic and historical importance never feels obsolete considering that a lot remains unchanged when it comes to politicians and their twisted ethics, and it is a delirious and audacious film of spellbinding imagery with no diverting subtlety.
    Carlos M Super Reviewer
  • Dec 23, 2009
    <i><b>-</b> What does your death prove? <b>-</b> The triumph of beauty and justice!</i> <CENTER><u>TERRA EM TRANSE (1967)</u></CENTER> <b>Director:</b> Glauber Rocha <b>Country:</b> Brazil <b>Genre:</b> Drama <b>Length:</b> 106 minutes <CENTER><a href="http://s712.photobucket.com/albums/ww125/ElCochran90/?action=view¤t=TerraemTranse.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i712.photobucket.com/albums/ww125/ElCochran90/TerraemTranse.jpg" border="0" alt="Terra em Transe,Land in Anguish,Brazil,Anguished Land,Glauber Rocha,Political drama"></a></CENTER> Two years before Costa-Gavras constructed the best political drama of the decade and one year after Algeria achieved independence thanks to the vision of Gillo Pontecorvo (cinematically speaking), <i>Terra em Transe</i> became a rare phenomenon. Few political dramas have achieved a giant status of mastery and technical innovation. Glauber Rocha, who mostly focused his filmmaking style and talents in the direction of westerns, dares to speak out loud for the sake of the Brazilian nation. Due to the heavy censorship of the tumultuous 60s, he disguises the truths of the country with a fictional creation, which is one of the smartest and most stylish decisions I have personally witnessed. The almost insignificant budget was no obstacle for Rocha, despite some obvious, yet justifiable technical flaws, and the governmental totalitarianism and mass media control did not stop <i>Terra em Transe</i> from being released. More than a spectacular political testament of passionate proportions and heavy Latin-American influence, it is a landmark in Brazilian cinema and an irrevocably influential masterpiece of unforgettable uniqueness and an unfathomable accuracy. <i>Terra em Transe</i> introduces us to a hypothetical and undeniably metaphorical Latin-American country called Eldorado. The protagonist is Paulo Martins, an idealistic and existentialistically anarchist journalist that fights against two equally corrupt parties. One party stands for the falsely populist form of government leaded by Felipe Vieira. The other party is headed by the conservative president Porfirio Diaz, who is supported by revolutionary forces. Amidst an imminent chaos, Paulo is taken to an emotional extreme when these two personages, who used to be two of his best friends in the past, unleash a catastrophic political turmoil derived from extremist measures and the mindless fanaticism and admiration of the masses. Director Glauber Rocha was nominated for a Golden Palm, which lost against Michelangelo Antonioni for his film <i>Blowup</i> (1966), and won the FIPRESCI Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. He also won the Grand Prix for the best Feature Film at the Locarno International Film Festival. <i>Terra em Transe</i> is a political analysis loosely based on the history of Brazil since the director intelligently hides Latin-American elements that are supposed to be interpreted as metaphors. In order to cover up their respective symbolic meanings (just like corrupt activists inside governments hide their respective roles hypocritically after an atrocious and lawfully incorrect crime), Rocha disguises them. Naturally, Paulo Martins represents the jaded member of a corrupt society of indecisive citizens that are constantly expecting the best from the worst candidate. However, their political impotence is an irrevocable element given to them by an "organized" social system. Felipe Vieira is the exclusively "Eldoradian" politician of strong convictions and unstoppable motivations that, unfortunately, executes his actions through corrupt and destructive means of low moral. Porfirio Díaz criticizes the unpopular and conservative regime of the famous Mexican general that achieved to be in the presidency of the country continuously from 1876 to 1911, a regime characterized by its repression and corruption despite the modernization and economic growth that Mexico went through during those times. Finally, Eldorado references the legend invented by South American natives of the 16th Century mindlessly pursued by mindless and ambitious Spanish conquistadores. Consequently, the film's intentions are bigger than what they seem to be. Audaciously typical of the political dramas that stood out during the 60s, the film represents the blind submission of the masses towards political figures because of false promises given prior to their respective periods in power. Moreover, the film makes a very important and noticeably outstanding questioning in the middle of the film: "How could an elected Governor answer to the candidate's promises?" Not to mention that Paulo sees politicians as equally corrupt beings: "speeches, principles, promises..." Perhaps it was the director's intention to mirror the political contradictoriness and complexity of the Brazilian state during the 60s with an avant-garde style of filmmaking, unintentionally addressing it with grandiloquence, yet not failing to achieve an unconventional structure of cinematic awe and a breathtaking camera work. Money, instead of morality and reputation speaks for the status of people while political assassinations occur amidst disturbing turmoil and chaos. Those who live under deplorable life conditions are brutally beaten under the excuse that they are extremists and, therefore, deteriorate a snobbish and pretentious image of their Third World country. The film moves with an invigorating pace and suddenly reaches astonishing proportions of architectonic artistry and bourgeois lavishness. Despite some technical flaws, such as the sound editing and the original dubbing, <i>Terra em Transe</i> is an experience mandatory of political knowledge and a preconception of the governmental world status. Nevertheless, the bravery is highly rewarding throughout, naming the fictional country "Eldorado" with the mere purpose of enhancing and detailing the pursuit of an impossible golden land of social, political, religious and folkloric stability. Paulo's idealism may be exaggerated, but concise, and it serves a specific purpose of liberalism, no matter how disorganized it seems in the character. After all, democracy is supposedly about choosing who will own politically alienated lives. Hence the unpopular mentality of finding "speeches, principles and promises" doubtful and dishonest is strengthened. However, the film is not drowned into its own pretentiousness. It presents facts disguised with allegorical plot elements and captivating imagery, and remains dialectic. More than directly questioning the corruption of conservativism and modern democracies that slowly start to become dictatorships, it offers the responsibility of objective judgment to the viewer and finally says "goodbye" without even helping to digest the brutality shown. <i>Terra em Transe</i> has the shadow of Latin-American injustice and the colonial imperialism behind it. Unbeknownst to the director, he immediately surpassed the intellectual emptiness and forced liberalism contained in the films of the 21st century. It confronts inequality and exalts the human condition, despite putting it in psychologically unbearable situations of political turmoil and societal disorder. Surprisingly solid performances and a poetical screenplay allows the film to reach a higher level of grandiosity and effectiveness while Rocha rings the alarm not only for Latin-American audiences, but for the world as well. Few times has a masterpiece been so allegorically precise. Despite that the best film of the director got immediate criticism from film fans because it seemed to subjective and utterly incomprehensible just to be banned by the Brazilian government, the film was latterly released since the Cannes Film Festival considered it for a brand new Golden Palm. More "incomprehensible" than the film itself is modern dictatorship and corrupt social systems. Riots are incomprehensible. Manifestations, although senseless, are not. Priorities are lost and the overpowerment of political figures will always stop the objectivity and rational capacity of the humankind to fairly govern and lead a nation to prosperity. Glauber Rocha, I have good news for you: you have been finally understood. 100/100
    Edgar C Super Reviewer
  • Oct 23, 2008
    Rocha the anarchist...well,partially.The Autran-Lewgoy-Filho trio of compulsive reactions is more than enough for the disbelievers to continue watching an operatic motion picture way ahead of its time.Sure,it's a flashback but what a flashback that was!!!
    Dimitris S Super Reviewer

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